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Childbirth

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NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
The first time, after hours of relentless, back-breaking pain, I went for the drugs. The second time, it all happened with such ferocious swiftness, I had to go natural. But by the third time, there was a choice. And since I expected this would probably be the last time I would bring forth a new life, I chose to call upon my body - and it alone - to do the job it was designed to do. Childbirth, whenever medically possible, ought to be about choice. Too often in our lifetimes, it has become a political statement, reflecting either the autocratic wishes of the medical establishment, or the tyranny of those who'd have us believe that resorting to painkillers is a dangerous, anti-feminist act. Which is why the study released earlier this month from the University of Colorado School of Medicine is a welcome injection of common sense.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman, Special to The Inquirer
Like many women expecting a first baby, Karen Tupitza had been doing her homework. The 34-year-old accountant from West Chester had been reading about the different stages of pregnancy, preparing herself for each physical and psychological development. When she reached her eighth month, Tupitza recalled recently, she began reading about childbirth methods, including the use of anesthetics to relieve the pain of contractions. There was also, she said, a brief mention of hypnosis for relaxation and pain control.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | by Maura Casey
I discovered the wonderful world of managed health care two years ago. This occurred in my sixth month of pregnancy as I complied with a requirement to call the insurance company in advance of my delivery so I could get permission to have the baby in a hospital instead of a snowdrift. While negotiating when and where I might deliver with a health-care manager, it dawned on me that the woman I was speaking to wasn't from anywhere in New England. "Where are you speaking from?"
NEWS
October 17, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Schnabel Reed, 62, of Haddonfield, a nurse and childbirth expert who taught thousands of parents how to care for their babies, died Sunday of breast cancer at Hahnemann University Hospital. For 25 years, Mrs. Reed conducted "Baby and Me" sessions and taught always-booked classes for expectant parents at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees. The mother of eight, she conducted Lamaze childbirth classes from home when her children were young. Though she never took drugs during their births, she advised other women to get epidurals for pain, her daughter Amanda said.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
NEW YORK - A close-knit ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn was plunged into a new round of mourning Monday by the death of a baby who was delivered by Caesarean section after his parents were killed in a grisly hit-and-run crash a day earlier. Police hunted for the suspected driver, identified as Julio Acevedo, saying he was barreling down a residential street in a BMW at twice the speed limit early Sunday when he collided with a car hired to take the couple to the hospital after the mother, seven months pregnant, felt ill. "The mood in the neighborhood is very heavy," said Oscar Sabel, a retired printer who lives near the scene of the accident.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | By Sue Chastain, Inquirer Staff Writer
Renee Jones had a fairly easy time with the birth of her son, Norman, who arrived just before midnight on May 6. Her 13-hour labor was relatively pain- free. When it was all over, she felt on top of the world. Her euphoria faded rapidly after the tubal ligation she underwent the next morning. "I was in so much pain from it, so sore, I could hardly breathe," recalled the 24-year-old West Philadelphia woman. "I couldn't even move. " It was then that doctors at Hahnemann University Hospital, where both procedures took place, told an incredulous Jones that she was being discharged the next day - her insurance paid for two days and no more.
NEWS
December 17, 1986
The Dec. 10 article "Soviets seek to safeguard childbirth," which described a proposed Soviet law for forced abortion in the case of alcoholics and drug addicts as a means to "make parents more accountable for the lives and health of their children," raises serious questions. In what sense could abortions "safeguard childbirth"? The headline should have read, "Soviets seek to jeopardize (or imperil, control, negate) childbirth," or that they "claim" to safeguard it in such an atrocious manner.
NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Beth Leianne Curtis
Last month, mothers, babies and birth advocates of all ages gathered at Chestnut Hill Hospital to rally in support of the hospital's labor and delivery department, which the hospital is considering closing. Chestnut Hill could become one of more than a dozen hospitals to close their doors to pregnant women in the Philadelphia area in the last decade. For many women, including myself, an apprentice midwife, this is a devastating trend. Chestnut Hill has had one of the lower cesarean-section surgery rates in the city, and it is the only hospital left in the city with private-practice midwives on staff.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
WHY IS A WOMAN who already has six kids so thrilled with childbirth that she would experiment with in-vitro insemination? With no father to support them, I guess the state has to bear the brunt of the expenses. Is this fair to the taxpayers of the state of California? I believe that you don't have the "right" to bring children into the world unless you are prepared to support and care for them. Maybe she should see a psychiatrist. Joe Hamilton Philadelphia
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Officer John Buleza says Gladys Alicea picked the "ideal" time to have her baby. Buleza, 38, had finished a course in childbirth at the Police Academy less than 48 hours before Alicea, 19, began to give birth yesterday. The timing was convenient for Buleza, who ended up delivering the North Philadelphia woman's child shortly after 8 a.m. To make the situation even sweeter, yesterday was Valentine's Day and Buleza's 16th wedding anniversary. After everything calmed down, Buleza called his wife, Linda, and told her what happened.
