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Chief Justice

NEWS
January 7, 1999 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Chief Justice William Hobbs Rehnquist has been a trial judge only once in his long career in the law. He has spent exactly 27 years in the solitary confines of the Supreme Court, a private man who keeps cameras out and walks its corridors and neighborhoods unrecognized by outsiders. But all that will be cast aside today when Rehnquist, 74, makes the quick trip from the Supreme Court to the Capitol to begin presiding at the first impeachment trial of an elected president in American history.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau (Inquirer staff writer Paul Horvitz contributed to this article.)
New Jersey Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert N. Wilentz has acknowledged telephoning Gov. Kean earlier this month in an effort to alter residency legislation that would require him to move back to New Jersey. The chief justice's concern focuses on a section of the proposed law that would require the governor, legislators, principal department heads and judges to make New Jersey "the center of his or her domestic life," Earl Josephson, a spokesman for the court, said yesterday.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | By Chris Conway, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Robert N. Wilentz, the chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court, announced his resignation yesterday, saying he had "disabling cancer. " A short time later, Gov. Whitman nominated Attorney General Deborah Poritz to become the state's first woman chief justice. Wilentz, 69, was a towering figure on the legal landscape, his opinions and those of his court resonating through the worlds of politics and policy in New Jersey and beyond, stirring both praise and controversy. With Wilentz's departure after 17 years at the court's helm, New Jersey loses an influential and innovative jurist who presided over what Laurence Tribe, a constitutional scholar at Harvard Law School, yesterday called "one of the most distinguished and pioneering state courts in the nation.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael J. Eagen, 80, former chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, died yesterday at his home in Scranton. A short, stocky man with a gift of gab and a fondness for good stories and rich food, he spent 40 years on the bench in a career that won praise from all quarters. He first ran for office in 1933, a time when Republicans were so far ahead in voter registration that they didn't bother to worry about the opposition. Things were so bad that the Democrats couldn't find anybody to put on the ballot for Lackawanna County district attorney.
NEWS
August 26, 2003
Former Pennsylvania Chief Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. wanted citizens to believe in the court system. He dedicated his life to making sure all were treated fairly there. Justice Nix, who died last weekend, spoke often about societal needs for "integrity, honor, respect, truth and industriousness. " He particularly expected those qualities in the legal profession. That's why he rooted out unscrupulous judges and guarded against overreaching police. Chief justice from 1984 to 1996, he presided over the state Supreme Court's stormiest tenure, a time Machiavelli would have felt at home.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The state Senate yesterday unanimously approved a residency bill aimed at Chief Justice Robert N. Wilentz, although several Republican members said it would have no effect on the New Jersey judge, who goes home almost every night to New York City. The legislation states that all state judges, all legislators, the governor and members of his cabinet must be "a domiciliary of and reside in" New Jersey, and debate centered on that language. "Your stated intention is to require the chief justice to live in the state of New Jersey.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert N.C. Nix Jr., the 62-year-old chief justice of the state Supreme Court, has been recovering for more than a week from surgery to remove a blood clot on his brain, officials said. Nix underwent the surgery at Temple University Hospital 10 days ago and wants to go back to work as presiding judge of the high court, his spokesman said. Neurosurgeons, however, want to keep an eye on him another few days. Nix was secretly admitted to the hospital May 21, after a CAT scan showed a subacute subdural hematoma - a pocket of clotted blood between his skull and brain.
NEWS
February 24, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Supreme Court Chief Justice Deborah T. Poritz said yesterday that she will hear arguments next Monday in the long-running Abbott v. Burke school finance case, even though she previously represented the state as attorney general. Poritz had recused herself from the case on two earlier occasions because of her role as attorney general. But the judge said she need not do so on Monday because she has no personal knowledge of the issues now before the high court. At issue is a report from Appellate Judge Michael Patrick King, who recommended last month that New Jersey spend an extra $312 million on full-day preschool, summer school and other programs in the state's 28 poorest school districts.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau (Inquirer Washington Bureau reporters Charles Green and Owen Ullmann contributed to this article.)
In a stunning shift at the Supreme Court, President Reagan announced yesterday that Warren E. Burger will retire next month after 17 years as chief justice and that he was nominating Justice William H. Rehnquist, the court's most consistent conservative, to replace Burger. Reagan also said he would nominate Antonin Scalia, a former University of Chicago law professor who has compiled a conservative record as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, to fill the vacancy on the high court.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
Retired Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, 87, the nation's 15th chief justice who served from 1969 to 1986, the longest tenure of this century, died yesterday. Justice Burger died of congestive heart failure at Sibley Memorial Hospital, said Toni House, spokeswoman for the court. "Justice Burger was a strong, powerful, visionary chief justice who opened the doors of opportunity," President Clinton said in a statement issued in Little Rock. "As chief justice, he was concerned with the administration of the court, serving with enthusiasm and always making sure it was above reproach.
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