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Chicago Blues

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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Magic Slim, the Mississippi-native guitarist and singer who died early Thursday in Philadelphia, for decades was a standard-bearer for Chicago blues. The bluesman, 75, died Thursday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, said manager Marty Salzman. Slim had been scheduled to play a show in Harrisburg in early February when he was stricken with bleeding ulcers. He was first treated at a hospital in Pottstown, then transferred to Jefferson two weeks ago for surgery. He also suffered from lung, heart, and kidney disease, and "it all turned out to be too much for him," Salzman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The blues were all over the Windy City, home of the urban blues, during the second weekend of June. As the seventh Blues Festival in Grant Park drew thousands to an all-day orgy of music, it was clear that the rootsy music that had seemed like history two decades ago has once more become a vital source of civic pride. Forget the Frank Sinatra song about that toddlin' town - this city's real theme is "Sweet Home Chicago. " Live blues has even become a valuable tourist attraction.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
It turns out Riley "Blues Boy" King wasn't the only Mississippi-born blues royalty gracing the Philadelphia area with a two-night stand last week. True, 82-year-old "reigning King of the Blues" B.B. delivered two sold-out shows at the Keswick Theatre, but the grizzled singer-guitarist Morris "Magic Slim" Holt and his longtime backing band the Teardrops held forth Friday and Saturday at the savvy South Columbus Boulevard R&B club Warmdaddy's for two sets each night. And 70-year-old Magic Slim was in fine fettle, more leaning back on his high stool than sitting, clad in gray shirt and slacks, head crowned by a modest black brim, squeezing out fiery runs of notes from the neck of his Fender Jazzmaster with his massive left hand as his right thumb and forefinger picked the strings.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jimmy Rogers played his shiny black electric guitar, closed his eyes and sang, "Give me what I want, little girl, and you won't hear me howlin' no more. " Almost 200 fans, some sitting on the floor at his feet cradling beer bottles, and some standing on chairs, swayed and nodded in time to the compelling beat and the wail of a harmonica. Wednesday night, the legendary Chicago bluesman sang about howling at the moon at La Trattoria East, a small Italian restaurant in West Chester with a blues club in the bar. Rogers is best known for the years he spent as second guitar to Muddy Waters in the '50s, when the two musicians were credited for inventing the Chicago Blues sound, a mix of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm played on electric guitars.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sound of his electric guitar rang out over Wembley Soccer Stadium, and as 69-year-old Jimmy Rogers began to sing a song he had composed, "Walkin' By Myself," his audience sang along. As a guest performer at the Rolling Stones blues tribute in June, Rogers provided the English crowd with authentic postwar Chicago blues, a combination of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm. It was the sound that he helped develop in the 1950s when he played with legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | By Kirby Kean, FOR THE INQUIRER
"If you want to tell us what to play, y'all got to come to rehearsal," quipped Taj Mahal at the Keswick Theater Tuesday night. Mahal was responding to persistent calls from the audience for the acoustic country blues on which he built his reputation. His remark was met with indulgent laughter - and walkouts. The 53-year-old bluesman used the evening to introduce his Phantom Blues Band, an eight-piece electric rhythm-and-blues and soul revue that was more Sam and Dave than Sleepy John Estes.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's seventh annual RiverBlues festival promises a raucous, hip- shakin' celebration of the blues, America's roots music that gave birth to modern pop. To quote Mississippi Delta/Chicago blues legend Muddy Waters: "The blues done had a baby, and they named him rock and roll. " There will be plenty of rockin' and rollin' this weekend with a lineup of big names playing nearly every style of blues, along with some flashy pop- rockers. RiverBlues offers something for everyone: the Robert Cray Band's sophisticated rock-soul-blues amalgam, Otis Rush's incomparable West Side Chicago guitar, Charles Brown's West Coast R&B piano and the high-energy slide guitar boogie of Lil' Ed and the Blues Imperials.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC This article includes information from the Associated Press
Junior Wells, the harmonica player and singer whose wrenching declarations made him one of the major performers of postwar Chicago blues, died late Thursday after a five-month battle with lymphoma. Mr. Wells, 63, had been seriously ill since September, when he had a heart attack and lapsed into a coma while being treated for lymphoma. The moody, soft-spoken Mr. Wells, who was born Amos Blakemore, spent his whole life around the blues. He grew up in Memphis, Tenn., and by the time he was 10 was studying harmonica with a neighbor, noted bluesman Junior Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Ladies and gentlemen, it's blues time in Philadelphia. Wednesday night at the Tower Theater, Stevie Ray Vaughan, a guitar strangler from Texas, will lead his band, Double Trouble, through a set that will conjure up work from guitarists as far afield as Freddie King and Jimi Hendrix. Vaughan, whose older brother Jimmie holds down lead guitar duties for the Fabulous Thunderbirds, is today's hotshot of choice for blues fans who put more credence in guitar solos than in singing. Chicago blues will be featured tomorrow night at the Chestnut Cabaret when Junior Wells and Buddy Guy show how it's done on the South Side of the Windy City.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Think of sad-eyed comic Alastair Sim as the Scottish Alec Guinness. In the marvelous Laughter in Paradise, he plays the nephew of a doddering practical joker (Hugh Griffith) who bequeaths wealth beyond dreams of avarice to four relatives - if they will perform mildly criminal acts. This charming film examines what otherwise socially responsible people will do for a wad of cash; in many ways, it anticipates the hilarity and hysteria of modern game shows. Sim stars in an inspired sequence, dutifully trying to get arrested and married - in that order.
