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Cheyney University

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NEWS
December 19, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE FISCAL health of Cheyney University, the nation's first historically black university, has deteriorated for five years and could worsen without immediate state intervention, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said yesterday. An audit released by DePasquale shows that the university has a $12.3 million deficit as a result of bad debt, declining enrollment and decreasing revenue from state aid, tuition and fees. The school projects an additional $5.5 million deficit this fiscal year.
SPORTS
August 23, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University was placed on probation for five years by the NCAA on Thursday for multiple infractions regarding the university's lack of control over its certification process. From 2007 through 2011, Cheyney, the nation's oldest African American university, was found to have allowed 109 student-athletes to practice, compete, and receive travel expenses and athletically related financial aid before receiving their amateur certification from the NCAA. The Division II Committee on Infractions, which rendered the decision, also concluded that a former university compliance director did not follow proper procedures in the certification of student-athletes' eligibility.
NEWS
July 22, 2008
Pennsylvania's own Cheyney University, founded in 1837, is the oldest historically black college or university in the nation. The school should not be allowed to follow the course of other such institutions into non-existence. But that possibility looms large. Cheyney is facing a backbreaking $2 million deficit, in part a result of dwindling enrollment. The university needs an infusion of administrative talent to help fledgling president Michelle Howard-Vital not just right the ship, but also steer it to safety.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Officials at Cheyney University urged students Friday to check their credit reports after an inadvertent release of their personal data, including Social Security numbers. The historically black college in Chester County apologized to students in a letter sent Friday. Cheyney said it was using a credit-monitoring firm to prevent misuse of the information. An administrative e-mail sent to all students on Thursday accidentally included a file with personal data, the university said.
NEWS
October 8, 2003 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cheyney University president W. Clinton Pettus, who stabilized the financially strapped state-run school but faced growing pressure to improve enrollment, has decided to step down at the end of the year. Some say that Pettus was unable to overcome the many problems left by previous administrations and a faculty that includes some who showed strong resistance to the kind of change that he and the university's trustees felt necessary. "Dr. Pettus tried very hard and faced many challenges," said Robert W. Bogle, chairman of Cheyney's trustee council.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the years, E. Sonny Harris, president of the Cheyney University faculty union, has not been one of the school's quieter figures. He has called the State System of Higher Education "racist" and in November orchestrated a faculty vote of "no confidence" in Cheyney's new president, LeVerne McCummings. But last week, it was a reserved and cautious Harris who pledged to "support any plan that enhances the university's position. " His caution was well-founded. On Tuesday, the board of governors of the State System of Higher Education (SSHE)
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tucked away on Page 593, midway through Gov. Corbett's budget proposal, are two lines that would mean little to most readers, but that could spell trouble for hundreds of students and graduates of Cheyney University. The spending plan would eliminate all funding for the Cheyney Keystone Honors Academy and the Bond-Hill Scholarships, two student-aid programs that last year together received about $2.4 million. Both were established as part of agreements in the 1980s and '90s between the state and the federal Office for Civil Rights, in an effort to erase the vestiges of segregation by enhancing programs and educational opportunities at the university.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's been on the job officially since July, but this weekend, W. Clinton Pettus will get a belated inauguration as the eighth president of Cheyney University, one of the oldest historically black institutions of learning in the nation. The four-day festivities began yesterday with an African American heritage lunch featuring sweet potato and smoked Louisiana sausage bisque, Southern-fried catfish fillets, and bread pudding. Concerts and academic symposia will lead up to the inauguration at 11 a.m. Saturday in Alfred Cope Hall.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
W. Clinton Pettus, Cheyney University's sixth president in slightly more than a decade, sees stability as the key to moving the nation's oldest historically black institution into the future. "I believe that the state would like to see us stabilize the administration here," said Pettus, who has served as the school's provost and vice president of academic affairs. "If you have people who are dedicated to the institution, you can begin to believe that you are truly a community. " His selection will be ratified tomorrow at a Board of Governors meeting of the state System of Higher Education.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Sure, Parth Chauhan likes providing unblemished, just-picked lettuce, kale, cilantro, and other herbs and vegetables to his South Jersey community. And although the 25-year-old is sold on the concept - "This is a way for us to be on the cutting edge of technology," he said - starting HomeGrown Farms was just as much about satisfying his desire to work with his lifelong best friends, Raghav Garg and Zeel Patel. Joint ventures are, after all, something the Eastern High School alums have always done well: selling candy bars and soda in middle school, hosting a dance for local high school students, and starting the Voorhees Youth Cricket League.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
A story Sunday on the growth of the King of Prussia mall area gave an incorrect number for the size of the retail sector. The mall expansion will add a half-million square feet of retail, taking the KOP area to 6.3 million square feet. An article in Thursday's Inquirer erred in describing Jayvon Mitchell-Pendleton, the 20-year-old man shot to death March 2 in the Swampoodle neighborhood, as an aspiring college student. Mitchell-Pendleton had been taking classes at Cheyney University since 2014.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For William Earle Williams, it was just a gate, distinct from the imposing stone pillars that flank the other entryways to Haverford College, but still just a gate. The limestone columns, with attached benches, along Old Railroad Avenue were graceful, light, and simple. They invited passersby to sit, rather than simply walk through. For decades, Haverford students, staff, and visitors had no idea that the Edward B. Conklin Memorial gate was the work of one of the nation's most influential and underappreciated architectural designers.
