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Child Advocacy

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NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's district attorneys hope to channel part of a $60 million NCAA fine levied against Pennsylvania State University for its handling of the Jerry Sandusky scandal to bolster and expand child-advocacy centers across the state. The centers provide child-abuse victims access to social workers, therapists, investigators, and prosecutors under one roof, and would offer the most effective use of the money because they directly address abuse treatment and prevention in the university's home state, said Shawn C. Wagner, president of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association.
SPORTS
December 14, 2011 | BY ANDY FRIEDLANDER, For the Daily News
DALLAS - The Penn State football team's imminent arrival for the TicketCity Bowl has caught the attention of the Dallas-area's child-advocacy community but is not likely to lead to any protests, leaders of several area organizations said. The 24th-ranked Nittany Lions, scheduled to travel to Dallas on Dec. 26 to prepare for their matchup with No. 20 Houston on Jan. 2 at the Cotton Bowl, have become a lightning rod for criticism and controversy since accusations of child sexual abuse by former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky surfaced in November.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second straight year, Pennsylvania State University will provide two regional child advocacy groups with money the school would have otherwise collected from football bowl revenue. University officials said the school would distribute close to $230,000 to the Stewards of Children education and prevention program and the Children's Advocacy Center, two Centre County organizations that are dedicated to protecting children. As part of the sanctions imposed by the NCAA and Big Ten Conference following child sex-abuse crimes committed by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, the Nittany Lions were prohibited last season from playing in postseason games.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | Staff Report
WHAT TO DO with the $60 million the NCAA fined Penn State in the Jerry Sandusky case? Many suggestions have been made, and the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association has now given a strong recommendation that the money go to expanding the successful, if limited, children's advocacy centers. In a letter to Penn State president Rodney Erickson and NCAA president Mark Emmert, the D.A.'s said that expanding access to CAC services, now available in only 21 of the state's 67 counties, would best meet the goal of the penalty.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD ABUSE Hotline needs funds to protect victims In a recent audit conducted by the Pennsylvania Auditor General's Office, it was found that nearly 42,000 calls to the state child-abuse hotline were dropped or left unanswered. While it's easy to blame the call center for this failure, insufficient funding and staffing and unacceptable working conditions are responsible. This lack of funding threatens the hotline's ability to retain staff members, threatening the progress made in the reporting of child abuse since the Jerry Sandusky case.
NEWS
August 18, 2013
Harrisburg wrecked this ship Not so many years ago, the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in all its wisdom, decided that the people of Philadelphia didn't know how to run the city schools. So the state took them over, dissolved the school board, appointed its own school board, and called it the School Reform Commission. The state was going to show us that the School District could be run better and more economically. I won't enumerate all the wonderful things the state has done since to land us where we are. Well, OK, just one: It hired Arlene Ackerman as superintendent and then had to pay her almost $1 million to leave.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Chris Kirchner
Once again, child sexual-abuse allegations have people everywhere shaking their heads in disbelief. Anger and frustration fill the airwaves, news columns, and blogs with questions like "How did this happen?" and "How did it go unreported for so long?" "Stranger danger" has often been overemphasized by those who would keep children safe from predators. While studies have shown that one in four girls and one in six boys are sexually abused by the age of 18, the sad truth is that 90 percent of victims know the offenders well.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
So, if you've gotta have a hook to win Miss America these days, who among the three local contestants has the best chance at snagging the crown? Our pick is Miss Pennsylvania, Susan S. Spafford, a 23-year-old Erie resident. Not only is she Korean - and Miss America has yet to have an Asian winner - but she's striking, intelligent and accomplished. She probably has a killer talent - she's working on a master's degree in music. And - perhaps most important - she has a compelling story to tell.
