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Chicken Pox

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NEWS
February 23, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
With federal approval near for a chicken pox vaccine, it looks as if one of childhood's most uncomfortable diseases may soon be only a memory. But for 700,000 to 900,000 Americans each year, chicken pox is more than a memory, returning as shingles and bringing shooting pain, blisters and, occasionally, more serious problems. Alicia Wickliffe remembers chicken pox. "I had it really bad. " She's been told she had the rash everywhere, including her mouth. But what she remembers is that her mother came home from the hospital with a new baby 6- year-old Alicia wasn't allowed to see. But Wickliffe, a training manager with the School District of Philadelphia's food services division, recalls shingles vividly.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Chicken pox, which usually appear in the late winter and early spring, have hatched early this year. There have been spottings in South Philadelphia and Delaware County. The chicken pox virus is spread through the air or by physical contact. Most chicken pox sufferers are elementary school kids, although no age is immune. But once you've had the disease, you won't get it again. The first sign of chicken pox is usually a rash on the chest, back, shoulders, face and scalp. Over the course of a few days, the blisters dry and form scabs.
NEWS
January 4, 2005 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly a decade after a new chicken pox vaccine began driving down the number of children getting the itchy red spots, the federal government now has an even more ambitious goal: to eliminate the disease from this country. But to help get there, it might mean giving children a second shot of the vaccine. That would be good news for the vaccine's maker, Merck & Co. But some doctors wonder if it would be worth the cost and effort of adding another shot in a crowded vaccination program.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five infants at the Cambridge School at Baldwin in Bryn Mawr have been diagnosed with chicken pox, the Montgomery County Health Department announced Tuesday afternoon. Harriet Morton, the department's spokeswoman, said the five cases were reported Monday. The report triggered a medical investigation that was ongoing Tuesday, Morton said. Because of the five cases, 11 other children at the school who were exposed to the sick infants, and had not vaccinated against the childhood illness, will be kept home from school, she said.
NEWS
April 6, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All children entering sixth grade in Philadelphia schools next fall will be required to have immunity to chicken pox, the city Health Department announced yesterday. Sixth graders under 13 in the city's public, private or parochial schools must either have had chicken pox or one dose of the chicken-pox (varicella) vaccine. Those entering sixth grade who are 13 or older will need two doses of vaccine, spaced at least 28 days apart, if they have not had the disease. Twenty-three states have a similar requirement for sixth or seventh graders, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for Philadelphia's Health Department.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The American Academy of Pediatrics yesterday gave the new chicken pox vaccine its official sanction, recommending that the vaccine be given routinely to children between the ages of 12 and 18 months and to all older children who have not yet had the disease. The chicken pox vaccine is due in doctors' offices the first week of May, and pediatricians expect the demand for the shot to be enormous. Spring is traditionally a big time for chicken pox, a viral disease that each year infects about 3.9 million people in the United States alone, leaving them covered with itchy red spots.
NEWS
March 18, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chicken pox will soon be history in the United States. Yesterday, a vaccine for this last major childhood disease finally won the approval of the Food and Drug Administration after more than a decade of testing. Sold under the trade name Varivax, the vaccine should be available in six to eight weeks, according to the manufacturer, Merck & Co. Inc. of West Point, in Montgomery County. The FDA is recommending one shot for children aged one year to 12 who have not had chicken pox, and two shots for teens and adults who have not had the disease.
LIVING
August 10, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The chicken pox vaccine is still struggling to secure its spot in the arsenal against childhood diseases. Its reception by parents and pediatricians has varied from lukewarm to enthusiastic since it was launched in the U.S. market three years ago. In South Dakota, for instance, only 4 percent of toddlers were inoculated against the disease last year. By comparison, Philadelphia led the country with a success rate of 43 percent for the same age group of 18-month-olds to 35-month-olds.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ginny Schlussel of Warminster knows about the new chicken pox vaccine, but she is in no hurry to give it to her 2-year-old daughter, Maura. She figures she will discuss it with the doctor when Maura goes in for her checkup at age 3. She will probably do whatever he recommends. In the meantime, Schlussel will take her chances. After all, she had chicken pox and she survived. "I'm not too concerned," Schlussel said as she and Maura lunched at Montgomery Mall last week. "In fact, I think if somebody I knew got it, I might take her over there.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dozens of people with compromised immune systems could have been exposed to chicken pox at an AIDS fund-raiser in the city last weekend and should get an injection by today to prevent serious problems, public-health officials said yesterday. The Philadelphia Health Department learned midweek that a man who attended a "Gay Bingo Night" last Saturday was subsequently diagnosed with chicken pox. About 600 people were at the event at the Gershman Y in Center City, officials said.
