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NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Martha McDonald, Special to The Inquirer
Professionals who work in industry must make quality their number-one priority, corporate managers, industrial-technology specialists and students were told last week at Cheyney University's 10th annual Industry Day. Jan Gaudin, manager of quality programs at Boeing Helicopter Co. in Ridley, told them that "we need to always be dissatisfied with the level of excellence achieved. " Gaudin, the keynote speaker at the conference, said that "whatever we are doing today can be done better tomorrow.
SPORTS
September 11, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Osagie Osunde rushed for 182 yards and two touchdowns and freshman Alex Walsh kicked three field goals as West Chester tallied its first win over Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 18 years, 30-20, yesterday in West Chester. Osunde averaged 7 yards per carry and scored on a pair of 1-yard runs in the first quarter, while Matt Burdalski threw for 231 yards and one score for West Chester (2-1), which had more than 500 yards of total offense. IUP (0-2) got a pair of touchdown runs from Chris Morgan and a touchdown pass from Andrew Krewatch but couldn't overcome Walsh's school-record performance.
SPORTS
November 13, 2010 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In college basketball, there are no constants. Players arrive with a shelf life. Eventually, they're leaving - but usually not all at once. At Cheyney University, this season's women's team is brand new. There's not a returning veteran in the group. Cheyney coach Marilyn Stephens, in her third season at the school, knew this was coming - more or less. In 2009-10, eight of her 10 players were seniors. They lost another player to academics, and another decided to concentrate on track.
SPORTS
October 30, 1998 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mansfield's sports information director may have overstated things a bit when he spoke about the Mountaineers' football game tomorrow at Cheyney. "The game of the century will be played Saturday," Steve McCloskey said. Mansfield coach Joe Viadella was more reserved. His squad has won one of its last 19 games - 20-7 over Cheyney last year - and he does not want the losing to continue against a Wolves team riding the nation's longest winless streak (52 games). "No disrespect to Cheyney, but nobody wants to be the team that breaks the streak," Viadella said.
SPORTS
October 26, 1989 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The campuses of West Chester and Cheyney are separated by only six miles, but the football programs have been years apart. It's been 10 years, in fact, since Cheyney has been able to beat the Rams, a Division II powerhouse. Tomorrow at 7 p.m., the Wolves (3-5, 3-1) meet host West Chester (6-1, 3-0), which is ranked No. 9 nationally. It's a great chance for Cheyney to make West Chester pay for those 10 years of futility, and in the process, take sole possession of first place in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference East Division race.
SPORTS
November 24, 1987 | By Robert Seltzer and Dave Caldwell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bounce back from a 19-8 season? Yes, bounce back. Remember, Cheyney went 29-5 two years ago and reached the NCAA Division II Final Four. The Wolves should be strong again this season in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference, even though their top player, 6-foot-2 guard Clarence Green, will be lost for the first semester due to academic ineligibility - and even though coach Charlie Songster says his team is still a ship without a rudder. "I'm looking for somebody actually to take over and be a leader on the floor," said Songster, who has a five-year record of 105-40.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ask Cheyney University president W. Clinton Pettus the source for his latest ideas on how to better market the historically black college, and he'll likely say: "Israel. " Pettus returned last month from a weeklong trip to the Middle East thinking that Cheyney should try to define its niche back home more clearly - and target Latinos more aggressively as potential students. "As we looked at the institutions in Israel, we came to understand that they each had clearly defined their niche and their image, and that got me thinking about how often people in the United States raise questions about why historically black colleges continue to exist," Pettus said.
SPORTS
February 14, 1990 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer correspondents Robert McSherry and Paul Davies contributed to this story
A West Chester University assistant basketball coach remained hospitalized and two players and the team manager were recovering at home yesterday from injuries suffered Monday night in a brawl with two seconds left in a game against rival Cheyney at Cheyney's Cope Hall. Bernie Driscoll, 34, was listed in satisfactory condition at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Delaware County with a broken jaw and a concussion suffered when angry Cheyney fans stormed the floor near the end of the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference game.
