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Child Welfare

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NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing a "potentially explosive" situation, New Jersey's child advocate rang a warning bell about overcrowded juvenile detention centers yesterday, calling the Camden County facility the state's most problematic. Seventy-seven children were housed in the Lakeland facility in Blackwood yesterday. The center is licensed for 37. The crisis is due in large part to a systemic failure, Child Advocate Kevin Ryan and State Assemblywoman Mary Previte (D., Camden) said. A number of those children crowding into centers, sleeping on cots and mattresses laid on floors, are simply being warehoused because the state does not have anywhere else to put them.
NEWS
July 22, 1986
The United Methodist Home for Children, a 107-year-old non-sectarian facility, is closing its residential treatment program this summer. As a result, more than 50 children now in long-term placement will need alternative care, most of them for many years. The board of Methodist Home has independently and painfully decided to discontinue its on-site treatment program as a result of complicated negotiations with the Department of Human Services, which could not be resolved otherwise.
NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Richard Wexler
Even as he represented a 20-year-old mother whose sole crime appears to have been poverty, attorney Gerald McOscar was secretly rooting against his client, supporting a judge's decision to tear her 3-year-old from her forever. Then he rushed to trash his client in the newspaper ("Saving foster children from good intent," June 28). McOscar's position, which supports the destruction of his own client's family, is rooted in misunderstandings of the recent history of child welfare and how that system really works.
NEWS
June 20, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A series of proposals designed to improve accountability in New Jersey's challenged child-protection system advanced in the Assembly yesterday. However, the broadest of the bills - one that would reconfigure the troubled Division of Youth and Family Services - was put on hold. Critics noted that the bill itself needed an overhaul to ensure that the desired changes emerged, and sponsors agreed, pulling it off the table. Still, child advocates were pleased that measures previously stalled for years appeared to now be speeding along in the stretch run of the session.
SPORTS
June 22, 2010 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
USA Swimming announced a partnership yesterday with a national children's group to help protect athletes from sexual abuse, a move that did little to placate the most vocal critics of the embattled governing body. The Washington-based Child Welfare League of America, which describes itself as the nation's oldest and largest membership-based organization dealing with child-welfare issues, will help USA Swimming develop new safeguards and conduct an annual audit to ensure enough is being done to prevent coaches from having improper contact with their athletes.
NEWS
November 8, 2006 | Frank P. Cervone and Shelly Yanoff
Frank P. Cervone is executive director of the Support Center for Child Advocates in Philadelphia (www.advokid.org) Shelly Yanoff is executive director of Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth (www.pccy.org) The headlines shock, leaving a sense of communal failure. Children, born with little support, were betrayed - by their families and substitute families, by officials charged with guarding their safety, by laws and budgets. By all of us. As investigations into recent child deaths begin, we must recognize the multiple challenges the city Department of Human Services faces in supporting Philadelphia's neediest, most troubled families.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey has pledged that he will dramatically improve the state's child- welfare system next year by paying for every abused, neglected and delinquent child who needs care. But child-welfare advocates say the governor hasn't put money where his mouth is. State figures made available this week show that Casey has proposed raising state spending for the children by less than half the amount that his own welfare officials said would be needed under the current system. The $42 million spending increase proposed by the governor represents barely one-fourth of what county officials contend they need to care for mistreated children.
NEWS
March 16, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Faced with the monumental $320 million overhaul of the state's child-welfare system, acting Human Services Commissioner James Davy asked taxpayers for a few extra dollars yesterday. Davy is trying to drum up support for a shrinking pot of money called the Children's Trust Fund, given to local groups for the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The fund is partially financed through contributions made on New Jersey income-tax returns. Child-abuse prevention is a key component of the state's child-welfare plan, which must be approved or rejected this week by an independent panel reviewing the proposal for a U.S. District Court judge.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
An agreement yesterday on state funding for Philadelphia's children and youth services takes political heat off Gov. Casey and brings financial relief to Mayor Goode at a good time for both politicians. With Democrat Casey facing re-election, he doesn't need to be sued over money for kids in the state's largest Democratic city. With Goode facing a budget crisis that looks gloomier each day, any news of more state help is welcome. So yesterday, both city and state officials were smiling when they jointly announced settlement of a $120 million lawsuit against the state that Philadelphia and other counties filed last month.
