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NEWS
July 8, 2016
SOME PEOPLE seem to think that I actually matter. They message me in response to a particular column with either angry criticism or "atta girl!" euphoria, assuming that whatever I've written will have some impact on other readers. I am often amused by these emails, because the truth of the matter is that I can't even cajole my 7-year-old nephew to stop sticking french fries in the dog's nostrils. Clearly, my persuasive heft isn't all that hefty. And yet, after my most recent foray into politics where I mentioned that I'd probably vote for Donald Trump if no viable alternative presented itself, dozens of readers begged me to stop writing such ridiculous and/or dangerous and/or lunatic things.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, STAFF WRITER
Michael Fraser, chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, is resigning to become executive director of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials effective next month, both groups announced Tuesday. Fraser, a sociology PhD who has held various positions in public and policy inside and outside government, took over the 16,000-member physicians' group headquartered in Harrisburg in August 2013. "Mike led PAMED at a time of change, making tough decisions to strengthen and re-position our organization," said board chair David Talenti.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
By Paul McHale I left Congress almost 18 years ago. It was a rough departure. For six years, I had consistently supported the policies of President Bill Clinton. I still remember the bitter taunts thrown at Rep. Marjorie Margolies Mezvinsky on the floor of the House as she cast a courageous vote in support of Clinton's 1993 budget. Not a single Republican voted for that budget - and in the 1994 congressional election, every incumbent Democrat was accused of casting the "deciding vote.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
Jerry Buckley will retire as chief executive officer of the Pennsylvania SPCA effective Aug. 1 and will be replaced by an interim CEO, the animal-welfare organization announced on Thursday. Buckley, 60, assumed the role in May 2012 after serving as a senior executive at Campbell Soup Co. Previous to that, he worked as a journalist at Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. Julie Klim, a member of the PSPCA board of directors, will take over for Buckley on an interim basis. Klim has worked in biopharmaceuticals, private equity, and the non-profit sector.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Collingswood School Superintendent Scott Oswald said Thursday that Camden County prosecutors had demanded in a May meeting that the district report nearly every incident of student misbehavior to the police. "During that meeting, it was made abundantly clear by an assistant prosecutor that if we did not follow the directive, they would come after us with criminal charges, they'd come after our educational certifications," Oswald said. Since that meeting, students as young as 7 have been reported to the police for incidents such as shoving in the lunch line or allegedly making a racist comment.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
John Quigley, who resigned in May as Gov. Wolf's environmental protection secretary, will join the University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy as a senior fellow on July 1. Quigley, who was forced to resign after he sent a private email encouraging environmental activists to lobby for gas-drilling regulations, "brings a wealth of policy expertise to Penn's students and faculty," Mark Alan Hughes, the Kleinman Center's director, said...
NEWS
June 22, 2016
ISSUE | IRS CHIEF Censure not enough Why hasn't the U.S. attorney general indicted IRS Commissioner John Koskinen for failing to provide information demanded by Congress related to an investigation into targeting of groups seeking tax-exempt status, lying to investigators, dragging his feet in producing key evidence, and lying about destroyed emails? His actions surely warrant more than censure by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. |Dick Jones, Ocean City, N.J.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
William C. Kashatus is a historian, educator, and writer Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, affirmed the protections of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments by ruling that a suspect must be clearly informed prior to any questioning that he has the right to remain silent and that anything he says can be used against him in a court of law; that he has the right to the presence of an attorney; and...
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A woman who had a front-row seat at many of the events mentioned in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal racketeering conspiracy indictment testified for the defense at his trial Tuesday. But if Maisha Leek, the congressman's former chief of staff and campaign fund-raising director, knew anything exceptionally beneficial to his defense or to the prosecutors seeking to convict him, she managed to keep it to herself. One of the most closely connected, yet unindicted, members of Fattah's inner circle to testify so far, Leek worked closely with Herbert Vederman, the wealthy fund-raiser accused of bribing the congressman over several years.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen still wants to raise interest rates, but won't boost the price of money just yet. "I continue to think that the federal funds rate will probably need to rise gradually over time to ensure price stability and maximum sustainable employment in the longer run," which is the Fed's job, Yellen said in remarks Monday to the World Affairs Council in Philadelphia. She and her Federal Open Market Committee colleagues don't think weak hiring reports for May and April mean the economy is slowing.
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