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NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two lawsuits pitting a Camden police lieutenant and a former captain against Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson have been filed in federal court in Camden. The lawsuits - filed Tuesday and last week - involve John A. Sosinavage, who worked at the department from 1994 to 2013, and Lt. Anthony Carmichael, who started the same year and remains at the department. Both previously worked in the Internal Affairs Unit, and allege in their lawsuits that they were told to bend the rules in Internal Affairs investigations.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Despite his calls for reshaping a Supreme Court he has decried as overly "activist," Gov. Christie on Wednesday renominated Chief Justice Stuart Rabner, a Democrat - the result of a compromise brokered with Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester). In announcing the renomination of Rabner - whose seat was seen by some to be in jeopardy amid a battle between the Republican governor and Democrats over the high court's composition - Christie also said he had nominated Superior Court Judge Lee Solomon, 59, a Haddonfield Republican, to the court.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lieutenant who leads the narcotics unit of the Camden County Police Department has been suspended without pay after allegedly committing a lewd act while sitting inside a Starbucks in Cherry Hill. Benito Gonzalez Jr. of Sewell was charged by Cherry Hill police with a disorderly-persons lewdness offense in the May 7 incident. Police said Gonzalez pulled down his pants and exposed his genitals before touching himself at the Starbucks at 1192 E. Route 70. Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson said Gonzalez, a 17-year veteran who transferred from the former Camden City department to the county department, has been suspended without pay. Gonzalez's salary is $104,070, county officials said.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deer Meadows Retirement Community in Northeast Philadelphia, which filed for bankruptcy protection last month, is on track for a sale or reorganization that will allow it to keep operating, the nonprofit's chief executive, Lisa Sofia, said Monday. "The ultimate goal is for Deer Meadows to stay open, which it will," said Sofia, who assumed leadership of Deer Meadows in November 2011. That is when the continuing-care retirement community last made a bond payment. Deer Meadows, which has 491 residents and employs 369 workers, took on $28.38 million in bond debt in 1998 to build a new nursing home with space for 135 beds and then renovate the former nursing-home space into 78 personal-care units, bond offering documents said.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
With activists camped outside his headquarters and the nation's top technology companies bashing proposed Internet rules, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Thomas Wheeler is facing a backlash over his plan to create Internet fast lanes and slow lanes. Opponents of the proposal say Wheeler has sold out to the telecom lobby, and warn of Internet haves and have-nots. But supporters say Wheeler is constrained by a federal appeals court ruling and is adapting existing laws to a modern communications technology.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven months after a state official called his retirement package "excessive," the Upper Perkiomen School Board has rehired former superintendent Timothy F. Kirby, this time as interim chief. The school board voted 8-0 Thursday to bring back Kirby from July 1 to Dec. 31 at a salary of $335 a day. If a permanent replacement isn't found by Dec. 31, Kirby then will be paid $735 a day until June 30, 2015. Kirby's contract also calls for extending up to $55,000 in health benefits to his wife.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David M. Rosenblum, 47, of Collingswood, a civil rights lawyer who had been legal director since 2011 for the Mazzoni Center in Philadelphia, died of a heart attack Friday, May 2, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. The Mazzoni Center defines itself as the health-care and wellness center for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. William P. Fedullo, chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association, praised Mr. Rosenblum and his work. "David was a passionate advocate for the legal rights of the LGBT community and a beacon of our public interest community," Fedullo said in a statement.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bordentown Township Police Chief Frank Nucera was shot in a leg when his department-issued firearm discharged in the municipal building Tuesday afternoon. The shooting occurred around 3:45 in the tax collector's office. Nucera was shot once with the .45-caliber weapon and taken to Capital Health Regional Medical Center in Trenton for the wound, considered to be non-life-threatening. No one else was injured. A juvenile was responsible for the discharge, said Joel Bewley, a spokesman for the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After rising for a decade, violent and property crimes dropped on SEPTA subway and elevated lines last year, as fare-evasion arrests skyrocketed. SEPTA Police Chief Thomas J. Nestel III credited a change in police tactics: more officers in the subways, a crackdown on minor crimes, and a focus on fare jumpers. In 2013, there were 464 reported violent and property crimes on the Broad Street subway and the Market-Frankford elevated/subway line, down 14 percent from 541 in 2012. Violent and property crimes include murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, theft, and arson.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER PERKIOMEN A former superintendent of the Upper Perkiomen schools whose retirement package was criticized as "excessive" by a state official has been called back to duty by the Montgomery County district. The school board's president, William Scott, said the board had asked Timothy F. Kirby to be interim superintendent starting July 1, to take over for Beth Yonson, who resigned in December for unspecified medical reasons two years into her five-year contract. She officially retires June 30. Kirby worked for the 3,200-student district from June 2004 until he retired in February 2012 with $229,000 in unused sick and vacation days and health-care coverage.
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