SPORTS
March 8, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer
Cheyney shot 73 percent from the field in the second half to turn a tight game into a laugher last night as the Wolves advanced in the NCAA Division II Eastern Regionals with a 106-85 thrashing of Edinboro. In tonight's second round, Cheyney (27-4), ranked sixth in Division II, will meet host Gannon (25-5), a 78-66 winner over Millersville last night. The Wolves led 38-35 at halftime and fell behind for the only time in the game, at 41-40, with 18 minutes, 21 seconds remaining.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cheyney track coach Jim Washington is hoping that his teams' outdoor season will start better than the indoor season finished. The Wolves coach was hoping that both his men's and women's 1,600-meter relay teams would do well March 4 at the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference championships at Kutztown. But the Wolves' luck began to turn sour two days before the meet when sophomore Tony Dandridge banged into a hurdle and injured an ankle. Dandridge wasn't even part of the men's 1,600 team, but his injury was an omen.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Chester and Cheyney - two universities in the state's higher education system - are planning "a new level of collaboration" on academics and operations, their presidents announced this week in a joint e-mail to staff, students and alumni. Officials from both schools insist the move is not a precursor for a merger between Cheyney, a historically black university that has struggled financially, and nearby West Chester, which is growing and thriving. More than a year ago, West Chester officials had considered breaking off from the state system in part because they thought they were losing money to weaker schools.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In fall of her junior year, Travonya Kenly learned from her roommate of a marine biology program at Duke University that offered a full scholarship and gave special consideration to minority students. "Sure, I'll apply for that," responded Kenly, a student at Cheyney University, the historically black school in Chester County. She got in - one of two students in the country to be so honored - and traveled as far as Singapore to study. That wasn't the first time abroad for the student from Allentown.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Saddled with escalating debt and declining enrollment, Cheyney University - the nation's first college for black people - is in dire straits that will worsen unless the state takes "drastic action" to rescue the school, the state auditor general said Wednesday. The school's expenses exceeded its revenue in four of the last five years, and its deficit, already $12 million, will grow by an additional $5 million this academic year, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in a report.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE FISCAL health of Cheyney University, the nation's first historically black university, has deteriorated for five years and could worsen without immediate state intervention, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said yesterday. An audit released by DePasquale shows that the university has a $12.3 million deficit as a result of bad debt, declining enrollment and decreasing revenue from state aid, tuition and fees. The school projects an additional $5.5 million deficit this fiscal year.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A GROUP OF Cheyney University alumni, students and other advocates yesterday called for more funding for the nation's oldest historically black college and have filed a federal lawsuit against state and federal officials. The group, called "Heeding Cheyney's Call," contends that the state school has been a victim of decades-long discrimination. Cheyney "now has an all-time-low student enrollment and an all-time-high budget deficit," lawyer and advocate Michael Coard, a Cheyney alumnus, said at a news conference in front of the federal courthouse on Market Street near 7th. "What's the cause of that?"
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Cheyney University alumni and student group on Wednesday revived a decades-old civil rights lawsuit against the state and federal governments, claiming a lack of fair funding was starving one of the nation's oldest historically black schools. "We're here to remedy a long-standing policy of discrimination and failure to give the money [for] programs and quality of education at Cheyney University," said Junious Stanton, president of the Cheyney University National Alumni Association.
SPORTS
August 23, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University was placed on probation for five years by the NCAA on Thursday for multiple infractions regarding the university's lack of control over its certification process. From 2007 through 2011, Cheyney, the nation's oldest African American university, was found to have allowed 109 student-athletes to practice, compete, and receive travel expenses and athletically related financial aid before receiving their amateur certification from the NCAA. The Division II Committee on Infractions, which rendered the decision, also concluded that a former university compliance director did not follow proper procedures in the certification of student-athletes' eligibility.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University abruptly announced on Thursday the retirement of its president, Michelle R. Howard-Vital, and said her successor would take over Monday. Vital led the historically black university on the Delaware and Chester county line for seven years. The university's deficit has grown under her watch, and enrollment has not increased - trends that are exacerbating the school's already troubled position. "I think that Dr. Vital was absolutely an academician who did a lot of good things at Cheyney," said Robert Bogle, chair of Cheyney's board of trustees.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even after spending most of his life in a refugee camp, Frank Mulbah says he wants to go home. Not to the Liberia he fled as a child. But the one he sees in his imagination. Mulbah's vision is of a flourishing West African nation transformed from its civil-war past. Now a U.S. citizen, Mulbah, 28, will graduate from Cheyney University on Saturday. The political science major - who didn't set foot inside a school until he was 15 - will walk down the aisle to receive his bachelor's degree and toward an eventual future in Africa.
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