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NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
LARBRIAH MORGAN'S voice trembled slightly as she shared her story. She was 3 years old when she and her siblings were separated and placed in foster care. By 9, she had lived with two foster mothers. One was as much a stranger to her on the day she moved out as she was six years earlier, when she moved in. She went to live with her grandparents, a home already bursting at the seams with relatives. By 17, she was back in the system. She now lives in a small apartment paid for by the child-welfare system while she juggles various jobs and a full college schedule.
NEWS
August 10, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Officer Teresa Sanchious wiped away tears Thursday, struggling with emotion as she told a jury she wished she had done more to save 3-year-old Jaquinn Brewton. Taking the stand on the third day of the trial of Jaquinn's godmother, Nadera Batson - charged with beating Jaquinn to death in a filthy West Philadelphia apartment in 2011 - Sanchious said she and her partner saw Batson pushing Jaquinn in his stroller through a Rite Aid parking lot just days before the boy's fatal beating.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Meg Kinnard, Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The U.S. Supreme Court this week will hear an emotional challenge to federal law on the adoption of Native American children, with several states, tribes, and children's welfare groups lining up to support current rules. The case involves a South Carolina couple fighting for custody of their adopted daughter who, after a court battle, was returned to her biological father in Oklahoma. At issue is the Indian Child Welfare Act, passed in 1978 because of the high number of Indian children being removed from their homes by public and private agencies.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Child protection workers did not prove that a Cape May County mother abused her infant even though the child tested positive for cocaine at birth, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in a unanimous decision Wednesday. The decision overturned two lower-court decisions in the 2007 case. Drug tests alone do not substantiate abuse and protection workers must show actual or imminent harm, the justices wrote. The court also found that state child welfare laws do not apply to a fetus.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
More arms is the answer National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre's statement that, "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," unpalatable as it might be, is nothing but the truth. If the tragically gallant staff at Sandy Hook Elementary School had been armed and skilled in the use of a firearm, instead of only being able to offer themselves as human shields, or charge, unarmed, at the gunman, many of the first-graders and staff might have been saved.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six years ago, after it became tragically clear that children were dying under the city's care, Philadelphia officials promised to fix things - to do better at saving innocents. "Who is in charge who gives little children to people who are so obviously, absolutely, completely incapable of taking care of them?" one Common Pleas Court judge asked of Philadelphia's Department of Human Services. A 2006 Inquirer investigation found that at least 20 children in two years had died of abuse or neglect after coming to the agency's attention.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If any good is to come from the NCAA's harsh sanctions against Penn State, child-welfare experts said Monday, it lies in the $60 million fine mandated for programs to prevent child sexual abuse and assist victims. District attorneys, former prosecutors, child advocates, pediatricians, and a lawyer for one of Jerry Sandusky's victims suggested a wide range of uses for the money, including: Expanding Pennsylvania's network of multidisciplinary child advocacy centers, from about 21 statewide to several dozen.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten states have rushed to toughen their reporting laws on child sex abuse in the eight months since Jerry Sandusky's arrest set off a nationwide scandal. One is conspicuously absent from that list: Pennsylvania. And many of the state's victim advocacy groups have worked to keep it that way - at least for now. Amid pressure to pass headline-grabbing legislation in response to the case against the former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach and the equally landmark trial of two priests from the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, child-welfare advocates have urged lawmakers to show restraint.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
For 25 years and more, the Philadelphia area has had a relentless advocate in Shelley Yanoff for improving the lives of children.   As the longtime executive director of the nonprofit agency Public Citizens for Children and Youth, Yanoff's contribution, as she prepares to step down from her post in the fall, can be charted readily in the critical initiatives she and her agency tackled. Whether lobbying state lawmakers for the creation of the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
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