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Child Support

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NEWS
November 14, 2013 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MONTGOMERY County authorities rounded up 18 alleged child-support deadbeats yesterday morning in a predawn raid. The Sheriff's Department and Domestic Relations Office teamed up to track down 37 people with outstanding warrants for unpaid support. Those arrested collectively owe $180,000 in unpaid support for 25 children, officials said. Authorities last summer offered an amnesty program after a similar sweep in June. But this time, they decided, "these defendants had already had a chance to resolve their issues," according to a statement from the sheriff's office.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Forrest L. Black, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware County is now going after the unemployment benefits of parents who fail to pay child support. Officials at the county's Domestic Relations Department said only $50,000 was collected from unemployment payments last year. But in 1990 they are projecting collection of $1 million for child support payments. "Parents who are unemployed are still obligated to pay their child support when receiving unemployment benefits," said Anthony Simmons, director of operations for Domestic Relations.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elena Romond said that when her husband, Michael, threw his belongings into a plastic bag and left two days after Christmas 1985, she thought he would send her money to support their two daughters. Or maybe he would come back to live in the large split-level home in Washington Township where they had spent most of their 18 years of marriage. More than a year later, he has done neither, she says. Today, Elena Romond works two jobs to support her children, ages 12 and 13. The couple are legally separated, and she has been to court several times to force her husband to pay child support, without much success until recently.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Lisa Pierce of Chester entered the Delaware County Domestic Relations office and, after a little hesitation, stepped up to the receptionist's desk. Within a few minutes, she was ushered into an office to begin the process of filing for financial support for two of her three children. Office worker Debbie Hume began asking questions and plugging information into the computer. After a short wait, Pierce was given a date for a hearing with the children's father to establish a support order that would transfer the payments from the children's grandmother, with whom they had been staying, to her. "I thought I was going to be here for a long time," Pierce said.
NEWS
July 28, 1986 | By Neal Peirce
If there's been a dark island in the policies of the 50 states, it's child support. With rare exceptions, state bureaucrats and judges have failed dismally to force deadbeat fathers to support their offspring. Even the brave New Federalist era of state innovation has done little to stop the dreary litany. Mothers ask courts for relief and get put off time and again. Even if fathers get dragged into court, they persuade judges (usually male) that they're so hard off that they should be relieved of their legal obligations - even when their children are growing up in deprivation.
NEWS
July 21, 1997
Pennsylvania is among the most efficient states at collecting child support - which isn't saying much. The commonwealth collects $8.20 for every dollar it spends on administration, which makes it twice as effective as the national average. But that translates to a collection rate of only 31 percent. Only 31 percent of Pennsylvania children whose noncustodial parents (mostly fathers) have been ordered to pay support are actually getting the money. The chaos nationwide makes it easy for deadbeat parents to evade their responsibilities by simply changing addresses.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | BY RICHARD SALDAN
For many single mothers, the court system seems designed to be just one more heavy burden to bear up under and just one more draining roadblock to hurdle. For women fighting for custody of their children, it is worse than one can imagine. Many newly divorced women find themselves financially impaired, vocationally unskilled and emotionally exhausted. To make matters worse, the former spouse frequently has a higher income and greater resources to mount a fierce court battle. The few law clinics available are nearly always too backlogged and too busy handling other matters.
