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Child Development

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NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four-year-old Eric Pupo was busy stacking dishes in a pretend kitchen sink when Sara Hutchinson sat down next to him. "Are you going to make something?" Hutchinson asked. "I just like playing in the kitchen with the dishes," Eric said. Eric went about his business under Hutchinson's careful oberservation. For the boy, it was just another day at play. For Hutchinson and about 80 other students, it was class work in child development and parenting at Strath Haven High School.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Maybe teaching a class full of 3- and 4-year-olds how to perform "The Itsy-Bitsy Spider" with their fingers isn't the usual way of learning pediatrics. But it is standard child-development training at Clearview Regional High School's Little Pioneers Nursery School Program. Aimee Radtke, 17, a senior at Clearview, has aspirations of becoming a pediatric nurse. She and her 71 child-development classmates team up every day to teach 46 preschoolers under the supervision of their regular high school teacher.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Experience a key ingredient of leadership As a retired teacher with 26 years of experience, I wonder whether the "Trend in younger principals" (Wednesday) would extend to leaders in business, law, or the media. Can a person in those fields with five or less years of experience attain a position of leadership and responsibility for hundreds of people? Being in charge of a school requires more than skill in technology and awareness of the latest best practices, which change constantly.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The talk was about bees. The three Hatboro-Horsham high school students wanted to make sure they knew all about them. How do they make honey? Where do they make honey? More important, how would the students wrap all of the facts into some fun for their audience of 3- and 4-year-olds? So the high school students sat around a table in the Hatters' preschool room at the high school, planning their strategy, coloring in drawings of bees with bright yellows and deep blacks. Teaching can be a tough job. And teaching preschoolers is a challenge.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
All nursery schools may feature the same heart-tugging combination of cute children, toys, crayon drawings and paper creations pasted on the fridge, but they are not created equal. Judging by the roomful of excited preschoolers at Pennsbury High School, this nursery program run by high school seniors as part of a yearlong course on child development is a smash success. "My daughter has been in other programs, and she likes (Pennsbury) better than anything she's ever done," said Wren Dayton, mother of 5-year-old Morgan.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three new Hatboro-Horsham School District programs promise a more individualized approach to the educational needs of students. At a meeting Monday night, the school board reviewed the administration's planned vo-tech education, child development and computer-assisted learning programs. Hatboro-Horsham High School's Diversified Occupational Training program gives students the chance to attend school part-time while working in a tailor-made vocational program. The four students who are participating this year work in jobs outside the school 40 hours a week in addition to their half-days at the high school.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Berry Brazelton has been tending to babies and their families for half a century, and from his perspective, the pressures on parents have never been greater. The famed pediatrician, child development expert and author of 30 books ticks off a list of stresses: parents raising children without the support of extended families and community; women in the workforce with not enough quality child-care options; television coming at kids for hours on end with content that's often heavy on violence and sexual content; schools that have shut parents out. And that's just for starters, Brazelton said in an interview.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
High school senior Kevin Byrne has cut one class period every day for the last seven months without a single detention. Byrne skips his study hall five days a week so he can teach in the preschool located at Central Bucks East High School. At age 18, Byrne has become a teaching machine, preparing for a career spent in colorfully decorated classrooms full of youngsters eager to learn, learn, learn. "Before this class, I never thought about cognitive skills, motor skills - it wasn't even a part of my vocabulary," Byrne said.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | By Michelle R. Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Lisa Garrity, a 17-year-old junior at Haverford High School who was killed in a car accident Wednesday night, enjoyed a child development course she was taking and was thinking about turning her love for children into her life's work. "She cared for children in need or children that were hurt," said her mother, Robin. "She had a big spot for that and felt that it was going to take her somewhere. " Lisa, of Havertown, was killed when the car she was riding in crashed into a pole on West Chester Pike near Naylors Run in Haverford Township at 11 p.m. The driver and a front-seat passenger, both 17, suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | By Frank Lewis, Special to The Inquirer
Johanna Cornelia Van Looy of Williamstown, a retired educator, died Saturday at the Leader Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Cherry Hill. Miss Van Looy had taught for 40 years in the Williamstown, Lakewood and Westfield School Districts and was a helping teacher in the Salem County School District. She also was a professor emeritus at Glassboro State College, specializing in child development. She received a bachelor's degree from Glassboro State College, a master's degree in music from Syracuse University and a doctorate in education from the University of Maryland.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 2, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Experience a key ingredient of leadership As a retired teacher with 26 years of experience, I wonder whether the "Trend in younger principals" (Wednesday) would extend to leaders in business, law, or the media. Can a person in those fields with five or less years of experience attain a position of leadership and responsibility for hundreds of people? Being in charge of a school requires more than skill in technology and awareness of the latest best practices, which change constantly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: Thus far, our two children, 2 and 7, have met or exceeded their development markers. The same has not been true for all of their cousins. In fact, our 2-year-old is much more verbally advanced than some of his older cousins. Can you please offer some guidance for handling situations with uncles and aunts at family gatherings (every month or so) when the differences are out there for all to see? Our relatives are nice and also very human, which means they notice such things, and sometimes (to my eyes)
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hours of trying to calm a fussy 3-month-old led Carolyn Kent Rovee-Collier to a lifetime study and new understanding of infant psychology. Dr. Rovee-Collier's creative solution - discovered in 1965 while she was working on her doctoral thesis - involved tying a ribbon to baby Benjamin's ankle so he could set his crib mobile in motion on his own. Benjamin's response proved that preverbal infants could learn and remember, according to Dr. Rovee-Collier's son...