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
The reformed marijuana grower and the ex-Wall Street banker make an unlikely duo, working side by side in an old South Philadelphia factory building where - despite the chill outside - the air is warm, humid, and sweetened by hundreds of basil plants. Lee Weingrad, the grower, and Jack Griffin, the businessman, have great hopes for this "vertical" farm, where hydroponic herbs, microgreens, and tomatoes crowd together in troughs stacked almost to the ceiling. This is Metropolis Farms.
NEWS
January 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jacqueline Denny Starr, 91, of West Chester, a retired professor of home economics at Cheyney University, died Friday, Jan. 1, of respiratory failure at Cathedral Village in Philadelphia. Born in Reading, Mrs. Starr was the youngest daughter of Rosannah C. and Harold P. Denny. Known as "Jackie," Mrs. Starr grew up in West Chester and graduated from West Chester Senior High School. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in home economics from Cheyney University, and a master of arts degree in clothing and textiles from Columbia University.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IT WAS A BIZARRE CASE, to say the least. In June 2014, a son of abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell broke into a house near his family's Mantua home, stole an Xbox console and other electronics from the young men living inside, then returned a second time and ended up slashing one of the victims inside the house with a bayonet. Barron Alexander was then shot four times by another victim in the house, who had a license to carry a gun. Alexander had legally changed his name in 2012 from Barron Alexander Gosnell to Barron Alexander.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
He went so far as to legally change his name to escape the international notoriety of his father, the West Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell. What Barron Alexander could not change was the pressure of striving to do well in college as the son of a man dubbed a "monster" in charge of a "house of horrors. " On Monday, a Philadelphia judge accepted the assessment of Alexander's lawyer - a mental breakdown - and freed Alexander to begin eight years of probation for a June 2014 burglary of a house two doors from his mother's in the Mantua section of West Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University, which has been running a deficit and experienced a 30 percent enrollment drop this year, has been placed on probation by the body that accredits colleges and universities. The historically black university, on the boundary between Chester and Delaware Counties, has two years to correct financial concerns raised by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education or face losing accreditation. That loss would mean that the university's students no longer would be eligible for state or federal financial aid. Frank G. Pogue, interim president of Cheyney, and Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, of which Cheyney is part, said they were committed to fixing the problems.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission has found "probable cause" to suggest that Chestnut Hill College discriminated against a black student by expelling him for alleged theft while allowing white students suspected of theft and other offenses to remain enrolled. The college expelled Allan-Michael Meads in March 2012, weeks before he was to graduate, after disciplinary proceedings. The commission, in a "finding of probable cause" dated July 20, said it found no evidence to support that Meads "intended to deceive, steal, or misappropriate funds" collected from a student performance of A Raisin in the Sun to benefit the Lupus Foundation.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE AMERICAN Industrial Arts Association held its convention in Philadelphia in 1967, Mario Todaro, a board member, made 400 ceramic replicas of the key to Independence Hall and passed them out to members. A Cheyney University administrator who was attending was stunned. "Who is this guy?" he said. "We've got to have him!" That's how Mario, then an industrial-technology teacher at Upper Darby High School, became a Cheyney professor. Cheyney made him an offer he couldn't refuse.
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