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NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time the officers entered the subway car, they could see the baby's head crowning through his mother's sweatpants. A group of riders had already formed a semicircle around her, offering as much protection and comfort as they could on the Market-Frankford Line. SEPTA Police Sgt. Daniel Caban and Officer Darrell James arrived at the 15th Street station about the same time: 5:50 p.m. on Christmas. "Get your gloves ready," Caban told James. Caban, who had experienced childbirth only as an observant father, knelt and removed the woman's sweatpants as she practiced breathing exercises.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
"My son will be 4 weeks old on Saturday," the young woman thought glumly as she sat burning with fever and with the same dull ache in her lower belly she'd had for weeks. She'd always been healthy and optimistic. The pregnancy had been a breeze. Now, in a hospital hours from her newborn at home, she was feeling discouraged. Her first pregnancy four years earlier had been complicated by prolonged labor, and she'd had a cesarean section. With her narrow pelvis, her doctors recommended another C-section for her new son. The surgery had gone well, and she'd gone home with the healthy baby a few days later.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013
WHEN I heard that Kobe Bryant's mom had received a $450,000 advance for a planned auction of his high-school basketball memorabilia, I was shocked, saddened and appalled. The way I figure it, she could've gotten at least $1 million up front. OK, maybe it wasn't the pricing that shocked me. Nor was it the fact that Kobe sued his mother to keep her from selling some old basketball junk she had in her basement. The thing that really got me was that all of this happened around Mother's Day. I don't know about Kobe's world, but in the Jones household, Mother's Day is sacred.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
NEW YORK - A close-knit ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn was plunged into a new round of mourning Monday by the death of a baby who was delivered by Caesarean section after his parents were killed in a grisly hit-and-run crash a day earlier. Police hunted for the suspected driver, identified as Julio Acevedo, saying he was barreling down a residential street in a BMW at twice the speed limit early Sunday when he collided with a car hired to take the couple to the hospital after the mother, seven months pregnant, felt ill. "The mood in the neighborhood is very heavy," said Oscar Sabel, a retired printer who lives near the scene of the accident.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Through Oct. 17, Philly.com and the Inquirer will publish a profile a day of transformative moments reported by breast cancer patients. The full series can be seen at www.philly.com/breastcancer Jessica Territo was diagnosed with breast cancer a month after giving birth. She noticed a little swelling when breast-feeding, and her obstetrician sent her for tests. A needle biopsy revealed Stage Two cancer. She was 33, mother of a newborn and a 3-year-old. Jessica, in South Florida, took the most aggressive path - chemotherapy to shrink the tumor and then surgery to remove it. The chemo was so powerful that it hospitalized her for four days.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | By Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO - From the day Mariana Migon discovered she was pregnant, she knew she wanted a natural birth. So just weeks before her due date, the first-time mother abandoned her obstetrician, her health plan, and her private hospital room for the free public hospital in downtown Rio - where she had a real chance at a vaginal birth. "If I'd stayed with my health-care plan and my doctor, I would have had a C-section," said Migon, as she sat beside the incubator holding her baby girl, who was premature.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beth Goldberg couldn't believe how the birth of her first child got away from her. It was every woman's nightmare: A lot of drugs were used, a fetal monitor was hooked up, and there was an infection, a drop in blood pressure, and, in the end, an emergency cesarean section. "I thought, I'm going to turn this into something good," says the Philly resident and mother of three. "I wanted a different view of birth, to learn about it as if it is a normal, physical event. " After spending a decade as a midwife, she has morphed her experience into a different branch of birthing: training doulas.
NEWS
February 9, 2009
WHY IS A WOMAN who already has six kids so thrilled with childbirth that she would experiment with in-vitro insemination? With no father to support them, I guess the state has to bear the brunt of the expenses. Is this fair to the taxpayers of the state of California? I believe that you don't have the "right" to bring children into the world unless you are prepared to support and care for them. Maybe she should see a psychiatrist. Joe Hamilton Philadelphia
NEWS
October 17, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Schnabel Reed, 62, of Haddonfield, a nurse and childbirth expert who taught thousands of parents how to care for their babies, died Sunday of breast cancer at Hahnemann University Hospital. For 25 years, Mrs. Reed conducted "Baby and Me" sessions and taught always-booked classes for expectant parents at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees. The mother of eight, she conducted Lamaze childbirth classes from home when her children were young. Though she never took drugs during their births, she advised other women to get epidurals for pain, her daughter Amanda said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
RICKI LAKE is ticked off at doctors and she's firing back. Lake, whose film "The Business of Being Born" is a documentary about maternity care, and who's shown in the film giving birth in her apartment, is mad that physicians groups have singled her out for bringing attention to at-home childbirth. The former talk-show host was named in a recent statement by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, saying that the home is not the safest setting for having a baby.
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