CollectionsChicken
IN THE NEWS

Chicken

FIND MORE STORIES »
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | byline w, o email
HATFIELD GRILL We were there: 8:20 p.m., bottom of the 4th We waited: 5 minutes We ordered: Italian sausage on a roll, sweet-'n'-spicy chicken bites platter Cost: $15 Phindings: Hatfield Grills (the one we visited was on the third-base side of CBP) are where Phils Phans go for hot dogs, sausages and chicken bites. Where they go for good sausage and chicken snacks, His Phoodliness can't say - but it ain't here. True, we found the very mild sausage agreeable, at best, thanks to its subtle spicing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2007 | staff
Q: Do you have some kind of crusted chicken recipes that picky kids will like? I have tried making Parmesan-crusted chicken, but the crust doesn't always stay on while cooking. I tried substituting fresh herbs for the dried ones called for in the recipe and wondered if that was the problem. I'm looking forward to your help; I enjoy your articles and read them whenever I can. - Lila F. A: Lila, I'm no Sherlock Holmes, but from the clues you left in your letter, it sounds like you're trying everything you can to get your children to eat chicken.
FOOD
May 31, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
The retired CIA agent from Maine didn't win. Neither did the 16-year-old girl from Hawaii, the lawyer from Manhattan, the remarried nurse from Idaho, the church organist from Indiana or the assistant chemistry professor from Pennsylvania. All were finalists in the 38th National Chicken Cooking Contest, adjudicated last week in Hershey, Pa. The winner of the $10,000 top prize was Melissa Mathie, a perky 34-year-old farm wife from Morrice, Mich., who subscribes to a cooking contest newsletter and enters 10 recipes a month in various competitions.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
My farm-to-table fantasy? I harvest eggs, milk and honey with my own hands and eat the fruits of my labor, aglow in the setting sun. Yet I'm a city slicker with a short attention span. So where's the happy medium for a potential urban farmer like me? Renting. Yes, just in time for spring, you can rent chickens for eggs (with an option to adopt if you come to love them) or goats for grazing your lawn (they don't bite). You can even rent your own honeybee colony to buzz about on your rooftop or in your backyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WHICH CAME first, the local, pasture-raised, free-roaming chicken, or the brown, heritage-breed organic egg? Most of us eat chicken and eggs regularly. The question is, what are we getting for our money? Where have those chicken and eggs been, and what are your options if you want to branch out from the mass-produced varieties that dominate most supermarket offerings? Whether you're a newly minted locavore, or a longtime proponent of the buy-fresh, buy-local movement, the notion of supporting smaller farms and producers is gaining popularity, driven by everything from creative chefs to the Food Network's nonstop foodie programming.
FOOD
March 29, 1989 | By Natalie Haughton, Los Angeles Daily News
With many consumers preoccupied with eating light these days, chicken and fish have become menu mainstays. But for many, plain grilled fish and chicken have become downright dull and boring. Take a cue from restaurateurs and perk up fish and chicken in a jiffy with simple fresh vinaigrettes, salsas, cold sauces or whatever you call them. A few of my reliable favorites are included below. All of them are delicious and would make a hostess proud to present to guests as well. A Tomato Basil Vinaigrette, chef Wolfgang Puck's creation, which is served with grilled fresh tuna and has been on Spago's restaurant menu since opening, has always garnered plenty of my votes.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
One man's ceiling is another man's floor. And one man's entrée is another man's pet. Today I'm talking about one of my chickens, who just died. And, yes, I had it cremated. Rather than barbecued. I can't decide if this makes absolute sense. Or is completely crazy. You be the judge. To give you some background, I keep a flock of about 15 hens, of different varieties. There are white Wyandottes, a shiny black Australorp, a few Rhode Island Reds and brown Ameraucanas, which lay greenish-blue eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
LET'S JUST get something up front. I like to eat. I do not like to drive. So when eating involves driving first, the food had better be good. This is never more true than when eating involves driving to the Great Northeast and the route careens along Roosevelt Boulevard. Just because the Great Northeast considers itself almost sovereign and has its own airport doesn't give it license to turn the Boulevard into another runway. But, I'm here to critique the food, not the engineering involved in crossovers - which may be the worst idea since we started calling processed cheese a food item.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Next time you're in a fashionable department store, browsing through the designer cosmetics, don't forget to thank those who made that anti-aging face cream possible: Chicken farmers. Run that past me again, you say? Then let us take you back a decade or so, to the South Jersey headquarters of the animal-health company IGI Inc., where executives had a problem bigger than Foghorn Leghorn. The solution they devised ultimately would lead to a product innovation that made moisturizers last longer and low-fat foods taste better.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was waterlogged chicken that the federal investigators were tracking in 1991 at the Camden poultry-packing business of a millionaire Cherry Hill chicken man. Their hunt turned up a tax dodger, as well. "It was people coming in with brown paper bags of cash" to buy the soggy chicken, and the millionaire failing to report the income, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Zoubek. So the U.S. Department of Agriculture brought in the IRS. Yesterday, they bagged Jack Lambersky, 53, of Gainesville Road, Cherry Hill, who pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court before Judge Joseph E. Irenas to adulterating 10,000 pounds of chicken and to failing to report $80,000 in 1988 income.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|