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Chess Master

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NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boris Baczynskyj, 62, of Center City, a journalist and a chess master who taught the game to thousands of children and adults, died of heart failure Jan. 16 at home. His death came a day before international chess champion Bobby Fischer's. Though the two never played each other, Mr. Baczynskyj told friend and sparring partner Mike Shahade that if he was stuck on a desert island, he would want his favorite book, Fischer's My 60 Memorable Games. In 1985, Mr. Baczynskyj wrote a summary and an appreciation for a published computer disk of Fischer's games.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Internationally, Bobby Fischer might have played some big ones, but last week, Cherry Hill resident Leroy Dubeck played the biggest chess match in South Jersey history at the grand reopening of Kings Highway in Haddonfield. A life master and past president of the United States and New Jersey Chess Federations, Dubeck played an ordinary chess match on an extraordinary board: 32 square feet, each space four feet square, laid out in the center of Kings Highway. The chessmen consisted of the cones, barrels and pylons that had guided traffic during the summer-long reconstruction of Haddonfield's main street.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stan Ritvin pulled a woolly brown cap over his eyes and slumped his 6-foot frame into the metal chair. "E4," he called to the student at the table behind him. Elizabeth Thrall, 14, slid a plastic pawn across the chess board in front of her - to Column E, Row 4 - and waited. Across the table, 4-foot-tall Jacob Read, 11, contemplated the board a moment, his chin in his hand, then slid his pawn into position. "E5. " Elizabeth announced Jacob's move and looked at the back of Stan's head.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AN UNDERFUNDED New York City middle school is the main focus of "Brooklyn Castle," the uplifting documentary story of how a chess program transforms the lives of inner-city students. Director Katie Dellamaggiore profiles Intermediate School 318, where teacher Elizabeth Vicary's after-school chess program had such a powerful effect on children that it became part of the curriculum and produced national champions. What becomes of a program so demonstrably successful and obviously effective?
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Man against machine. It's an age-old battle celebrated in fact and fiction: The car against the horse. Indians racing trains across the desert. Charlie Chaplin grappling with gears in a futuristic factory. Lucille Ball trying to keep up with a candy-making assembly line. John Henry against the steel-drivin' machine. And now it's a chess master against a computer. World chess champ Garry Kasparov has beaten computers before, but this time at the Pennsylvania Convention Center he is up against Deep Blue, a supercomputer, tougher and more implacable than the steel-drivin' machine that finally killed John Henry.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | By Christopher Merrill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Zachary White is not in it for the money, he says, though he wouldn't mind winning a couple hundred dollars. While the 11-year-old sixth grader at Valley Forge Middle School may not be ascending the income brackets, he is climbing the ranks in the world of chess. Zachary recently placed 17th out of 145 sixth graders in a national chess tournament in Louisville, Ky., and is ranked in the top 50 players for his age group in the nation. If you're thinking, "That's great, but they're just children" - don't.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Drew Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brett Chapman has the savvy of an entrepreneur and the build of a linebacker, but his college scholarship is for neither business nor ball. Instead, the West Philadelphia native earned his money by being one of the city's best at chess. Chapman, a senior at Science Leadership Academy in Center City, was one of five students honored for their prowess in after-school chess programs at a ceremony Tuesday afternoon in City Hall. Temple and Drexel Universities each will give $2,500 rewards to two players to attend, while the Community College of Philadelphia will give $1,000 to the fifth player.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 20 minutes of silent study, 12-year-old Danny Benjamin had finally uncovered the move that would win the Pennsylvania State Scholastic Chess Tournament. Pg5. Translation: Pawn to square g5. After that, it was all over. Match and tournament to Benjamin. The Dresher youth had become the victor in a 2 1/2-hour duel, capturing the state chess championship for pupils in sixth grade and earlier. Benjamin won the championship at the U.S. Chess Federation-sponsored tournament, held April 1 and 2 at Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pa. Benjamin was scheduled to compete this weekend in the National Elementary School Chess Championships in Tempe, Ariz.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
In a Cherry Hill health club Friday night, Michael Ko and dozens of others got a workout without even breaking a sweat. While others at the Fitquest Health Club grunted and groaned and stretched and sweated, Ko, 16, was one of about five dozen chess players who squared-off against three local masters simultaneously to kick off the first meeting of the Cherry Hill Chess Club. Under a glittering disco ball in the club's conference room, each master - musical chairs-style - played 20 matches at once by traveling around a rectangle of tables set with paper chess boards and black and white plastic regulation chess pieces.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Ashley, the first African American international chess grand master, captivated a crowd of young chess players and coaches Friday with his story of perseverance, describing his rise from a tough Brooklyn neighborhood to the highest possible rank for competitors of their beloved game. The first lesson of greatness, Ashley told the 6- to 18-year-old players gathered at the National Constitution Center is sacrifice. He recalled learning that lesson from his mother, who left him and his siblings with their grandmother in their native Jamaica for 10 years while she worked in the United States to earn enough money to bring her children.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AN UNDERFUNDED New York City middle school is the main focus of "Brooklyn Castle," the uplifting documentary story of how a chess program transforms the lives of inner-city students. Director Katie Dellamaggiore profiles Intermediate School 318, where teacher Elizabeth Vicary's after-school chess program had such a powerful effect on children that it became part of the curriculum and produced national champions. What becomes of a program so demonstrably successful and obviously effective?
