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Chief Justice

NEWS
October 6, 1997 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Shortly before moving to the top of the highest court in the land, Associate Justice William Hobbs Rehnquist was known as "The Lone Ranger" because of his frequent solo dissents. He is a Lone Ranger no more. As the Supreme Court heads today into its 12th year under Chief Justice Rehnquist, it may justly be dubbed the Rehnquist Court. Often the conservative trio of Rehnquist and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas have been joined by centrist Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Anthony M. Kennedy to generate 5-4 victories that are reshaping the law in the areas of race, religion and states' rights.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By James H. Rubin, Associated Press
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who early in his Supreme Court tenure was kidded for being an ideological Lone Ranger, marks his 18th anniversary on the high court today - now the leader of a conservative majority. The survivor of a bruising 1986 Senate battle over his elevation to chief justice, Rehnquist has emerged as the collegial orchestrator of a major rightward shift in the court. "The Rehnquist court came of age" in 1989, said A.E. Dick Howard, a law professor at the University of Virginia.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | By Dave Barry
In case you've been too busy to follow the Trial of the Century in the U.S. Senate, here's the complete official transcript so far: SERGEANT AT ARMS: Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye! All persons shut up and pay attention for the trial of the impeachment of the president of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton, on charges of messing around! No chewing of gum! SEN. LOTT: At this time, in accordance with the United States Senate Big Book O' Rules, Sen. Thurmond shall swear in the Chief Justice of the United States.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | By Larry Williams and James Kuhnhenn, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.S. Senate may be the world's most exclusive club, but it never hurts to reinforce good manners among the members, particularly when the world is getting ready to watch the nation's second presidential impeachment trial ever. So yesterday a discreet reminder was distributed by the Leadership Working Group, a sort of Miss Manners committee of senators set up by Majority Leader Trent Lott (R., Miss.). For those concerned with the niceties of impeachment decorum, here are some of the rules the group came up with: Senators should plan to be in attendance at all times during the proceedings.
NEWS
August 6, 1986
What kind of attorney is William H. Rehnquist if he did not know the deeds on two pieces of real estate contained provisions forbidding the sale or lease to Jewish people or blacks? Is this the man we want to be the chief justice of the country? If a bigot is allowed to preside over our Supreme Court then our Supreme Court will no longer be supreme. Marcia Brody Cheltenham.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Funeral arrangements were announced yesterday for Richard J. Hughes, the former New Jersey governor and state Supreme Court chief justice. Calling hours will be Sunday from 3 to 9 p.m. at St. Mary's Cathedral, at North Warren and Bank Streets in Trenton. A Mass of Christian Burial will be Monday at 11 a.m. at Blessed Sacrament Church, Bellevue and North Hermitage Avenues, Trenton. Interment will follow at St. Mary's Cemetery on Cedar Lane in Trenton. Gov. Hughes died Monday at his Boca Raton, Fla., vacation home.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | By MICHELLE T. JOHNSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist will come to town next fall as part of the We the People 200 celebration. The announcement that the chief justice would come to Philadelphia on Oct. 2 came after organizers had been turned down by the U.S. Supreme Court, which decided not to visit Philadelphia en banc, and by former President Gerald R. Ford and former House Speaker Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill, both sought as celebration spokesmen. Meanwhile, Congress is considering whether to renege on a joint session that would bring all the representatives and senators to Independence Mall.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Arthur Chaskalson, 81, a civil rights lawyer who once helped defend Nelson Mandela and later became South Africa's chief justice, has died. South Africa's presidency confirmed Mr. Chaskalson's death Saturday. The state-owned South African Broadcasting Corp. said he had been battling leukemia. Mr. Chaskalson was one of several lawyers on the defense team that challenged the apartheid government's prosecution of members of the African National Congress for sabotage in the 1960s case known as the Rivonia Trial.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kate von Moschzisker Disston, 84, of Falmouth Foreside, Maine, formerly of Philadelphia, died at a Falmouth nursing home on Friday. Mrs. Disston was a daughter of Robert von Moschzisker, chief justice of Pennsylvania, and AnneMacbeth von Moschzisker. Her father was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1910 and served as chief justice from 1921 until the end of 1930, just six weeks short of 21 years. She grew up in Philadelphia and was educated at Springside School and in Paris.
NEWS
August 2, 1986 | By Arthur J. Goldberg
On the first Monday of October next, the Supreme Court of the United States will convene for its 1986-87 term. The rather unconstitutional vocal prayer of the marshal convening the court will remain the same "God save the United States and this Honorable Court. " There will, however, be changes in the personnel and seating on the bench. Justice William H. Rehnquist, a side judge, will move his seat to the center, befitting the office and function of chief justice of the United States.
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