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NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SCIENCE AND MATH teacher Jason Bui knew a few years back that he wanted to start an after-school chess club at S. Weir Mitchell Elementary, at 55th Street and Kingsessing Avenue, in Kingsessing. The pupils who joined the club - which he named the Minor Threats after the early-'80s hard-core punk band Minor Threat - had no idea that chess would have an impact on their minds, their attitudes and their families. "By the time we were the Minor Threats, I was already seeing an impact," said Bui, 33, who this year moved to Andrew Hamilton Elementary, on Spruce Street near 56th, West Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | By Ben Yagoda, Daily News Staff Writer
The bride's father-in-law, who is director of the Philadelphia Zoo, likens her to Mike Schmidt. A lawyer friend says her defection from Russia to the United States is like Charles Barkley leaving the Sixers for the Celtics. And she isn't even an athlete. The object of these remarks and flattering comparisons is Elena Akhmilovskaya, the world's third-ranked women's chess player who is widely admired in her native Russia. Elena slipped away from her fellow chess-team members in Salonika, Greece, on Nov. 25 and married John Davidson, a coach of American women chess players and son of Bill Davidson, Zoo director here.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Services will be held today for Isaac Ash, a lawyer and one-time Inquirer chess editor, who died Saturday. He was 98 and lived in Center City. A 1908 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, he had been the oldest living alumnus of the school. He graduated from Central High School in 1904 at age 16. He spent his entire legal career in Philadelphia before retiring more than two decades ago. His proficiency in chess was such that he was state champion during the 1940s and played international chess matches through cable hookups to Oxford University.
NEWS
September 8, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Friendly, easygoing and bright, Joseph, 9, enjoys a variety of activities. Basketball, soccer, bowling and fishing are among some of his favorite pastimes. Challenging friends to a game of chess is another. He is also happily assured on the dance floor. Bible study and church services are other highlights of Joseph's week. Joseph is in fourth grade in special-education classes. He has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder that is helped by medication, and is in good health.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the New York Daily News and the Washington Post.)
World chess kingpin Gary Kasparov is donating part of the earnings from his coming world championship challenge match with Soviet countryman Anatoly Karpov to victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, Radio Moscow revealed yesterday. No money figure was mentioned. The match between the two will begin July 28 in London and will be completed in Leningrad. Twenty-six people died and almost 300 were hospitalized in the April 26 accident, according to official Soviet statistics. GOING TO YALE Yale University announced Tuesday that it has acquired the papers of Robert Penn Warren, America's first poet laureate.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Philadelphia's youngest chess players competed against hundreds of students in kindergarten through 12th grade at a statewide championship in Carlisle over the weekend and came home with more than 100 honors. The nonprofit After School Activities Partnerships (ASAP) sponsored 115 students at the Pennsylvania State Scholastic Chess Championships, and the group returned to Philadelphia with 102 trophies, medals, and awards. ASAP's chess champions will be recognized March 21 during the School Reform Commission's meeting at 440 N. Broad St. - Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Central High School 11th-grade student Joe Li carefully weighed his moves as he navigated rooks and bishops around the chessboard. As time wore on, Li's calculations paid off as he placed his opponent in checkmate. "Planning ahead is how to be a good chess player," said Li, who won his third-place match Wednesday in the Philadelphia Scholastic Chess League City Championships. Li was among 60 students who competed in the championship at the Phillies Diamond Club in Citizens Bank Park.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Like Rodney Dangerfield, they get no respect. They're called nerds and weirdos. They get no funding from anyone and have to pay their own expenses. They have three times the trophies that the football and basketball teams have, but no one yells and screams for days if they win the state championship. They've won it for the third time in four years and hardly anybody knows about it. But the members of the varsity chess team at Cherry Hill High School East take their game as seriously as the beefiest tackle or highest-flying forward.
NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Fairless Hills man was stabbed to death yesterday by his roommate after a disagreement over a chess match, the Bucks County District Attorney's Office said. Jerome Kowalski, 56, died at Frankford-Bucks Hospital from a stab wound to his neck. The suspect, Simon Andrews, 61, was being treated in the same hospital last night for a cut to his face that he allegedly received during a brief struggle with Kowalski. Assistant District Attorney David Zellis said the fight happened about 3 p.m. at their home in the Aspen Falls Apartments on Trent Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012 | Dan Gross
ALISA MELEKHINA didn't write her first children's book until she was 6, took two full years to graduate Drexel University, and only now, at age 20, is at Penn Law. What a slacker! The Rhawnhurst-raised Melekhina is off to St. Louis on May 8 to compete in the U.S. Women's Chess Championship. Melekhina, who has also been studying ballet since she was 6, says her father, Aleksandr, who taught her chess but soon after stopped playing against her because she kept beating him. The Ukraine-born Melekhina came with her family to the U.S. when she was 2 months old. They lived in Brooklyn until she was 5 and then moved to the Northeast.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
You may be thrilled by the feats of swimmer Katie Ledecky, mesmerized by the grace of the women gymnasts, startled by Rio spectators mocking U.S. soccer star Hope Solo with chants of "Zika! Zika!" (the first recorded instance, noted one wit, of a stadium rocking to the invocation of a virus). Allow me, however, to interrupt the prepackaged, heart-tugging, tape-delayed Olympic coverage to bring you the real sporting news of the year. It has just been announced that on Nov. 11 in New York City, the World Chess Championship will begin.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
A PAIR of interesting movies this year have looked at the Cold War from the standpoint of its proxy warriors. Reluctant warriors, often - men who excelled at chess or hockey and were drafted, often unofficially and against their will, into a high-stakes struggle between superpowers. The fascinating documentary "Red Army" looked at this dynamic through the eyes of the Red Army hockey team and its cagey leader, Viacheslav Fetisov. Now comes "Pawn Sacrifice," a weirdly trippy movie that recreates the monumental 1972 chess match between tormented American chess prodigy Bobby Fischer (Tobey Maguire)
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
RESISTANCE IS futile. The crew of the starship Enterprise in "Star Trek" learned this well. And so, too, did Mayor Nutter and former Mayors Ed Rendell and Wilson Goode Sr. - at least when it came to Marciene Mattleman. When Mattleman, the feisty and unrelenting advocate for Philadelphia's children, called the Mayor's Office to ask for the city's assistance with one of her many new educational ideas, some of which came to her in the middle of the night, resistance was, well, "impossible.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SCIENCE AND MATH teacher Jason Bui knew a few years back that he wanted to start an after-school chess club at S. Weir Mitchell Elementary, at 55th Street and Kingsessing Avenue, in Kingsessing. The pupils who joined the club - which he named the Minor Threats after the early-'80s hard-core punk band Minor Threat - had no idea that chess would have an impact on their minds, their attitudes and their families. "By the time we were the Minor Threats, I was already seeing an impact," said Bui, 33, who this year moved to Andrew Hamilton Elementary, on Spruce Street near 56th, West Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter met his match Saturday afternoon in a game of chess, beaten by one of Philadelphia's best players - 12-year-old Candida Layla Wilcox. She didn't hesitate to say why Nutter lost. "He wasn't really controlling the center, so he didn't really think long and hard on his first couple of moves," said Candida, an honor-roll student at the cyber charter school Commonwealth Connections Academy. "After I pinned him in, I got him in checkmate. " It took her less than 15 minutes to hand the mayor his defeat.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Ashley, the first African American international chess grand master, captivated a crowd of young chess players and coaches Friday with his story of perseverance, describing his rise from a tough Brooklyn neighborhood to the highest possible rank for competitors of their beloved game. The first lesson of greatness, Ashley told the 6- to 18-year-old players gathered at the National Constitution Center is sacrifice. He recalled learning that lesson from his mother, who left him and his siblings with their grandmother in their native Jamaica for 10 years while she worked in the United States to earn enough money to bring her children.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WENDELL M. WATIES was one of those old-fashioned doctors whom they just don't make anymore. He made house calls; he was on the sidelines at high school football games, ready to run out on the field when a player was hurt. He worked 12-hour days at his office on Girard Avenue at 58th Street, West Philadelphia, opening his doors at 7 a.m. and not going home until 7 p.m., or later. However, the weekends and vacation time belonged to his family. "He worked all those hours, but on the weekends he focused on us," said his daughter, Carol Waties.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  PHILADELPHIA Balla Dembele's eyes were glued to the chess board in front of him, a knight in one hand and a half-eaten, mustard-lathered pretzel in the other. As soon as he took his right thumb off the knight, his heart sank. He knew that he had just given the game to his opponent, District Attorney Seth Williams. "You made me sweat there a bit," Williams told Dembele, 11, as the two looked up and shook hands. "I caught a lucky break. " Dembele and Williams were among the more than 70 Philadelphia public-school students and District Attorney's Office staff who were on hand Tuesday afternoon for the annual Philadelphia Scholastic Chess League All-Star Match.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Desmond is a fun-loving, playful 8-year-old who enjoys running, and proudly declares that he can run fast. He also likes spending time with his friends, playing chess, and going to the beach. Reading is another favorite pastime, and he often can be found absorbed in a good book. He recently visited the Academy of Natural Sciences and was thrilled by the dinosaur exhibit - especially T. Rex. After the tour, he dug for bones and played with interactive tablets. It was a day he will long remember.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia students, including an eighth grader with a nationally certified master rating, captured 110 awards at the Pennsylvania State Scholastic Chess Championships this weekend. It was a big haul for the group of more than 130 youths, sponsored by After School Activities Partnerships, whose trip to the tournament in central Pennsylvania was paid for by the family of the late Philip Lindy, a longtime supporter of the chess program at ASAP. "We have 3,200 kids playing chess every week in Philadelphia," said Marciene S. Mattleman, founder of ASAP, which promotes after-school recreation and enrichment in the city's most underserved neighborhoods.
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