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Drew Singer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brett Chapman has the savvy of an entrepreneur and the build of a linebacker, but his college scholarship is for neither business nor ball. Instead, the West Philadelphia native earned his money by being one of the city's best at chess. Chapman, a senior at Science Leadership Academy in Center City, was one of five students honored for their prowess in after-school chess programs at a ceremony Tuesday afternoon in City Hall. Temple and Drexel Universities each will give $2,500 rewards to two players to attend, while the Community College of Philadelphia will give $1,000 to the fifth player.
NEWS
May 9, 2010
Andor Lilienthal, 99, the last survivor of 27 original grand master chess players, died Saturday at his home in Budapest, Hungary. Mr. Lilienthal was born in Moscow to Hungarian Jewish parents, but moved to Budapest with his mother. He eventually competed for Hungary in three Chess Olympiads in the 1930s and later continued his career in the Soviet Union. He trained world champion Tigran Petrosian from 1951 to 1963, and was the second to Vasily Smyslov during his successful world championship matches against Mikhail Botvinnik.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boris Baczynskyj, 62, of Center City, a journalist and a chess master who taught the game to thousands of children and adults, died of heart failure Jan. 16 at home. His death came a day before international chess champion Bobby Fischer's. Though the two never played each other, Mr. Baczynskyj told friend and sparring partner Mike Shahade that if he was stuck on a desert island, he would want his favorite book, Fischer's My 60 Memorable Games. In 1985, Mr. Baczynskyj wrote a summary and an appreciation for a published computer disk of Fischer's games.
NEWS
October 20, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben and Ashwin Verghese INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Hands in his pockets, trailed by a jostling horde of photographers and reporters, Garry Kasparov strolled around a long row of tables in the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia yesterday, glancing over the shoulders of a few dozen Philadelphia teenagers engrossed in chess. They barely looked up. Few words were exchanged. The teens were in the presence of one of the greatest chess minds on Earth, but felt little more than the draft of fame as he passed by. While these two dozen students have studied some of Kasparov's strategies, much of his contribution to chess theory is beyond their grasp, at least for now, said Steven Shutt, a chess coach and teacher at Masterman School.
NEWS
November 22, 2003 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrance Manley acknowledged yesterday that he was being an ungracious victor, but just couldn't help himself. "I thought he was going to bring a good game, but he was a bum," Manley, serving time for manslaughter, snapped as his fellow chess-playing inmates at New Jersey State Prison laughed. "He couldn't handle me. This shows I'm the best player in here. " The defeat was suffered not by another prisoner, but by one of four Princeton University chess whizzes who went inside the penitentiary walls to challenge 58 inmates.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | By Christopher Merrill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Zachary White is not in it for the money, he says, though he wouldn't mind winning a couple hundred dollars. While the 11-year-old sixth grader at Valley Forge Middle School may not be ascending the income brackets, he is climbing the ranks in the world of chess. Zachary recently placed 17th out of 145 sixth graders in a national chess tournament in Louisville, Ky., and is ranked in the top 50 players for his age group in the nation. If you're thinking, "That's great, but they're just children" - don't.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stan Ritvin pulled a woolly brown cap over his eyes and slumped his 6-foot frame into the metal chair. "E4," he called to the student at the table behind him. Elizabeth Thrall, 14, slid a plastic pawn across the chess board in front of her - to Column E, Row 4 - and waited. Across the table, 4-foot-tall Jacob Read, 11, contemplated the board a moment, his chin in his hand, then slid his pawn into position. "E5. " Elizabeth announced Jacob's move and looked at the back of Stan's head.
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