CollectionsChief Justice
IN THE NEWS

Chief Justice

NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has nine justices, but if the constitutional fight over same-sex marriage reaches them this year, the decision will probably come down to just one: a California Republican and Reagan-era conservative who has written the court's two leading gay-rights opinions. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, 75, often holds the court's deciding vote on the major issues that divide its liberals and conservatives. More often than not, that vote has swung the court to the right.
NEWS
November 28, 2011
By Shira J. Goodman and Lynn A. Marks Having advocated a new Family Court building for years, we are very pleased that its construction is progressing at 15th and Arch Streets, and that the city's families will have a new, unified court in the foreseeable future. This is a major accomplishment for the public, the court system, and Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille. However, the process leading to this achievement has been fraught with problems, complications, and setbacks.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | By Mark Sherman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg invoked Aaron Copland. The chief justice countered with Jimi Hendrix. That generational divide at the high court was on display Wednesday as the justices heard arguments about whether Congress acted properly in extending U.S. copyright protection to millions of works by foreign artists and authors that had been in the public domain - meaning they could be performed and used in other ways without paying...
NEWS
June 19, 2011
Chief justice says coverage was unfair Having served in publicly elected office for decades, I am certainly accustomed to the rough-and-tumble media coverage of public service and the influence that big-city newspapers wield in their coverage. Ideally, the press investigates matters of public importance, thoroughly reviews the relevant facts, and, for the public's benefit, provides an objective and reasoned analysis of the issue at hand. However, your publication crossed the line in its inaccurate, unfair, and biased coverage of me during the past year, the most egregious example of which was your Boss Tweed-style cartoon depicting me as a corrupt judge with cash, watches, and other bribes concealed in my clothing.
NEWS
June 19, 2011
This paper has published several articles and commentaries about Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille's acceptance of gifts - travel and entertainment - from lawyers and law firms that do and could appear in his courtroom. We have also written extensively about the location and construction of a new Family Court building for Philadelphia. In a letter that appears on this page, Chief Justice Castille takes issue with our coverage and decries his depiction in one of our cartoons.
SPORTS
June 2, 2011 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Columnist
It is good to be Bernard Hopkins these days. He is carrying around four world championship belts. At 46 and having just won a unanimous decision over Jean Pascal, he is the oldest fighter ever to win a title, a distinction that George Foreman turned into a small fortune when he finally hung up his gloves and started grilling. Hopkins is fit, healthy, presumably rich, and still fighting. Check out his Twitter account. His bio says, and the caps and punctuation are his: "WORLD LightHeavyweight Champion!
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Chief Justice Ron Castille reported receiving thousands of dollars in gifts, rounds of golf, and travel expenses over the years from powerful law firms, civic leaders, and associations. This, I'm sorry to say, is perfectly legal in Pennsylvania, the land that ethics forgot. "We call that ordinary social hospitality," Castille said Friday. "You can't be nice? You can't be, like, social?" Since 2007, Saul Ewing L.L.P., a firm with 237 lawyers, has treated Castille to the annual Pennsylvania Society bash at Manhattan's Waldorf Astoria, with last year's trip worth $1,900.
NEWS
November 22, 2010
WE ARE getting raked over the coals by Chief Justice Ron Castille. Why? He decided to give 19,000 fugitives an early Christmas present. I'm glad Castille is so worried about the court backlog that he decided why put that pressure on the criminals? - let them go and commit new crimes. What a standup guy. As a retired Philadelphia police officer, I know that the law-abiding citizens of Pennsylvania don't want their chief justice to act like a high school principal. The criminals committed a crime and refused to show up in court.
NEWS
November 21, 2010 | By Mark Fazlollah and Joseph Tanfani, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last December, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille mingled with the state's other power players at the Waldorf Astoria during the meeting of the Pennsylvania Society. The annual New York pilgrimage of schmoozing and socializing is usually an expensive weekend - but not for Castille. The Philadelphia law firm Saul Ewing L.L.C., which regularly argues cases before the Supreme Court, picked up the $1,900 tab for the hotel room and dinners for Castille and his wife, just as it had done the previous two years.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
By Peter Vaira When a serious accident occurs during a circus performance - a trapeze artist falls, a lion trainer is mauled - the clowns are sent in to distract the audience. In the Stephen Sondheim musical A Little Night Music , the singer of "Send in the Clowns" has gone through so much romantic tragedy that she feels, "There ought to be clowns. " Philadelphia's Family Court situation deserves similar treatment. It is indeed a circus performance with a serious accident. Millions of dollars in public funds have been spent on a construction project that has yet to get under way; legal fees are running in the millions; and legal community leaders are squabbling with the state's chief justice over questions one might find on a first-year law school exam.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|