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Cheyney University

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NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE FISCAL health of Cheyney University, the nation's first historically black university, has deteriorated for five years and could worsen without immediate state intervention, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said yesterday. An audit released by DePasquale shows that the university has a $12.3 million deficit as a result of bad debt, declining enrollment and decreasing revenue from state aid, tuition and fees. The school projects an additional $5.5 million deficit this fiscal year.
SPORTS
August 23, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University was placed on probation for five years by the NCAA on Thursday for multiple infractions regarding the university's lack of control over its certification process. From 2007 through 2011, Cheyney, the nation's oldest African American university, was found to have allowed 109 student-athletes to practice, compete, and receive travel expenses and athletically related financial aid before receiving their amateur certification from the NCAA. The Division II Committee on Infractions, which rendered the decision, also concluded that a former university compliance director did not follow proper procedures in the certification of student-athletes' eligibility.
NEWS
July 22, 2008
Pennsylvania's own Cheyney University, founded in 1837, is the oldest historically black college or university in the nation. The school should not be allowed to follow the course of other such institutions into non-existence. But that possibility looms large. Cheyney is facing a backbreaking $2 million deficit, in part a result of dwindling enrollment. The university needs an infusion of administrative talent to help fledgling president Michelle Howard-Vital not just right the ship, but also steer it to safety.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Officials at Cheyney University urged students Friday to check their credit reports after an inadvertent release of their personal data, including Social Security numbers. The historically black college in Chester County apologized to students in a letter sent Friday. Cheyney said it was using a credit-monitoring firm to prevent misuse of the information. An administrative e-mail sent to all students on Thursday accidentally included a file with personal data, the university said.
NEWS
October 8, 2003 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cheyney University president W. Clinton Pettus, who stabilized the financially strapped state-run school but faced growing pressure to improve enrollment, has decided to step down at the end of the year. Some say that Pettus was unable to overcome the many problems left by previous administrations and a faculty that includes some who showed strong resistance to the kind of change that he and the university's trustees felt necessary. "Dr. Pettus tried very hard and faced many challenges," said Robert W. Bogle, chairman of Cheyney's trustee council.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the years, E. Sonny Harris, president of the Cheyney University faculty union, has not been one of the school's quieter figures. He has called the State System of Higher Education "racist" and in November orchestrated a faculty vote of "no confidence" in Cheyney's new president, LeVerne McCummings. But last week, it was a reserved and cautious Harris who pledged to "support any plan that enhances the university's position. " His caution was well-founded. On Tuesday, the board of governors of the State System of Higher Education (SSHE)
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tucked away on Page 593, midway through Gov. Corbett's budget proposal, are two lines that would mean little to most readers, but that could spell trouble for hundreds of students and graduates of Cheyney University. The spending plan would eliminate all funding for the Cheyney Keystone Honors Academy and the Bond-Hill Scholarships, two student-aid programs that last year together received about $2.4 million. Both were established as part of agreements in the 1980s and '90s between the state and the federal Office for Civil Rights, in an effort to erase the vestiges of segregation by enhancing programs and educational opportunities at the university.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's been on the job officially since July, but this weekend, W. Clinton Pettus will get a belated inauguration as the eighth president of Cheyney University, one of the oldest historically black institutions of learning in the nation. The four-day festivities began yesterday with an African American heritage lunch featuring sweet potato and smoked Louisiana sausage bisque, Southern-fried catfish fillets, and bread pudding. Concerts and academic symposia will lead up to the inauguration at 11 a.m. Saturday in Alfred Cope Hall.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
W. Clinton Pettus, Cheyney University's sixth president in slightly more than a decade, sees stability as the key to moving the nation's oldest historically black institution into the future. "I believe that the state would like to see us stabilize the administration here," said Pettus, who has served as the school's provost and vice president of academic affairs. "If you have people who are dedicated to the institution, you can begin to believe that you are truly a community. " His selection will be ratified tomorrow at a Board of Governors meeting of the state System of Higher Education.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NANCY MORGAN got a chance to try out her French during a reception in 2001 for French dignitaries in celebration of French support for the American Revolution 225 years before. As she presented a ceremonial bowl to French ambassador Francois Bujon de l'Estang, she said, "Vive la France. Vive l'Etats Unis. Vive l'alliance. Vive Philadelphie. " Then she impulsively added, "Vive l'amour!" Explaining why she added the expression of eternal love to her remarks, she said, "I cannot say the vives without saying, 'Vive l'amour.' " "Well," someone said, "we are the city that loves you back.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In fall of her junior year, Travonya Kenly learned from her roommate of a marine biology program at Duke University that offered a full scholarship and gave special consideration to minority students. "Sure, I'll apply for that," responded Kenly, a student at Cheyney University, the historically black school in Chester County. She got in - one of two students in the country to be so honored - and traveled as far as Singapore to study. That wasn't the first time abroad for the student from Allentown.
