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NEWS
June 6, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam S. McKeel, publisher of The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, said yesterday that he would resign on Friday to become president and chief executive officer of the company that publishes the Chicago Sun-Times. McKeel, 62, has been operating head of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. (PNI) for more than 17 years, seeing the company through a battle for survival and subsequent rapid growth. On June 19, McKeel will join the Sun-Times Co., which owns Chicago's second-largest newspaper and two companies that publish a total of 56 small newspapers in Chicago's suburbs.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOROTHY STORCK had this thing about August. This is what the former Inquirer columnist had to say about August, written on Aug. 31, 1982: "Tomorrow is September. August will be all gone. We can come out of hiding, blink, maybe smile at a neighbor. We can take up our lives again as if August never happened. " Her point was that nothing good ever happened in August. Well, it's true, World War I began in August and Japan was hit by atom bombs in August, but as some readers pointed out, the Japanese surrendered to end World War II on Aug. 15. And anyway, Dorothy was just having fun, as she often did in her columns for the Inquirer from 1976 through 1987, when her column was distributed to some 250 newspapers nationwide.
SPORTS
October 16, 2006 | Inquirer wire services
Lou Piniella could become Dusty Baker's successor as manager of the Chicago Cubs before the World Series gets under way, ESPN.com reported yesterday. On Saturday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported that negotiations between the Cubs and Piniella, 63, could begin as early as today. Piniella, who has spoken to the Washington Nationals and Texas Rangers about their managerial openings, removed himself Friday as a candidate for the San Francisco Giants' job. In 2005, Piniella ended three difficult years as manager of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays and began working in television.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
IN LESS than a week, rumors about Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey being picked to run the Chicago Police Department have evolved into a serious possibility. A quick recap: March 9: Chicago newspapers report that Ramsey might be considered to replace outgoing Chicago Police Superintendent Jody Weis. Friday: "I have not been contacted by the [Rahm Emanuel] administration . . . I'm not actively seeking employment elsewhere," Ramsey tells 6ABC. Friday: The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Ramsey "told associates he would love to come home to run the Chicago Police Department.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
James C. Tyree, 53, the Chicago businessman who helped lead Sun-Times Media Group Inc. out of bankruptcy, died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after suffering an unexpected complication from cancer. Mr. Tyree announced in October that he had stomach cancer and would undergo chemotherapy. He also suffered from diabetes, and had kidney and pancreas transplants in 2006. In 2009, Mr. Tyree led an investment group that took the Chicago Sun-Times' parent company out of bankruptcy. Sun-Times Media, which also owns dozens of suburban Chicago newspapers and websites, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March of that year, after months of cost-cutting measures.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
Frank Calabrese Sr., 75, a Chicago hit man who strangled victims and then slashed their throats to be sure they were dead, died Tuesday in a federal prison in North Carolina, authorities said. Ed Ross, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons, had no information on the cause of death, though Calabrese claimed at his sentencing in 2009 that he suffered from a host of ailments, including an enlarged heart. "It's very emotional right now because there were two sides to my dad, and I miss the good side," Calabrese's son Frank Calabrese Jr. told the Chicago Sun-Times.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | By Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writer
Sam S. McKeel, the courtly, long-time chairman of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. and publisher of the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer, has surprised hundreds of his employees, corporate colleagues and civic friends by announcing his retirement, effective Friday. McKeel, 62, said he is leaving Philadelphia after 17 1/2 years to take the post of president and chief executive officer of the company that publishes the Chicago Sun-Times. No interim Daily News and Inquirer publisher is being named, and McKeel's successor may not be chosen for weeks and possibly months, said P. Anthony Ridder, president of the newspaper division of Miami-based Knight-Ridder Inc., owners of PNI. McKeel, speaking by telephone from Chicago, said his "proudest accomplishment" in Philadelphia "was being a part of - and only a small part of - a team that took a losing company with two very average newspapers, turning it into the largest company in Knight-Ridder and making them into two Pulitzer Prize-winning newspapers.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Don Babwin, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The Rev. Andrew Greeley, 85, an outspoken Roman Catholic priest, best-selling author, and longtime newspaper columnist who criticized the hierarchy of his church over the child sex-abuse scandal, died Wednesday at his Chicago home, according to his publicist, June Rosner. In a statement released Thursday through Rosner, Father Greeley's niece, Elizabeth Durkin, praised her uncle as a loving individual who "tremendously enriched" people's lives. "He served the church . . . with a prophetic voice and with unfailing dedication," she said.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Chicago mobster Frank Calabrese Sr., a hit man who strangled victims and then slashed their throats to be sure they were dead, has died in a federal prison in North Carolina, authorities said. Calabrese, 75, died Tuesday at the Butner Federal Medical Center, said Ed Ross, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Ross had no information on the cause of death, though Calabrese claimed at his sentencing in 2009 that he suffered from a host of ailments, including an enlarged heart.
SPORTS
March 22, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
FIFTY YEARS ago, Mississippi State's men's basketball team defied racist politicians by sneaking out of town to play in its first NCAA Tournament, against Loyola of Chicago, which started four African American players. Unwritten legislation, which prohibited any Mississippi state college from playing against a team that was segregated, stopped MSU from playing in the 1959, 1961 and 1962 tourneys, despite winning the Southeastern Conference in those seasons. But on March 2, 1963, MSU president Dean W. Colvard decided to end the disgrace and accepted the automatic bid to the tournament.
