CollectionsChicken
IN THE NEWS

Chicken

ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011 | byline w, o email
HATFIELD GRILL We were there: 8:20 p.m., bottom of the 4th We waited: 5 minutes We ordered: Italian sausage on a roll, sweet-'n'-spicy chicken bites platter Cost: $15 Phindings: Hatfield Grills (the one we visited was on the third-base side of CBP) are where Phils Phans go for hot dogs, sausages and chicken bites. Where they go for good sausage and chicken snacks, His Phoodliness can't say - but it ain't here. True, we found the very mild sausage agreeable, at best, thanks to its subtle spicing.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware-based Townsends Inc. , one of the first and largest U.S. industrial chicken processors, has sold its remaining plants for $76.4 million in a bankruptcy sale. Townsends blamed its bankruptcy last year on feed-corn prices, which more than doubled because of higher China demand, "crazy weather" that led to poor crops, and the "diversion of our corn crop in the U.S. for ethanol production" under U.S. energy and farm policies, according to Michael Goodman , partner at SSG Capital Advisors L.L.C.
FOOD
May 31, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
The retired CIA agent from Maine didn't win. Neither did the 16-year-old girl from Hawaii, the lawyer from Manhattan, the remarried nurse from Idaho, the church organist from Indiana or the assistant chemistry professor from Pennsylvania. All were finalists in the 38th National Chicken Cooking Contest, adjudicated last week in Hershey, Pa. The winner of the $10,000 top prize was Melissa Mathie, a perky 34-year-old farm wife from Morrice, Mich., who subscribes to a cooking contest newsletter and enters 10 recipes a month in various competitions.
FOOD
March 29, 1989 | By Natalie Haughton, Los Angeles Daily News
With many consumers preoccupied with eating light these days, chicken and fish have become menu mainstays. But for many, plain grilled fish and chicken have become downright dull and boring. Take a cue from restaurateurs and perk up fish and chicken in a jiffy with simple fresh vinaigrettes, salsas, cold sauces or whatever you call them. A few of my reliable favorites are included below. All of them are delicious and would make a hostess proud to present to guests as well. A Tomato Basil Vinaigrette, chef Wolfgang Puck's creation, which is served with grilled fresh tuna and has been on Spago's restaurant menu since opening, has always garnered plenty of my votes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
LET'S JUST get something up front. I like to eat. I do not like to drive. So when eating involves driving first, the food had better be good. This is never more true than when eating involves driving to the Great Northeast and the route careens along Roosevelt Boulevard. Just because the Great Northeast considers itself almost sovereign and has its own airport doesn't give it license to turn the Boulevard into another runway. But, I'm here to critique the food, not the engineering involved in crossovers - which may be the worst idea since we started calling processed cheese a food item.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next time you're in a fashionable department store, browsing through the designer cosmetics, don't forget to thank those who made that anti-aging face cream possible: Chicken farmers. Run that past me again, you say? Then let us take you back a decade or so, to the South Jersey headquarters of the animal-health company IGI Inc., where executives had a problem bigger than Foghorn Leghorn. The solution they devised ultimately would lead to a product innovation that made moisturizers last longer and low-fat foods taste better.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was waterlogged chicken that the federal investigators were tracking in 1991 at the Camden poultry-packing business of a millionaire Cherry Hill chicken man. Their hunt turned up a tax dodger, as well. "It was people coming in with brown paper bags of cash" to buy the soggy chicken, and the millionaire failing to report the income, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Zoubek. So the U.S. Department of Agriculture brought in the IRS. Yesterday, they bagged Jack Lambersky, 53, of Gainesville Road, Cherry Hill, who pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court before Judge Joseph E. Irenas to adulterating 10,000 pounds of chicken and to failing to report $80,000 in 1988 income.
NEWS
December 12, 2004 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
You know you're dealing with an unusual business when its mascot is a stuffed pink Polish rooster having a bad hair day. John Snively of Mullica Hill has an unusual business. He sells chicken feathers over the Internet. Not your usual barnyard variety. Snively deals only in the plumage of specially bred avians. They are designer chickens, bred for their luxurious coats. Their feathers lure fish out of water. They are used to tie flies for fishing. Snively started Fly Tyer Variant four years ago, and the fly fishers, at least, are biting - particularly in the last year or so. Without revealing any numbers, Snively said, "business has been going up rapidly - extremely so. " His stuffed mascot is called King Variant (unusual chicken pelts are called variants)
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | By David Cho and Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Willingboro resident and two others pleaded guilty yesterday in a kickback scheme in which 3.4 million pounds of chicken poured into the McGuire Air Force Base commissary during a three-year period. At hearings yesterday in U.S. District Court in Newark, guilty pleas were accepted from Frank McNamee, 41, of Willingboro; John Cifaretto, 69, of Fair Haven, Monmouth County; and Gary Paterno, 61, of Palm Coast, Fla. Each faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison without parole and a $250,000 fine.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|