SPORTS
March 19, 2015 | BY AARON CARTER, For the Daily News cartera@phillynews.com
VAUGHN COVINGTON isn't shy on the basketball court, but you could call him offensively bashful. The 5-11 junior for Neumann-Goretti High is a pass-first, second and third point guard for the Saints. Before last night's Class AAA semifinal against Imhotep Charter, Covington had never topped the Saints in scoring in Catholic League play or the playoffs. He also only recorded double digits three times this season after only thrice last season. Against the Panthers, however, Covington's 21 points led the victorious Saints to a 75-67 triumph and another state title appearance.
SPORTS
March 19, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vaughn Covington isn't shy on the basketball court, but you could call him bashful on offense. The 5-foot-11 junior for Neumann-Goretti is a pass-first, -second, and -third point guard for the Saints. So much so that Covington had never led the Saints in scoring heading into the PIAA Class AAA semifinals Tuesday night. He had recorded double digits just six times in the last two seasons. Tuesday night, however, Covington's team-high 21 points led the Saints to a 75-67 triumph over Imhotep Charter and another appearance in the state title game.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, VINNY VELLA & WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
RANDOLPH SANDERS attended Kim Jones' birthday party over the summer and her funeral last month. He shook hands with her friends and family, wearing a smile or a furrowed brow, depending on the occasion. He might as well have been wearing a mask. On the morning of Jan. 13, Sanders, 36, allegedly put a bullet in Jones' head and calmly walked away - then dialed her phone number minutes later to check on her well-being. Sanders hadn't yet seen her that morning, he said on her voice mail.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Steinke, former general manager of the Reading Terminal Market, announced his bid Tuesday for an at-large City Council seat, calling himself a candidate with a track record of transforming the city for the better. Standing in front of the wide windows of a Center City bar across from the market he oversaw for 13 years, the Democrat said his life's work has been "creating growth and producing results. " "Our city deservedly is an international destination, known for its great history.
NEWS
December 25, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen F. Giles-Gee, the first African American and first female president of the University of the Sciences, has resigned after 21/2 years, the university announced Tuesday. Her resignation, which came as the 2,800-student campus was preparing to close for winter break, is effective next Wednesday, the university said. Giles-Gee was not available for comment, said university spokesman Brian Kirschner, who described the president's departure as a "personal decision. " "At this time, and after serious reflection, I have decided to leave University of the Sciences.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WHEN UNIVERSITY of the Sciences students return from winter break, they will have a new president. The university yesterday announced the resignation of Helen Giles-Gee after 2 1/2 years. Giles-Gee, who became the school's first female president and 22nd president overall when she assumed the post in July 2012, will step down Dec. 31. Board of Trustees chairman Marvin Samson will serve as interim president. "At this time and after serious reflection, I have decided to leave University of the Sciences," Giles-Gee wrote in a statement.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Saddled with escalating debt and declining enrollment, Cheyney University - the nation's first college for black people - is in dire straits that will worsen unless the state takes "drastic action" to rescue the school, the state auditor general said Wednesday. The school's expenses exceeded its revenue in four of the last five years, and its deficit, already $12 million, will grow by an additional $5 million this academic year, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in a report.
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