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NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DOROTHY STORCK had this thing about August. This is what the former Inquirer columnist had to say about August, written on Aug. 31, 1982: "Tomorrow is September. August will be all gone. We can come out of hiding, blink, maybe smile at a neighbor. We can take up our lives again as if August never happened. " Her point was that nothing good ever happened in August. Well, it's true, World War I began in August and Japan was hit by atom bombs in August, but as some readers pointed out, the Japanese surrendered to end World War II on Aug. 15. And anyway, Dorothy was just having fun, as she often did in her columns for the Inquirer from 1976 through 1987, when her column was distributed to some 250 newspapers nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* SIRENS. 10 p.m. tomorrow, USA. * CHICAGOLAND. 10 p.m. tomorrow, CNN. * SAINT GEORGE. 9 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   CHICAGO, increasingly television's kind of town, adds another series to its roster of locally filmed shows tomorrow with the premiere of USA's "Sirens," a wacky Denis Leary-produced comedy about EMTs. But the Windy City's true close-up will occur on CNN, with the launch of "Chicagoland," a documentary series from the Peabody Award-winning team behind Sundance TV's Newark, N.J.-focused "Brick City.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Don Babwin, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The Rev. Andrew Greeley, 85, an outspoken Roman Catholic priest, best-selling author, and longtime newspaper columnist who criticized the hierarchy of his church over the child sex-abuse scandal, died Wednesday at his Chicago home, according to his publicist, June Rosner. In a statement released Thursday through Rosner, Father Greeley's niece, Elizabeth Durkin, praised her uncle as a loving individual who "tremendously enriched" people's lives. "He served the church . . . with a prophetic voice and with unfailing dedication," she said.
SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
MIKE DITKA was a tenacious NFL player and coach. But now, it seems, he's gone soft. This past offseason, the NFL loosened its rules to allow home teams to use video boards and the like to pump up fans - a practice it once frowned upon because it was deemed unfair to the visiting team. "It's stupid," Ditka told the Chicago Sun-Times of the league's new stance. "The NFL . . . who are they appealing to? It would be like the owners working at their desk, and all of a sudden they encourage people to come in their office and make a lot of noise . . . The key to football is you want to be able to see it executed properly.
SPORTS
March 22, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
FIFTY YEARS ago, Mississippi State's men's basketball team defied racist politicians by sneaking out of town to play in its first NCAA Tournament, against Loyola of Chicago, which started four African American players. Unwritten legislation, which prohibited any Mississippi state college from playing against a team that was segregated, stopped MSU from playing in the 1959, 1961 and 1962 tourneys, despite winning the Southeastern Conference in those seasons. But on March 2, 1963, MSU president Dean W. Colvard decided to end the disgrace and accepted the automatic bid to the tournament.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Chicago mobster Frank Calabrese Sr., a hit man who strangled victims and then slashed their throats to be sure they were dead, has died in a federal prison in North Carolina, authorities said. Calabrese, 75, died Tuesday at the Butner Federal Medical Center, said Ed Ross, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Ross had no information on the cause of death, though Calabrese claimed at his sentencing in 2009 that he suffered from a host of ailments, including an enlarged heart.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
Frank Calabrese Sr., 75, a Chicago hit man who strangled victims and then slashed their throats to be sure they were dead, died Tuesday in a federal prison in North Carolina, authorities said. Ed Ross, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons, had no information on the cause of death, though Calabrese claimed at his sentencing in 2009 that he suffered from a host of ailments, including an enlarged heart. "It's very emotional right now because there were two sides to my dad, and I miss the good side," Calabrese's son Frank Calabrese Jr. told the Chicago Sun-Times.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
James C. Tyree, 53, the Chicago businessman who helped lead Sun-Times Media Group Inc. out of bankruptcy, died Wednesday at a Chicago hospital after suffering an unexpected complication from cancer. Mr. Tyree announced in October that he had stomach cancer and would undergo chemotherapy. He also suffered from diabetes, and had kidney and pancreas transplants in 2006. In 2009, Mr. Tyree led an investment group that took the Chicago Sun-Times' parent company out of bankruptcy. Sun-Times Media, which also owns dozens of suburban Chicago newspapers and websites, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March of that year, after months of cost-cutting measures.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
IN LESS than a week, rumors about Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey being picked to run the Chicago Police Department have evolved into a serious possibility. A quick recap: March 9: Chicago newspapers report that Ramsey might be considered to replace outgoing Chicago Police Superintendent Jody Weis. Friday: "I have not been contacted by the [Rahm Emanuel] administration . . . I'm not actively seeking employment elsewhere," Ramsey tells 6ABC. Friday: The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Ramsey "told associates he would love to come home to run the Chicago Police Department.
NEWS
August 10, 2008 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actor and comedian Bernie Mac, 50, who won acclaim and affection as the goggle-eyed grump with the wise heart, died yesterday in Chicago of complications from pneumonia, his publicist Danica Smith said in a statement. Whether doing stand-up comedy, television or movies, Mr. Mac knew how to get the attention of an audience. He was a star among a new generation of African American comedians, featured with D.L. Hughley, Steve Harvey and Cedric the Entertainer in Spike Lee's 2000 documentary, The Original Kings of Comedy.
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