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not only poor Philadelphia children who are going without high quality child-care and preschool programs - suburban communities have severe shortages of slots, and in many cases costs are prohibitive. Those findings are from a report released today by Public Citizens for Children and Youth, a Philadelphia-based advocacy group that has issued similar studies on education, health, poverty, and nutrition in recent months. Characteristics of high-quality care include having trained teachers who understand child development and can teach social and emotional skills along with letters and numbers, said Shawn Towey, the organization's child-care policy coordinator.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To their young charges, they're the slightly older arbiters of fun in the summer. The camp counselor is the hip role model who is cool to look up to. But the young people whose job it is to take care of campers during the summer say their jobs are about more than supervising the basketball game or taking the easy path to summer employment. Their role has increasing responsibility and requires training that has become more extensive and varied. "We see the kid whose parents are going through a divorce, or the kid coming in the same clothes day after day. Sometimes we see pain and suffering that they may be going through at home," said Josh Watters, 24, a counselor at the Diamond Ridge day camp in Jamison.
NEWS
April 10, 2011 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cases can be beyond cold, dating back decades. The wrongful conduct can be as blatant as rape, or as subtle as a whispered compliment. And the accused are among the most respected men in the region. To sort it all out, the former sex-crimes prosecutor heading the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's investigation of nearly 30 suspended priests has put together a team that includes experts on the psychology of sex offenders and a pair of ex-police officers from the Special Victims Unit.
NEWS
August 23, 2008
Andrew McMeekin Newtown Square I was pleased to see Lini Kadaba's article on Wednesday, "Building better babies?" As a child psychologist, I support programs that inform child development. Thank you for highlighting the fact that this program would benefit from more rigorous study. Dana Calafati is to be commended for her dedication to raising healthy children. However, she and other well-intentioned parents may miss the big picture. The growing brain has a wonderfully efficient and natural order for development, and while we, as caring parents, can certainly support it, spending large amounts of time and money on programs such as this may be a poor investment of family funds and could have negative consequences by altering the natural pace of brain development.
NEWS
May 30, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teenagers who have trouble juggling homework, jobs and chores now have a new excuse. University of Minnesota researchers found that the ability to multitask is still developing until age 16 or 17. Given a test that required remembering multiple pieces of information and using them to plan and act, the youths did worse than 18- to 20-year-olds. "They can multitask, but, if the amount of information to be dealt with increases, they will reach a challenge point before a young adult does," said Monica Luciana, an associate psychology professor whose work was published this month in the journal Child Development.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
T. Berry Brazelton has been tending to babies and their families for half a century, and from his perspective, the pressures on parents have never been greater. The famed pediatrician, child development expert and author of 30 books ticks off a list of stresses: parents raising children without the support of extended families and community; women in the workforce with not enough quality child-care options; television coming at kids for hours on end with content that's often heavy on violence and sexual content; schools that have shut parents out. And that's just for starters, Brazelton said in an interview.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children who spend long hours in child care are more likely to be aggressive and disobedient when they reach kindergarten age, according to the latest results from a major federal study. In a finding sure to provoke controversy, researchers will report today that regardless of where a child was cared for - at a day-care center, in someone's home, or with a relative - those who spent more time in non-maternal care were more likely to have behavior problems than children who spent less time in child care.
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