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SPORTS
February 23, 2013 | By T.J. Furman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The World Baseball Classic has been far from a hit on American shores. Most fans cast their eyes a few weeks farther down the line to the start of the major-league season. Perhaps that could change this time around. After all, everyone loves some international intrigue. The Taiwanese baseball federation apologized to the South Korean federation earlier this week, according to South Korea's Yonhap News Agency. Why? Four Taiwanese scouts posed as umpires and snuck into a South Korean practice game on Tuesday.
SPORTS
January 13, 2013
From Frequent Flyers, the Daily News' Flyers blog: Flyers forward Tom Sestito enjoyed his time playing in England during the lockout. Except, you know, for the inedible food . . . and the fact that he came down with a case of the mumps. "They did the blood work and I ended up with a disease from the 1930s. I felt like I was on the Oregon Trail," Sestito said, laughing it off on Friday. "Turns out, a teammate's wife had it. I was already back in the U.S. for 6 days. I woke up one morning, my glands were all swollen, and I looked like 'Hitch.' [Will Smith in movie of the same name, not former coach Ken Hitchcock]
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five infants at the Cambridge School at Baldwin in Bryn Mawr have been diagnosed with chicken pox, the Montgomery County Health Department announced Tuesday afternoon. Harriet Morton, the department's spokeswoman, said the five cases were reported Monday. The report triggered a medical investigation that was ongoing Tuesday, Morton said. Because of the five cases, 11 other children at the school who were exposed to the sick infants, and had not vaccinated against the childhood illness, will be kept home from school, she said.
SPORTS
October 25, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who knows how these things spread? Maybe some of it is Twitter, some word of mouth, some the Internet, and some just plain old scouting and observation. However it happened, by the time ESPN the Magazine released its NBA preview edition, the majority of its experts - three out of four - had determined that 76ers rookie guard Evan Turner would be this season's "bust" pick. In a city waiting for a U-turn from its professional basketball team, and believing the No. 2 pick in the 2010 NBA draft would provide that much-needed redirection, the assessment of Turner as a bust is about as easy to swallow as a basketball.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of Endo Pharmaceutical Holdings Inc. rose slightly yesterday despite a 33 percent decline in third-quarter profit attributed primarily to inventory de-stocking by a drug wholesaler. Analysts expected third-quarter earnings of 33 cents a share, but had anticipated revenue of $222.2 million - about $5 million more than the $217.1 million revenue reported. Endo attributed the lower profit and its 11 percent decline in third-quarter revenue primarily due to a major wholesaler's reducing excess inventory, and not to any reduced demand for its prescription drugs.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a potential market of millions of aging Baby Boomers, Merck & Co. Inc. won federal approval yesterday to market the first shingles vaccine to people 60 and older. Shingles is the recurrence of the chicken-pox virus in adults, mostly elderly, and causes roughly one million new cases a year of blistering rashes and pain that can persist for weeks or years. The Food and Drug Administration approved the vaccine, which will be marketed under the brand name Zostavax. Zostavax, to be manufactured at Merck's complex in the Philadelphia suburbs, is an injected adult version of Merck's chicken-pox vaccine, and has been shown to prevent roughly half the outbreaks.
NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg and Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A booster dose of whooping-cough vaccine soon may be added to immunization shots for millions of American adolescents, at the urging yesterday of health experts. The 15-member advisory panel to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, rejected an additional chicken-pox booster for all young children and kept the total number of recommended shots at 25. The votes by the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice, during a two-day meeting in Atlanta, was a setback for vaccine-maker Merck & Co. Inc., but a boost for GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new experimental vaccine cuts in half the chances of older people getting shingles, a blistering skin rash that can lead to months or years of intense pain. A study of more than 38,000 people age 60 or older found that those who received the vaccine, made by Merck & Co., were 51 percent less likely to develop shingles. The vaccine also reduced the severity of sickness in people who got shingles, and cut by two-thirds the chances of developing long-lasting nerve pain. If the vaccine wins approval from the Food and Drug Administration, its reach could be huge, considering that shingles affects at least one million Americans a year, according to the study in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
January 4, 2005 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly a decade after a new chicken pox vaccine began driving down the number of children getting the itchy red spots, the federal government now has an even more ambitious goal: to eliminate the disease from this country. But to help get there, it might mean giving children a second shot of the vaccine. That would be good news for the vaccine's maker, Merck & Co. But some doctors wonder if it would be worth the cost and effort of adding another shot in a crowded vaccination program.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
At the Riverton Borough Council meeting Aug. 4, there was a discussion concerning the noise of the River Line horns at grade crossings. The discussion was prompted by a letter to former Mayor Bruce Gunn by U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews (D., N.J.). One of the more vocal members of the public suggested that we should sue NJ Transit for creating this noise problem. Gunn, now borough solicitor, suggested that we contact the chairman of the congressional committee that oversees the Federal Railroad Administration.
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