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Chichester School District

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NEWS
May 8, 2003 | By Harold Kurtz
I was most distraught to read of the tragic suicide of Dr. Edwin Meyer, superintendent of the Chichester School District, on April 18. This story really resonated with me, as I am a retired school superintendent. During my 17 years in that position, I worked with many school board members and solicitors who represented the best in volunteerism and professionalism. Having said that, I have also been victimized by the same type of perfidy that seems to have driven Dr. Meyer over the edge.
NEWS
December 16, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Chichester School District employee responsible for paying district bills pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $63,000 in school funds yesterday. Jennifer Patricia Wilson, 33, of Bear, Del., was an accounts-payable specialist for the district, which serves 3,700 students in lower Delaware County. "Other than salary, everything went through her," said Roberta Gruber, business-operations adviser for the school district. Gruber said the discrepancy was discovered during a routine audit.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The donnybrook shaping up in the Chichester School District over an early-bird five-year extension of the teachers' contract reached in September is more than just a parting of minds over how the district should be run. Angry taxpayers are combining vigilance with a grass-roots mandate to become watchdogs in the district. Armed with pie charts and their own statistics, the most prominent of these groups are succeeding in imposing their agenda on the district, discomfiting board members and many residents alike.
NEWS
September 16, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bowing to restrictions imposed by Pennsylvania's first-class township code, Upper Chichester's commissioners said last week that they have no authority to lend their financial backing to a private appeal to realign the Chichester School District. In a decision rendered at a heavily attended town meeting Thursday, Robert F. Pappano, a special acting solicitor, told the commissioners that they had "no inherent powers" to intervene in what is essentially a school board matter. He argued before a skeptical audience that as a municipal corporation, the township could not reasonably claim a direct stake in the school board conflict.
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Commissioners in this, the second largest town in the Chichester School District, have tepidly embraced a court-mandated plan that would cede a voting majority on the school board to Upper Chichester, the district's largest town. "We'll have a voice in that system," Joseph McGinn, the commissioners' vice president, told a packed township board meeting Monday evening. Lower Chichester retains its two seats on the nine-member school board. McGinn's cautious praise marked a departure from the vitriol that has characterized the realignment dispute in this sorely divided, four-town district.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a young woman flush with first love, Patricia Ann Miller drove west from Philadelphia with her boyfriend, past a blighted landscape of "endless oil tanks," "strange smells" and factories, she recalled. But in Marcus Hook: A Pictorial Landscape, a 143-page ode to grit and good times in her Delaware River hometown, Miller transformed this landscape into a young girl's Shangri-la: a cozy warren of iron girders, hooting tugboats, and "old women who sit on porches with pretty flower gardens and cute little dogs.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Behavior in Chichester district was a disgrace Bravo to Bob Martin for his powerful commentary April 23 ("Chichester should review its treatment of superintendent") about the witch-hunt in the Chichester School District and Superintendent Ed Meyer's suicide. What an absolute disgrace that solicitor Terry Silva was allowed by the school board to treat Dr. Meyer with such total disdain and disrespect. I'd like to see her endure the grilling that Dr. Meyer did. If Ms. Silva had such a solid case, then why did it cost the district $250,000 in legal fees without any wrongdoing being proved?
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If a house divided against itself cannot stand, then what about four town halls, one school board, and two dozen fractious commissioners divided against one another within a teetering edifice called the Chichester School District? What began as a little-noticed move by a board member to mold his school district in his constituents' image has mushroomed into a legal battle with no end in sight. Commissioners in Upper Chichester voted unanimously Thursday to "intervene" in a petition by school board member Henry W. "Bud" Buchholz Jr. that seeks to revamp the makeup of the school board and would be likely to increase the township's representation on that board.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One side argued that the quickest way to rectify the growing imbalance on the Chichester school board would be to switch from regional representation to at-large selection of members. The other suggested a one-seat shift in representation, saying an at-large plan could deprive the district's smaller towns of any representation on the board. The arguments yesterday before Delaware County Judge Joseph F. Battle Jr. marked the latest chapter in an ongoing dispute that has turned the four-town Chichester School District into a divided camp.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Trainer Elementary School in the Chichester School District is boarded up, vacant - and quiet. But the sounds of children reciting lessons and playing in the schoolyard soon will be heard again. This summer, renovations are expected to begin at the school. Chichester officials hope the building will be ready to accept 180 students in late December or early January. The Trainer school was closed in 1984 after the district renovated two other elementary schools, Boothwyn and Marcus Hook.