NEWS
October 4, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bobby Brown's bad-boy act has landed Whitney Houston's soon-to-be-former dependent in real trouble. Judge Paula Carey of Norfolk District Court in Canton, Mass., has issued an arrest warrant for the has-been vocalist (how long ago was Don't Be Cruel?), a court official yesterday said. Brown, a Boston native, skipped a hearing Monday on overdue child-support payments for his two children with Kim Ward, who says Brown is two months overdue and owes $11,000. Last month, Houston filed for divorce from the former New Edition singer.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER EAGLE Freddie Mitchell was arraigned on tax-fraud charges after surrendering to authorities in Orlando last week. Now he's sitting in jail in Orange County, Fla., after being arrested on an Indiana warrant for failing to pay back child support, a lawyer says. Mitchell, 33, known as FredEx, surrendered to authorities March 12 and was released on his own recognizance until his arraignment, which was scheduled for Thursday. Bringing his child-support payments up to date was a condition of his release prior to his arraignment, according to court documents.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015
I'VE PARENTED both as a noncustodial father and as a married father, and the experiences are vastly different - both for the parent and for the child. As a noncustodial father, a man can be reduced to little more than a voice on a phone, a playmate on a weekend or a name on a check. He can be, in essence, placed firmly in the margins of his child's life, even if he desperately wants to be in the center. I have lived that unending struggle, and I have learned the lessons that it taught.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pastor Willie Singletary, a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge, rolled up to the federal courthouse Thursday with a tour bus filled with churchgoing supporters, wearing a dapper dark suit and with his vocal cords primed to deliver the sermon of his life. In a reach-to-the-rafters performance before U.S. District Judge Lawrence F. Stengel, the 33-year-old recounted his rise to the bench and pleaded for mercy in a preacher-like cadence while invoking everything from his thwarted childhood desires to play Nintendo to recent racial strife between the black community and police.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
I'VE PERIODICALLY invited readers to write to me about family feuds that involve their personal finances. You certainly don't want to fight with anyone over money, especially with your family. Yet, when you mix money and family, the fights can cause deep divides and years of resentment. Such is the case of one mother who wrote about her relationship with her adult son over child support that his father was not paying. The background: When those payments became $40,000 in arrears, the reader said she decided to take the father to court.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BILL McMONAGLE went to work every morning wearing a bulletproof vest. He needed it because part of his job was to go after deadbeat dads, who frequently weren't happy about having to fork over support payments to women they no longer loved. Bill was shot at, hit over the head with a banister post, and, of course, regularly threatened and raked by verbal abuse. It was part of the job. Bill McMonagle was head of the Philadelphia Family Court bench-warrant unit. He not only tracked down deadbeat dads, but he also found children who had been kidnapped by irate parents, usually fathers.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
MONTGOMERY County authorities rounded up 18 alleged child-support deadbeats yesterday morning in a predawn raid. The Sheriff's Department and Domestic Relations Office teamed up to track down 37 people with outstanding warrants for unpaid support. Those arrested collectively owe $180,000 in unpaid support for 25 children, officials said. Authorities last summer offered an amnesty program after a similar sweep in June. But this time, they decided, "these defendants had already had a chance to resolve their issues," according to a statement from the sheriff's office.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 10 deadbeat Montgomery County parents had a rude awakening this morning when sheriff's deputies came knocking on their doors to serve warrants for failure to pay child support. Sheriff Eileen Behr said 20 deputies began looking around 1 a.m. for parents who have not paid court ordered child support. About 10 arrests were made in the Phoenixville, Pottstown, Norristown and Jenkintown areas. They are still looking for another 29 individuals, she said. "They had their chance to come in last week to strike deal," Behr said About $5 million in back support is owed to families in Montgomery County, Behr said.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I was married for five years before I finally got a divorce in January 2012. The divorce agreement provided that he was to support our two boys until they reached 18. It also provided that I was to have full custody, but that he would be able to claim the boys as dependents. He is now almost a year behind in his child support and alimony. Fortunately, my parents are able to help us. My income is only $37,000 a year. Last week, I got a notice from his CPA requesting that I sign a Form 8332 granting him the right to claim the children as dependents on his 2012 tax return.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My father was a nightmare. When I was a kid, he would tell me I was "a b- just like your mother" and throw things at me; he threw me down the stairs once and broke my arm. By the time I was 13, I realized I hated him and wanted him gone. Eventually I convinced my mother to leave him. I was 15 then and it's been about 10 years since I've seen or spoken to him. Over the years, my father has sent me cards on my birthday and other holidays, telling me how much he loves and misses me but never acknowledging what he did. He always sends sizable checks, usually several hundred dollars.
NEWS
February 23, 2013
Luge team's sleds lost in Pa. Some of the U.S. luge team's sleds went slip-sliding away down a Pennsylvania road. Now USA Luge is trying to get them back, and needs the public's help. Team marketing director Gordy Sheer said Thursday that he was returning to his hotel after working at an eastern Pennsylvania ski resort last week when five sleds fell out the back of the truck. They were gone by the time he realized what had happened. State police said a man in a black truck was seen picking up the sleds and driving off with them.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge is to decide Friday whether international kidnapper David Matusiewicz should be sent back to prison - but she could make that decision without even mentioning the shootout that left his ex-wife, her friend, and his father dead. Thomas Matusiewicz opened fire Monday in the New Castle County Courthouse in Wilmington, killing Christine Belford and her friend Laura Mulford and injuring two Capitol Police officers before taking his own life, according to Delaware State Police.
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