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State officials said Tuesday that the $2.26 million the university would have earned from 2012-13 bowl revenues collected by Big Ten Conference football teams has been divided into 12 equal shares for each member school to distribute to regional charities that focus on child advocacy and protecting children. In a news release, the university said it would donate its share, a total of $188,344, through the Centre County United Way with instructions to split the money between the Children's Advocacy Center and the Stewards of Children program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD ABUSE Hotline needs funds to protect victims In a recent audit conducted by the Pennsylvania Auditor General's Office, it was found that nearly 42,000 calls to the state child-abuse hotline were dropped or left unanswered. While it's easy to blame the call center for this failure, insufficient funding and staffing and unacceptable working conditions are responsible. This lack of funding threatens the hotline's ability to retain staff members, threatening the progress made in the reporting of child abuse since the Jerry Sandusky case.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
As she rocked her 4-month-old infant in her arms, a visually upset young mother said, "I think my baby is falling apart and so am I. " A quick glance at this previously healthy child confirmed her fears. "He was doing great for the first few months and was so happy, but ever since I weaned him from breast feeding to formula to go back to work, he has almost become unrecognizable," she said. "He is constantly crying, is having diarrhea, and has this horrible rash on his face. I think his hair is coming out as well.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
The pediatric resident I was overseeing in our busy sick clinic at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children hurriedly described the 2-year-old he had just seen with a rash on his trunk. "I think the child's been beaten," the resident said to me, wide-eyed and somewhat shaken. "He has several long, dark lines on his back and stomach. It looks like slap marks. " Child abuse and neglect is the dark side of pediatrics that is seen all too often. There are telltale signs, "red flags" that alert pediatricians to the possibility a child has been intentionally abused: bruising in a child who isn't yet crawling; marks on areas where there are no bony prominences, such as the ears, neck, and, like our patient, the trunk.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DECADES AGO - before houses sprang up between his block of 12th Street and Broad Street - Wes Hatton used the open space in his North Philadelphia neighborhood to teach his daughter and her friend Kim Jones how to ride bikes. Hatton, who has lived on 12th Street near Jefferson for 55 years, knew Jones all her life. He can't grasp the fact that someone killed her Tuesday morning, firing a single bullet into the back of her skull just steps from Hatton's and Jones' side-by-side rowhouses.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
FOR KIM JONES, life was about caring for others. The mother spent the last several years working at an organization that helps abused and neglected children. But with the pull of a trigger yesterday morning - a single bullet fired into the dedicated child-advocacy worker's head as she went off to work - that was all gone. Police said Jones, 56, left her North Philadelphia home about 9 a.m. and walked less than a block to a bus stop at 12th and Jefferson streets, just as she had each day for several years on her way to her job at Center City-based Turning Points for Children.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second straight year, Pennsylvania State University will provide two regional child advocacy groups with money the school would have otherwise collected from football bowl revenue. University officials said the school would distribute close to $230,000 to the Stewards of Children education and prevention program and the Children's Advocacy Center, two Centre County organizations that are dedicated to protecting children. As part of the sanctions imposed by the NCAA and Big Ten Conference following child sex-abuse crimes committed by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, the Nittany Lions were prohibited last season from playing in postseason games.
NEWS
August 18, 2013
Harrisburg wrecked this ship Not so many years ago, the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, in all its wisdom, decided that the people of Philadelphia didn't know how to run the city schools. So the state took them over, dissolved the school board, appointed its own school board, and called it the School Reform Commission. The state was going to show us that the School District could be run better and more economically. I won't enumerate all the wonderful things the state has done since to land us where we are. Well, OK, just one: It hired Arlene Ackerman as superintendent and then had to pay her almost $1 million to leave.
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State officials said Tuesday that the $2.26 million the university would have earned from 2012-13 bowl revenues collected by Big Ten Conference football teams has been divided into 12 equal shares for each member school to distribute to regional charities that focus on child advocacy and protecting children. In a news release, the university said it would donate its share, a total of $188,344, through the Centre County United Way with instructions to split the money between the Children's Advocacy Center and the Stewards of Children program.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toxicology tests have confirmed that the Camden mother who decapitated her toddler and killed herself in August had smoked marijuana laced with PCP. The results were forwarded to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office on Monday. They showed that Chevonne Thomas, 34, had smoked marijuana and phencyclidine, a hallucinogenic known to cause extreme violence in some users, said Jason Laughlin, spokesman for the prosecutor. On Aug. 22, Thomas, who suffered from mental illness and twice lost custody of her son because of drug use, stabbed and cut the head off 2-year-old Zahree, put the head in a freezer, and then fatally stabbed herself in her Parkside apartment, police said.
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