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Chest Pain

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NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Millions of Americans suffer from recurring chest pain that is hard to explain and treat because it is not caused by their hearts. They often undergo extensive testing and end up on drugs for acid reflux, depression, or even lung disease. But only about 40 percent of noncardiac chest-pain patients respond to these drugs. And most still have painful symptoms, said Temple University gastroenterol-ogist Ron Schey. Now, he may have found a novel way to treat some of them: dronabinol, a synthetic form of marijuana.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Mark Benjamin M.D., For The Inquirer
A 20-year-old woman, who was overweight but otherwise healthy, started feeling an odd, dull pain in her chest. She hoped that if she put up with it for a few days, it might go away. But it didn't. So she went to see her family doctor, who immediately sent her to a cardiologist. She was given a stress test to see if exercise caused any changes in blood flow to her heart. The doctor also ordered an echocardiogram, which sends sound waves to the heart to measure the movement of the valves and heart muscle.
NEWS
February 19, 2015
A story in the Sunday Health section quoted cardiologist Eric Topol, author of the new book The Patient Will See You Now, incorrectly suggesting that readings from smartphone apps can substitute for a physical visit to the emergency room by a patient with chest pain. Topol clarifies that "the current apps diagnose heart rhythm issues, not heart attacks. "
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A noninvasive scan that looks inside cardiac arteries can rapidly and reliably rule out the possibility of a heart attack among many emergency-room patients complaining of chest pain, according to a study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. The findings provide the strongest evidence to date that "CT angiography" could relieve a diagnostic dilemma - how to efficiently distinguish patients who can safely be sent home from those who should stay in the hospital. About eight million annual ER visits are for chest pain.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia murder trial of "Black Madam" Padge-Victoria Windslowe is expected to resume Friday following her release from a hospital after treatment for chest pain. Windslowe is charged with third-degree murder in the 2011 death of a British dancer who had received silicone injections in a buttocks-enhancement procedure. Her trial was last in session last Friday. On Monday, Windslowe, 43, complained of chest pain and was taken from the city's prison system to an unidentified Philadelphia hospital.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | By Linda Herskowitz, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've heard it before, but the truth is worth repeating: Stress takes a physical toll. Members of the American Psychosomatic Society meeting this week in Philadelphia are counting the ways. Among the highlights of research by the interdisciplinary group of surgeons, internists, psychiatrists and psychologists meeting at the Sheraton Society Hill are several studies that explore the interaction of mind and body. One of the studies found that aerobic exercise was more effective than strength and flexibility exercise in reducing stress in "Type A" men whose heart rate rises in the face of a challenging task.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Rong Hu and John Stern, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. It was supposed to be a routine surgery. At least, as routine as surgery can be on the aorta - the largest blood vessel in the body, one connected directly to your heart, the one that carries all the blood going to every part of your body other than your lungs. The story started about two years ago, when a CT scan done for chest pain and difficult breathing showed that M.E. had an aortic aneurysm. An aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel - basically, part of the blood vessel begins to balloon and get wider.
SPORTS
April 3, 1997 | By Ken Sugiura, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Washington Township football coach Tom Brown suffered a mild heart attack and is at home resting after undergoing quintuple-bypass surgery last week. On March 25, Brown, 53, complained of chest pain and was admitted to Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Washington Township Division. He was transferred Thursday to the Graduate Hospital in Center City, where doctors performed the operation. He returned home Tuesday evening. Brown has his son Tom Jr. to thank for the early detection of his condition.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | By Steve Young
Hearts are good things. You should never forget how good. Especially on Valentine's Day. 'Cause if you do forget, your wife won't ever forget you forgot. There are other hearts that are even more important. They keep us alive. They pump blood and oxygen into important parts of the body. Without a heart we would die. Everybody has a heart. Even politicians. I swear. Even vice presidents. Sometimes a heart can make you sick. That is a bad thing.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
An official-sounding e-mail that's been sent around the world advising those struck by heart attacks to cough repeatedly is being vigorously refuted by cardiac experts. The e-mail chain letter, titled "How to Survive a Heart Attack When Alone," suggests coughing at regular intervals until help arrives. "Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating," the memo reads. "In this way, heart attack victims can get to a phone between breaths [and]
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NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia murder trial of "Black Madam" Padge-Victoria Windslowe is expected to resume Friday following her release from a hospital after treatment for chest pain. Windslowe is charged with third-degree murder in the 2011 death of a British dancer who had received silicone injections in a buttocks-enhancement procedure. Her trial was last in session last Friday. On Monday, Windslowe, 43, complained of chest pain and was taken from the city's prison system to an unidentified Philadelphia hospital.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE TRIAL OF "Black Madam" Padge-Victoria Windslowe did not continue yesterday because the defendant was hospitalized. Windslowe was taken to a hospital yesterday morning after complaining of chest pains, Philadelphia Prison System spokeswoman Shawn Hawes said. Windslowe, 45, was to resume testifying in her trial in connection with silicone butt injections she gave to two women, one of whom died shortly after receiving the injections. Yesterday morning, after attorneys met privately with Common Pleas Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi, a court crier told observers that the trial would not resume until the afternoon.
