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Chicken Noodle

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BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30 years, Campbell Soup Co. has tried to sell chicken noodle soup in Mexico, and for 30 years the Mexican consumer has said, "No me gusta. " Finally, said Robert F. Bernstock, president of Campbell's international division, Campbell got the message that Mexican consumers don't like chicken noodle and the company now is creating a line of soups made to please the Mexican palate. Chile Poblana, a Mexican chile pepper soup, was introduced in Mexico a year ago. Calabaza, a cream of pumpkin soup, was added more recently.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Campbell Soup has launched a line of condensed soups that contain one-third less salt than its regular soups. The sodium content of the new soups, which are called "Special Request," will fall between the levels of salt in Campbell's regular soups and in its low-sodium soups for people on salt-restricted diets. Over the years, Campbell's has been the target of protests by consumer groups who say its soups are too high in sodium. A company spokesman, David C. Hackney, said the new soups, which have been under development for 10 years, should answer those concerns.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1988 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nobody ever questioned your mother when she said chicken soup would cure your ailments. But when Campbell Soup Co. pitches the health benefits of its products, that is another matter. Indeed, one consumer group alleges that Campbell has been using "false and dangerously misleading" advertising. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a Washington-based watchdog group, yesterday petitioned the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Campbell's advertising practices.
FOOD
October 6, 1993 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Progresso Healthy Classics Soups. Chicken rice with vegetables, chicken noodle, minestrone, lentil and vegetable. $1.19 to $1.59 per 16-ounce can. Bonnie: Although Campbell's soups always seem the most comforting to me (probably because it's the brand my mom served me when I was sick), Progresso's reputation is synonymous with good taste - for a canned soup, that is. And I must admit that I was impressed with the taste of its new Healthy Classics line. The first five flavors to become nationally available are nutritionally comparable to ones in Campbell's Healthy Request and Con Agra's Healthy Choice lines.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2000 | By Rosland Briggs-Gammon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co. said yesterday that earnings for its fiscal third quarter were "unacceptable," and announced a renewed focus on its main brands to improve financial performance. The Camden company said profits fell 14 percent from the 1999 quarter to $139 million, or 32 cents a share, although it still beat analysts' earnings projections by a penny a share. Sales declined 7 percent, and Campbell said that was mostly because Americans bought 9 percent less soup in the third quarter than a year ago. The company warned that, if the trend continued, earnings per share for fiscal 2000, which will end in August, could be 8 cents to 12 cents below the $1.76 average estimate of analysts polled by First Call/Thomson Financial.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1990 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer Reuters contributed to this report
While other chief executive officers may be shuddering at the thought of an impending recession, Campbell Soup's David Johnson is pleased to offer them a dry shoulder to cry on and a cup of soup. Johnson, a perennially flushed Australian who seems to be turning around the under-performing Camden food company, said yesterday that the soup business may be helped by a sluggish economy. "We may see some improved sales," he said, following the company's decidedly upbeat annual meeting in Cherry Hill.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, Progresso Quality Foods Corp. has been making soup in Vineland - practically in the backyard of Campbell Soup Co., the world's biggest soup-maker. Few have noticed the proximity of the fierce competitors because Progresso went through a succession of five corporate owners with distant headquarters since being sold in 1969 by the founding Taormina family. But Vineland - situated amid the rich South Jersey farmland that attracted both Progresso and Camden's Campbell - has remained Progresso's home base, where products have been developed and where the majority of Progresso soup is still made.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co.'s fourth-quarter net income jumped 63 percent on strong sales of condensed soup and the absence of charges from the year before, the Camden company reported yesterday. Quarterly sales climbed to $1.5 billion, up 5 percent from $1.4 billion last year. Net income was $96 million, compared to $59 million in last year's quarter, which included $16 million in net after-tax charges for restructuring and the sale of an idle factory. Earnings per share were 23 cents, compared to 14 cents last year.
FOOD
February 1, 2013 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
If it hasn't already happened to you, get ready. Even five minutes of casual news watching will alert you: This is the worst cold and flu season in recent memory. The sneezing that punctuates an unusually thick fatigue was my first clue that I was among the ill. Actually, my already-infected husband, sick a full week before I was, foretold the cold. Before I succumbed to the worst of it, something had to be done. I needed to make a lot of chicken soup for some serious symptom relief.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | BY KATHY O'CONNELL
I'm not sure when kids and their thoughts became important. Maybe the Beatles brought it with them. Maybe Maria Montessori put something into the water. For whatever reason, kids are no longer just "saying the darndest things. " They are expressing feelings, hopes, anger and opinions on issues ranging from their favorite soup to the plight of the homeless to how they would run the city. And they are not at all shy about educating adults about what they've been doing wrong. As host of Kid's Corner, a live call-in radio show for children, I get an earful of kids' ideas, opinions, advice and impressions, often startling in their humor, insight and wisdom, always strongly felt and argued.
