CollectionsChief Justice
IN THE NEWS

Chief Justice

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 12, 1986
Everybody says William Rehnquist is real smart. Everybody says he's easy to get along with. Ronald Reagan thinks he's neat. That's why he's considered certain to become chief justice of the United States. Those are remarkably stupid reasons to put anyone at the top of the federal courts for life. Consider a few of the reasons not to: His memory fails frequently, mostly at times when he's cornered. He can't remember a deed restriction on his home barring Jews, despite having had it called to his attention.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Edwin Guthman, Editor of The Inquirer
Reporters assigned to the White House were as surprised as most everyone else in the country when Chief Justice Warren E. Burger appeared with his successor, his successor's replacement and President Reagan on Tuesday and the President announced that Burger was retiring to devote full time to being chairman of the Commission on the Bicentennial of the Constitution. The reporters were highly skeptical of the reason given for Burger's leaving the court after 17 years as its chief.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With President Reagan praising them yesterday as apostles of "judicial restraint," William H. Rehnquist officially became the 16th chief justice of the United States and Antonin Scalia joined the court as its 103d member. The President, speaking in the East Room of the White House after Rehnquist and Scalia swore allegiance to the Constitution, said he had nominated the two jurists "with this principle (of judicial restraint) very much in mind. " Reagan did not explain precisely what he meant.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE'S AN an old saying that behind every great man is a great woman. Apart from its obvious sexist slant, there was considerable truth to the maxim in the case of former Pennsylvania Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. and his wife, German-born Renate Elizabeth Nix. "She was very supportive of him," said her daughter, Kimberly Bernhard. "She was the backup. " She traveled with her husband on his many trips on judicial business, took care of the entertainment, and generally helped ease the burdens of his presiding over the state's highest court.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The fellow justices of state Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert N. Wilentz have concluded that Wilentz committed no ethical transgression when he privately lobbied Gov. Kean over a bill to force him to live full time in New Jersey, but that he should have been more "formal and public" in making his views known. The justices unanimously dismissed a complaint filed by a state senator contending that Wilentz had violated the Code of Judicial Conduct by speaking with Kean, as well as by talking with a legislator and a newspaper executive over the residency legislation.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
When David Lee Yohn was on trial in Allentown in 1985 for the robbery and murder of an alleged local drug dealer, a critical piece of evidence against him was a tape recording of Yohn's own words after the crime. Common Pleas Court Judge James N. Diefenderfer ruled that the tape was of such poor quality that he would not allow it as evidence - a ruling strongly protested by the prosecutor. Less than an hour later, Diefenderfer received a telephone call that caused him to reverse himself and allow the jury to hear the tape.
NEWS
September 18, 2005
The U.S. Senate should confirm Judge John G. Roberts Jr. as chief justice of the United States. Roberts, a conservative who views the role of federal judges as very limited, wouldn't be most Democrats' first choice for the job. But President Bush won the election; he gets to make these nominations. And a week's worth of hearings by the Senate Judiciary Committee confirms that Bush has chosen well. Judicial temperament? However you define it, Roberts has it. He consistently displayed patience, a quick wit, a deep intellect, humility and a passion for the law. Not even the borderline badgering of Sen. Joseph Biden Jr. (D., Del.)
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille urged his colleagues Friday to take action against Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, reacting to newly disclosed sexually explicit e-mails McCaffery sent this year to the government account of his brother, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge. In an interview, Castille, who viewed the messages obtained by The Inquirer, said their graphic contents "undermine our moral authority" and the respect the citizenry has for the court system. "It's a cloud over all of the courts," Castille said after seeing the e-mails.
NEWS
September 5, 2005
The U.S. Supreme Court that William H. Rehnquist joined in 1972 behaved very differently from the court he led as chief justice until his death on Saturday. He was the chief reason for that. For 33 years, Mr. Rehnquist was an engine of change in the nation's legal landscape and its understanding of how its government should work. He did not complete the conservative revolution of federal jurisprudence for which so many on the right have campaigned. But he took it further than most Americans could have imagined in his early days on the court, when he was so often the lone dissent in 8-1 rulings.