NEWS
February 19, 2015
A story in the Sunday Health section quoted cardiologist Eric Topol, author of the new book The Patient Will See You Now, incorrectly suggesting that readings from smartphone apps can substitute for a physical visit to the emergency room by a patient with chest pain. Topol clarifies that "the current apps diagnose heart rhythm issues, not heart attacks. "
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Millions of Americans suffer from recurring chest pain that is hard to explain and treat because it is not caused by their hearts. They often undergo extensive testing and end up on drugs for acid reflux, depression, or even lung disease. But only about 40 percent of noncardiac chest-pain patients respond to these drugs. And most still have painful symptoms, said Temple University gastroenterol-ogist Ron Schey. Now, he may have found a novel way to treat some of them: dronabinol, a synthetic form of marijuana.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Mark Benjamin M.D., For The Inquirer
A 20-year-old woman, who was overweight but otherwise healthy, started feeling an odd, dull pain in her chest. She hoped that if she put up with it for a few days, it might go away. But it didn't. So she went to see her family doctor, who immediately sent her to a cardiologist. She was given a stress test to see if exercise caused any changes in blood flow to her heart. The doctor also ordered an echocardiogram, which sends sound waves to the heart to measure the movement of the valves and heart muscle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013
SHE WANTED to rev up her fitness routine, but she didn't bargain for this. Theresa Conroy wanted to shake things up. The already fit 51-year-old yoga instructor and owner of Roxborough's Yoga on Ridge wanted to take her personal fitness to new levels and hoped to shed a few stubborn pounds in the process. "I run three or four times a week and teach five to six classes, plus my own practice, but I just wanted to spice it up," she told me. So she decided to go to a personal trainer for a 30-minute fitness evaluation that entailed pull-ups, explosive plyometric moves and suspension exercises.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Rong Hu and John Stern, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. It was supposed to be a routine surgery. At least, as routine as surgery can be on the aorta - the largest blood vessel in the body, one connected directly to your heart, the one that carries all the blood going to every part of your body other than your lungs. The story started about two years ago, when a CT scan done for chest pain and difficult breathing showed that M.E. had an aortic aneurysm. An aneurysm is a dilation of a blood vessel - basically, part of the blood vessel begins to balloon and get wider.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
DEAR ABBY : I'm a 20-year-old college student with a great job, life ambitions and parents who love me. A few months ago I met a wonderful young man who is in the Army. We met on the Internet, communicated online for several weeks, then took the next step to meet in person. "Jack" is 10 years older than I am and has a son from a previous marriage. I did a background check and everything he told me is true. But I'm afraid to introduce him to my parents. They are leery about people meeting on the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I was surprised to hear Rosie O'Donnell had a heart attack recently and initially ignored the symptoms she had because they weren't classic heart attack symptoms. Then I learned, women can have different symptoms from men when having a heart attack. Could you elaborate on the differences? Answer: Rosie developed heart attack symptoms after helping another woman get out of her car. She said she experienced chest pain, muscle soreness and nausea, which she initially thought might be due to a pulled muscle.
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