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FOOD
February 1, 2013 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
If it hasn't already happened to you, get ready. Even five minutes of casual news watching will alert you: This is the worst cold and flu season in recent memory. The sneezing that punctuates an unusually thick fatigue was my first clue that I was among the ill. Actually, my already-infected husband, sick a full week before I was, foretold the cold. Before I succumbed to the worst of it, something had to be done. I needed to make a lot of chicken soup for some serious symptom relief.
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Thanks to inventor Momofuku Ando, we know what ramen isn't . Once a humble but hearty soup exported from China to Japan, ramen became lumped into a category of cheap instant-noodle dishes packed with a lab's worth of chemicals. But just as the American public has rediscovered hamburgers after decades of eating cheap, corrupted versions from the fast-food giants, made-from-scratch ramen is enjoying a new spot on restaurant menus. Three recent developments stand to elevate ramen's stature further in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pair of oversize gloves doesn't make sign language any easier. With your fingers inside flimsy, opaque plastic that flutters and clings, the sign for chicken might look like true. And did she just sign water or what's wrong? But if the food-service gloves were a modest inconvenience, none of the volunteers at the Aid for Friends outreach center in Northeast Philadelphia yesterday seemed to mind. They were there to prepare food and food-service trays for sick and elderly shut-ins.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co.'s fourth-quarter net income jumped 63 percent on strong sales of condensed soup and the absence of charges from the year before, the Camden company reported yesterday. Quarterly sales climbed to $1.5 billion, up 5 percent from $1.4 billion last year. Net income was $96 million, compared to $59 million in last year's quarter, which included $16 million in net after-tax charges for restructuring and the sale of an idle factory. Earnings per share were 23 cents, compared to 14 cents last year.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, Progresso Quality Foods Corp. has been making soup in Vineland - practically in the backyard of Campbell Soup Co., the world's biggest soup-maker. Few have noticed the proximity of the fierce competitors because Progresso went through a succession of five corporate owners with distant headquarters since being sold in 1969 by the founding Taormina family. But Vineland - situated amid the rich South Jersey farmland that attracted both Progresso and Camden's Campbell - has remained Progresso's home base, where products have been developed and where the majority of Progresso soup is still made.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2000 | By Rosland Briggs-Gammon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co. said yesterday that earnings for its fiscal third quarter were "unacceptable," and announced a renewed focus on its main brands to improve financial performance. The Camden company said profits fell 14 percent from the 1999 quarter to $139 million, or 32 cents a share, although it still beat analysts' earnings projections by a penny a share. Sales declined 7 percent, and Campbell said that was mostly because Americans bought 9 percent less soup in the third quarter than a year ago. The company warned that, if the trend continued, earnings per share for fiscal 2000, which will end in August, could be 8 cents to 12 cents below the $1.76 average estimate of analysts polled by First Call/Thomson Financial.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 30 years, Campbell Soup Co. has tried to sell chicken noodle soup in Mexico, and for 30 years the Mexican consumer has said, "No me gusta. " Finally, said Robert F. Bernstock, president of Campbell's international division, Campbell got the message that Mexican consumers don't like chicken noodle and the company now is creating a line of soups made to please the Mexican palate. Chile Poblana, a Mexican chile pepper soup, was introduced in Mexico a year ago. Calabaza, a cream of pumpkin soup, was added more recently.
FOOD
October 6, 1993 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Progresso Healthy Classics Soups. Chicken rice with vegetables, chicken noodle, minestrone, lentil and vegetable. $1.19 to $1.59 per 16-ounce can. Bonnie: Although Campbell's soups always seem the most comforting to me (probably because it's the brand my mom served me when I was sick), Progresso's reputation is synonymous with good taste - for a canned soup, that is. And I must admit that I was impressed with the taste of its new Healthy Classics line. The first five flavors to become nationally available are nutritionally comparable to ones in Campbell's Healthy Request and Con Agra's Healthy Choice lines.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1990 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer Reuters contributed to this report
While other chief executive officers may be shuddering at the thought of an impending recession, Campbell Soup's David Johnson is pleased to offer them a dry shoulder to cry on and a cup of soup. Johnson, a perennially flushed Australian who seems to be turning around the under-performing Camden food company, said yesterday that the soup business may be helped by a sluggish economy. "We may see some improved sales," he said, following the company's decidedly upbeat annual meeting in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | BY KATHY O'CONNELL
I'm not sure when kids and their thoughts became important. Maybe the Beatles brought it with them. Maybe Maria Montessori put something into the water. For whatever reason, kids are no longer just "saying the darndest things. " They are expressing feelings, hopes, anger and opinions on issues ranging from their favorite soup to the plight of the homeless to how they would run the city. And they are not at all shy about educating adults about what they've been doing wrong. As host of Kid's Corner, a live call-in radio show for children, I get an earful of kids' ideas, opinions, advice and impressions, often startling in their humor, insight and wisdom, always strongly felt and argued.
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