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NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Magic Slim, the Mississippi-native guitarist and singer who died early Thursday in Philadelphia, for decades was a standard-bearer for Chicago blues. The bluesman, 75, died Thursday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, said manager Marty Salzman. Slim had been scheduled to play a show in Harrisburg in early February when he was stricken with bleeding ulcers. He was first treated at a hospital in Pottstown, then transferred to Jefferson two weeks ago for surgery. He also suffered from lung, heart, and kidney disease, and "it all turned out to be too much for him," Salzman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012
Jukebox the Ghost The quirky, uplifting piano-driven pop that Jukebox the Ghost released on their first album quickly earned them comparisons to artists like Ben Folds and They Might Be Giants (a subsequent tour with Folds probably cemented that comparison). Since their 2008 debut, the Brooklyn-based, D.C.-raised trio have released an additional two LPs, including this year's Safe Travels . Like its predecessors, its songs are energetic and heartfelt, with strong beats and a pop-rock sensibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
WE THOUGHT we were done with these ridiculous comparisons to Hitler . The latest person to go all Adolf on us? Kanye West . And the person he compared to Hitler? Kanye West. "I walk through the hotel and I walk down the street, and people look at me like I'm [expletive] insane, like I'm Hitler," he said while performing in England. "One day the light will shine through and one day people will understand everything I ever did. " Not everything. That statement, for instance.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
It turns out Riley "Blues Boy" King wasn't the only Mississippi-born blues royalty gracing the Philadelphia area with a two-night stand last week. True, 82-year-old "reigning King of the Blues" B.B. delivered two sold-out shows at the Keswick Theatre, but the grizzled singer-guitarist Morris "Magic Slim" Holt and his longtime backing band the Teardrops held forth Friday and Saturday at the savvy South Columbus Boulevard R&B club Warmdaddy's for two sets each night. And 70-year-old Magic Slim was in fine fettle, more leaning back on his high stool than sitting, clad in gray shirt and slacks, head crowned by a modest black brim, squeezing out fiery runs of notes from the neck of his Fender Jazzmaster with his massive left hand as his right thumb and forefinger picked the strings.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC This article includes information from the Associated Press
Junior Wells, the harmonica player and singer whose wrenching declarations made him one of the major performers of postwar Chicago blues, died late Thursday after a five-month battle with lymphoma. Mr. Wells, 63, had been seriously ill since September, when he had a heart attack and lapsed into a coma while being treated for lymphoma. The moody, soft-spoken Mr. Wells, who was born Amos Blakemore, spent his whole life around the blues. He grew up in Memphis, Tenn., and by the time he was 10 was studying harmonica with a neighbor, noted bluesman Junior Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | By Kirby Kean, FOR THE INQUIRER
"If you want to tell us what to play, y'all got to come to rehearsal," quipped Taj Mahal at the Keswick Theater Tuesday night. Mahal was responding to persistent calls from the audience for the acoustic country blues on which he built his reputation. His remark was met with indulgent laughter - and walkouts. The 53-year-old bluesman used the evening to introduce his Phantom Blues Band, an eight-piece electric rhythm-and-blues and soul revue that was more Sam and Dave than Sleepy John Estes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1995 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER Bruce Warren and Dan DeLuca also contributed
"Skatesnowsurfsound. " This motto appears on the cover of Warp, a California magazine that chronicles skateboarding lifestyles and culture. And this is the simple philosophy behind the Warped Tour (named for the publication), a traveling summer camp of sorts that mixes plenty of skate and sound and arrives in Camden Thursday. Warped mastermind Kevin Lyman organized a similar event last year, an AIDS skate-and-music benefit called Board Aid. The 33-year-old says that he got the idea for the tour from two related trends: a growth in young bands with loyal followings and the sports of skateboarding and snowboarding emerging from a marginal subculture of the '80s into what he describes as a "widespread lifestyle.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's seventh annual RiverBlues festival promises a raucous, hip- shakin' celebration of the blues, America's roots music that gave birth to modern pop. To quote Mississippi Delta/Chicago blues legend Muddy Waters: "The blues done had a baby, and they named him rock and roll. " There will be plenty of rockin' and rollin' this weekend with a lineup of big names playing nearly every style of blues, along with some flashy pop- rockers. RiverBlues offers something for everyone: the Robert Cray Band's sophisticated rock-soul-blues amalgam, Otis Rush's incomparable West Side Chicago guitar, Charles Brown's West Coast R&B piano and the high-energy slide guitar boogie of Lil' Ed and the Blues Imperials.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jimmy Rogers played his shiny black electric guitar, closed his eyes and sang, "Give me what I want, little girl, and you won't hear me howlin' no more. " Almost 200 fans, some sitting on the floor at his feet cradling beer bottles, and some standing on chairs, swayed and nodded in time to the compelling beat and the wail of a harmonica. Wednesday night, the legendary Chicago bluesman sang about howling at the moon at La Trattoria East, a small Italian restaurant in West Chester with a blues club in the bar. Rogers is best known for the years he spent as second guitar to Muddy Waters in the '50s, when the two musicians were credited for inventing the Chicago Blues sound, a mix of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm played on electric guitars.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sound of his electric guitar rang out over Wembley Soccer Stadium, and as 69-year-old Jimmy Rogers began to sing a song he had composed, "Walkin' By Myself," his audience sang along. As a guest performer at the Rolling Stones blues tribute in June, Rogers provided the English crowd with authentic postwar Chicago blues, a combination of tender Mississippi Delta blues and aggressive Chicago rhythm. It was the sound that he helped develop in the 1950s when he played with legendary bluesman Muddy Waters.
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