NEWS
August 13, 1986 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Rehnquist's likely elevation to chief justice would not only fail to steer the Supreme Court to the right, but would also force Rehnquist to moderate his positions and restrain his dissenting opinions, according to a University of Pennsylvania professor who is completing a book on the role of chief justices. Jeffrey Morris, a nationally known authority on constitutional law, is completing the first full-scale scholarly book on the chief justiceship and its occupants.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 8, 2016
WASHINGTON - The GOP-led Congress sent legislation to President Obama yesterday repealing his signature health law, fulfilling a promise to Republican voters in a presidential election year but inviting a certain veto. The nearly party-line vote in the House was 240-181. The legislation already passed the Senate last year under special rules protecting it from Democratic obstruction, so it goes straight to the White House. Republicans boasted of a signal achievement, saying they were forcing Obama to face up to the failures of his law while illustrating the stark political choices voters face.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane can remain the state's highest law enforcement official even with a suspended law license, Pennsylvania's top jurist said Monday. Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor said the high court's decision to suspend Kane's license "is in no way constitutionally disabling. " He said Kane remains a member of the bar in Pennsylvania - a requirement, under the state constitution, for anyone to be attorney general. "An attorney who is the attorney general, and is suspended, is still a member of the bar of the Supreme Court, because the suspension is just temporary," Saylor said during a speech at the monthly press club luncheon in Harrisburg.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TONY FULWOOD had tears in his eyes when he walked into Frank Rizzo's hospital room and saw the mayor in the bed with a broken leg. Tony felt responsible for the injury, even though it was an accident and even though he was doing his job of protecting the mayor when an explosion rocked the Arco refinery in a nine-alarm fire in 1976, and he fell on Rizzo to protect him from the blast. "I hope you're not upset with me," Tony blubbered. "I wish I was in that bed instead of you. " "You know, Tony," Rizzo said.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was almost home free. On his 23d birthday in 1967, Marine Lt. Ron Castille was leading a platoon on a search-and-destroy mission in Duc Pho, South Vietnam, when he was hit in the leg by a Viet Cong machine-gun round and evacuated from the fight. For a moment, it seemed he was on his way to the safety of the rear. But just as the Marine helicopter bearing Castille was clearing the battle zone, a burst of enemy fire raked the thin metal skin of its fuselage, tearing another and much more serious wound in his leg. Military surgeons said they had no choice but to amputate.
NEWS
October 29, 2014
I HAVE READ with interest the coverage of your state Supreme Court, as I have long had concerns regarding the behavior of judicial officials, especially at such a high level. I will not comment on the pending conduct investigation of Justice McCaffery, as it would be more fair to allow for whatever minimum potential for due process that remains (probably none) to be reserved, and because I am acquainted with his wife and have met the Justice on a couple of occasions, although I have not seen or spoken to either of them in many years.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A skirmish between two rival Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices over pornographic e-mails erupted Friday into a full-court brawl, with a third justice stopping just short of lobbing blackmail accusations, and other colleagues fretting that the fighting had begun to erode the public's confidence in the bench. Responding to reports that he had received racist and pornographic content on a private e-mail account, Justice J. Michael Eakin said he never viewed those messages and accused another colleague caught up in the scandal, Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, of threatening to leak them to the media.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille urged his colleagues Friday to take action against Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, reacting to newly disclosed sexually explicit e-mails McCaffery sent this year to the government account of his brother, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge. In an interview, Castille, who viewed the messages obtained by The Inquirer, said their graphic contents "undermine our moral authority" and the respect the citizenry has for the court system. "It's a cloud over all of the courts," Castille said after seeing the e-mails.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The most famous legal analysis of hard-core pornography ever formulated was U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's: "I know it when I see it. " Inconveniently enough, when it comes to the pornographic e-mail traded by Pennsylvania officials and uncovered by Attorney General Kathleen Kane, seeing it seems to be the hard part. Kane apparently relies on much more complex legal theories than Stewart's to decide who may see the explicit material in question. As The Inquirer reported this week, she initially demurred when the state's chief justice, Ronald D. Castille, tried to determine whether any judges had participated in Harrisburg's pornopalooza.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Despite his calls for reshaping a Supreme Court he has decried as overly "activist," Gov. Christie on Wednesday renominated Chief Justice Stuart Rabner, a Democrat - the result of a compromise brokered with Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester). In announcing the renomination of Rabner - whose seat was seen by some to be in jeopardy amid a battle between the Republican governor and Democrats over the high court's composition - Christie also said he had nominated Superior Court Judge Lee Solomon, 59, a Haddonfield Republican, to the court.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Stuart Rabner rose from the ranks of federal prosecutor to New Jersey's chief justice with accolades from his former boss, Chris Christie. As U.S. attorney for New Jersey, Christie recommended Rabner to Democratic Gov. Jon S. Corzine, who recruited Rabner in 2005 as his chief counsel. Within 18 months, Corzine had nominated Rabner to the Supreme Court. Calling Rabner "a fabulous choice," Christie said: "There is not a job in the law that Stu Rabner could not do well.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|