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NEWS
June 15, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 34 years living in a four-bedroom brick home on a leafy acre in Radnor Township, retirees Karl and Jean Dorschu wanted something smaller, something with less raking and snow shoveling, something less taxing, physically and financially. They chose to stay in Delaware County, buying a $325,000 two-bedroom house in the Boothwyn section of Upper Chichester Township, 20 miles away. There, they assumed, their property tax would be much lower than the $7,000 they paid in Radnor.
NEWS
December 16, 2006 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Chichester School District employee responsible for paying district bills pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $63,000 in school funds yesterday. Jennifer Patricia Wilson, 33, of Bear, Del., was an accounts-payable specialist for the district, which serves 3,700 students in lower Delaware County. "Other than salary, everything went through her," said Roberta Gruber, business-operations adviser for the school district. Gruber said the discrepancy was discovered during a routine audit.
NEWS
September 8, 2004
The tale of Chichester schools governance during the last couple of years reads like a cheap novel. It had all the elements: love, death, crime, mystery, betrayal. One big difference: In real life, real people - adults and children - get hurt. The brawling that took place among Chichester's school officials hurt individuals and it hurt a school system that would have done better to use all that attention, energy and money to improve a spotty education record. The Chichester school board finally fired former school district solicitor Terry Silva, after she had spent tens of thousands of dollars persecuting then-Superintendent Edwin Meyer, who ended up taking his own life.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After weeks of angry calls from Chichester School District residents to fire Solicitor Terry Silva in the aftermath of the suicide of Superintendent Edwin Meyer, it appears the school board is moving toward doing just that. Three of the current eight board members said they would vote in a special session to remove Silva. Both candidates for appointment to the vacant ninth position said they would vote to fire her. The fifth and deciding vote would belong to board member Michelle Conte.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | By Harold Kurtz
I was most distraught to read of the tragic suicide of Dr. Edwin Meyer, superintendent of the Chichester School District, on April 18. This story really resonated with me, as I am a retired school superintendent. During my 17 years in that position, I worked with many school board members and solicitors who represented the best in volunteerism and professionalism. Having said that, I have also been victimized by the same type of perfidy that seems to have driven Dr. Meyer over the edge.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Behavior in Chichester district was a disgrace Bravo to Bob Martin for his powerful commentary April 23 ("Chichester should review its treatment of superintendent") about the witch-hunt in the Chichester School District and Superintendent Ed Meyer's suicide. What an absolute disgrace that solicitor Terry Silva was allowed by the school board to treat Dr. Meyer with such total disdain and disrespect. I'd like to see her endure the grilling that Dr. Meyer did. If Ms. Silva had such a solid case, then why did it cost the district $250,000 in legal fees without any wrongdoing being proved?
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By Tina Moore and Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
More than 600 residents of the Chichester School District packed a meeting hall last night, applauding and hollering support for speakers calling for the ouster of District Solicitor Terry Silva. They filled the nearly 500 seats at the Reliance Fire Company banquet hall in Boothwyn, Delaware County, and stood wherever there was room, including in the aisles and outside. Many at the meeting said they decided to get involved after Superintendent Edwin Meyer committed suicide over the Easter weekend in the middle of school board termination hearings.
NEWS
April 22, 2003 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It had been an ugly scene for some time in the Chichester School District - the power struggle between the school superintendent and the solicitor, the allegations of mismanagement and wrongdoing on both sides, a deeply divided board. But nobody could have anticipated this. Schools Superintendent Edwin Meyer put a shotgun to his neck and pulled the trigger. His body was found Sunday in Centreville, Del. He killed himself in the middle of a series of four public hearings that would determine whether he remained in charge of the 3,700-pupil school district in southeastern Delaware County that he had headed for four years.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Chichester School District's proposed 1999-2000 school budget would not increase property taxes, thanks largely to a one-time cash infusion from the refinancing of a school-construction loan. Taxpayers who heard the proposal at a special school board meeting Tuesday night at Chichester Middle School gave the district's financial consultant, Robert J. Davey 3d, a standing ovation and screams of "Hooray!" The district has had a steady dose of tax increases, amounting to a 68 percent rise over the last eight years.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | By Lisa Sandberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though others may be participating in a lackluster primary Tuesday, voters in the Chichester School District have a larger task at hand: Electing a new school board that will shift political power from the district's three "Lower End" towns to its more affluent and populous neighbor - Upper Chichester. The contest, in which 13 people seek nine realigned seats on the school board, is not a creature of state election law but rather the result of a federal court ruling. The U.S. District Court in Philadelphia found that Upper Chichester was underrepresented by the old configuration and set the special election to elect members with a new, tri-regional apportionment plan.
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