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Child Poverty

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NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Former Sen. Bill Bradley challenged the nation yesterday to eliminate child poverty within a decade, likening his proposals to John F. Kennedy's goal of landing a man on the moon. Speaking in the low-income neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant, the Democratic presidential candidate laid out what he called a "down payment" toward solving what is "perhaps the most intractable American problem of this century. " Bradley's proposal - which he said would cost taxpayers $9.8 billion in its first year and an undetermined amount after that - would provide a series of tax credits, child-care subsidies, minimum-wage increases and educational programs to cut the number of poor children from 13.5 million now to 6.5 million after eight years.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
By 10 a.m. Saturday, at least 75 people had lined the sidewalk outside St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Glassboro. Some held infants, some waited in wheelchairs, and some helped the elderly carry canvas bags or push small carts. They had all come for food. Asked what was left in his kitchen at home, Tim, 13, giggled. "Carrots," the Elk Township teen said. Not a favorite. "Good morning, everyone," Vivian Hanson, the archdeacon's wife, shouted as she opened the door of the Gloucester County church.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Kera Ritter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly half of Camden's children live in poverty, a rate that makes it the highest in New Jersey, surpassing Asbury Park and Newark, according to a study released yesterday. Camden Kids Count, a profile on child well-being, offers this statistic and others that portray a mostly bleak picture of the waterfront city. But the report also shows progress in reducing the number of low-birth-weight babies and increasing prenatal care. "The importance of [the study] is that we now have a baseline from which to judge and address program services data," said Mary Coogan, assistant director of the Association for Children of New Jersey.
NEWS
November 22, 2000 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The child-poverty rate declined in Philadelphia during most of the 1990s, but it climbed slightly in some suburban counties amid the economic expansion, according to a U.S. Census Bureau estimate being released today. From 1995 to 1997, the poverty rate rose in Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks Counties, and in New Jersey's Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties. During that period, the only suburban county to show improvement was Chester County, in which it fell slightly. The uptick - which took place after a decline in the first half of the decade - comes despite steadily falling poverty rates nationwide and in Pennsylvania, according to previous census reports.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday. Children's poverty also declined, while median household income barely changed between 2012 and 2013. The report further shows that 42 million people, 13.4 percent of Americans, were without health-insurance coverage in 2013. The data were compiled in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, which describes conditions in 2013.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
"The ultimate test of a moral society is the kind of world that it leaves to its children. " - Theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer It's spring, and once again I find myself sitting on my back porch gazing at the disparities on the two sides of our modest backyard. On the sunny side, a dozen varieties of flowers blossom in a colorful collage of reds, blues and whites, attracting honeybees and even hummingbirds. On the shady side, the ground is hard, the grass grows poorly, and the colors are bland.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If you were to set out, as Stephen Shames did in 1984, to photograph an American social malaise, you couldn't help but get it right, especially if you looked in cities. Traveling around the country for five years, Shames, a former Inquirer photographer, compiled a series of pictures of children who live in poverty. He found the condition so widespread, involving 20 percent of American children, that he has become a crusader against it. Shames' photographs have been turned into a book, Outside the Dream (Aperture, $29.95)
NEWS
September 30, 2003 | Robert Rector
Robert Rector is a senior research fellow at The Heritage Foundation Let the hyperventilating begin. Expect critics of the Bush administration to seize on the U.S. Census Bureau's annual report on poverty. Look, they'll say, poverty's up. They'll blame tax cuts. Or the war in Iraq. Or the gap between rich and poor. Heck, they may try to pin it on SUVs. They're right about one small thing: Child poverty did rise - very slightly - in 2002. But the increase is minimal compared to prior recessions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. poverty rate has decreased for the first time since 2006, according to U.S. Census figures released Tuesday. Children's poverty also declined, while median household income barely changed between 2012 and 2013. The report further shows that 42 million people, 13.4 percent of Americans, were without health-insurance coverage in 2013. The data were compiled in the 2014 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement, which describes conditions in 2013.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
"The ultimate test of a moral society is the kind of world that it leaves to its children. " - Theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer It's spring, and once again I find myself sitting on my back porch gazing at the disparities on the two sides of our modest backyard. On the sunny side, a dozen varieties of flowers blossom in a colorful collage of reds, blues and whites, attracting honeybees and even hummingbirds. On the shady side, the ground is hard, the grass grows poorly, and the colors are bland.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of children living in poverty in Delaware County increased by 30 percent between 2008 and 2012, according to a new report. Around 21,000 children 17 and under were living in poverty in the county in 2012, according to the report by Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY), a youth advocacy and research nonprofit in Philadelphia. That's a county child-poverty rate of 16.7 percent, PCCY reported. According to the agency's calculations, the Delaware County child-poverty rate is the highest among the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, PCCY officials said at a news conference in the food pantry at the Bernardine Center in Chester on Monday.
NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty in New Jersey has reached levels not seen in 50 years, as more than two million people from Sussex to Cape May Counties founder in a deepening struggle to keep themselves and their families fed, housed, and healthy. The troubling findings, part of a report spotlighting poverty in 2011, were released Sunday by Legal Services of New Jersey's Poverty Research Institute. The report is called "Poverty Benchmarks 2013. " While the recession ended in 2009, the report shows, the misery it wrought - most notably upon children - has continued.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Democratic voters will choose from a rich field in New Jersey's Aug. 13 U.S. Senate primary. But Newark Mayor Cory Booker rises above his substantial competitors. Booker has earned national recognition for his grasp of urban issues, having served as chief executive of the state's largest city with grit and passion since 2006. He could fill a void in the Senate by making a case for America's cities. Based on his record and vision, CORY BOOKER is the Democrat most qualified to become an effective senator for the nation's most urbanized state.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
New Jersey's poorest workers haven't had a raise in three years. But Gov. Christie and the Legislature still refuse to join 18 other states in raising its minimum wage. In New Jersey, the minimum wage sits at the federal level of $7.25 an hour. That's about $15,000 a year in a state that draws the poverty line at $44,700 for a family of four. Christie called Senate President Stephen Sweeney's proposal to amend the state constitution to include an automatic minimum- wage hike a "truly ridiculous idea.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
By 10 a.m. Saturday, at least 75 people had lined the sidewalk outside St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Glassboro. Some held infants, some waited in wheelchairs, and some helped the elderly carry canvas bags or push small carts. They had all come for food. Asked what was left in his kitchen at home, Tim, 13, giggled. "Carrots," the Elk Township teen said. Not a favorite. "Good morning, everyone," Vivian Hanson, the archdeacon's wife, shouted as she opened the door of the Gloucester County church.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
That New Jersey ranks highly as a good place to raise children isn't surprising. After all, its residents are among the wealthiest per capita in America.   But the makers of public policy in the state must address shortcomings in combating child poverty that the Annie E. Casey Foundation's annual Kid's Count report says have gotten worse since the recession. New Jersey ranked fourth overall in the report — below New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont. Pennsylvania was 14th.
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