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Childhood

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NEWS
March 4, 1986
I reply to Claude Lewis' Feb. 24 column, "Who says there are not heroes nowadays?" I am certain that Mr. Lewis did not have any idea that his column would be set directly above the pitiful sketch of a pregnant child, replete with doll. The sketch went with a column by Neal Peirce, "Health care for teenagers," the content of which makes Mr. Lewis' plea for heroes read like pious nonsense. How can contemporary teenagers have time to look for and emulate heroic figures? They are too busy trying to survive in high schools and homes, that, more than not, resemble emotional battle zones.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | By Ellen Goodman
Now that we have repealed welfare, I have a modest proposal. Let's go all the way and rescind childhood. Childhood has become far too burdensome for the American public to bear. It isn't good for the country. It isn't even good for children who are captured in an unwholesome and prolonged state of dependency. The whole idea of childhood, it should be remembered, is nothing but an anachronistic leftover from the original liberals. Before the so-called Enlightenment, before Rousseau, before the left-wing conspiracy of 18th-century do-gooders, the young were dressed, worked, and looked upon as short adults.
LIVING
September 2, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
For more than 40 years, Merritt's Museum of Childhood was a tourist attraction on Route 422 outside Reading. It grew out of a doll museum established in 1963 by Mary and Robert J. Merritt, for Mary Merritt's private collection. The second museum was added after Robert Merritt noticed that while women and girls would come in to look at the dolls, men and boys stayed outside. The new spot for the guys first was called Merritt's Early Americana Museum, then Merritt's Historical Museum, and finally the Museum of Childhood.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The childhood memoir offers inviting but treacherous terrain where it's all too easy for a writer to get burned - a fate that, with one major exception, Charlayne Woodard avoids in Pretty Fire. Adults who can magically and accurately conjure the fears, fantasies and perspectives of childhood rather than merely filter them through later experience are rare indeed. It is a gift that is one reason for Steven Spielberg's immense success as a filmmaker, and it's one that Woodard shares.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
FIRST Clarabelle and Captain Kangaroo, then Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smith and now Willie the Worm. My youth is slowly dying! We never heard of ADD in our day. Rest in peace and thanks for your great childhood entertainment. By the way - has anyone heard from Sally Starr, Lamb Chop or Bertie the Bunyip lately? Bill Kelley Jamison, Pa.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
STATE REP. Louise Bishop was 12 years old when her stepfather stripped her of her innocence in the middle of the night inside their Georgia home. The Philly Democrat shared her story Thursday with City Council, which voted 16 to 0 to pass a resolution sponsored by Councilmen Bill Greenlee and Denny O'Brien urging the state Legislature to move forward on bills that would protect victims of childhood sexual abuse. Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez was absent. "No one really understands what these young men and women experience, unless you've been there," said Bishop.
NEWS
October 13, 1998 | By Crispin Sartwell
My daughter Emma is 10. She works full time. Her school year keeps getting longer, and her school day, too: 8:15 to 4. Last year, she had recess once a day; now it's a half hour on Thursdays. She's at work more than I am. Emma's school is excellent. But we've entered the era of educational overkill. Some school systems have eliminated summer vacation, or are talking about it. Several have dumped recess entirely. These developments suggest that we have fundamentally misapprehended what childhood is. Childhood does not exist to produce useful adults.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After they receive their diplomas in childhood studies this month, three Rutgers-Camden students are likely to continue to face the same assumptions and questions they have for the last six years. Theirs is the study of childhood, not children per se or child psychology, and Rutgers says they are trailblazers in the first such doctoral program in North America. "Ninety-nine percent of the time, people would be, like, 'Oh, so you want to become a preschool teacher,' " said Lara Saguisag.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By Lisa Ross
Just in case federal regulators think there is a future in controlling the entertainment industry's assault on America's children, I offer this reality check from the suburbs: There is no childhood here, and there hasn't been for quite some time. For families living in California's suburban communities, where the line between childhood and adulthood has been eroding since the Yuppie Revolution, a widely reported Federal Trade Commission study released last month detailing the deliberate marketing of explicit violent and sexual adult entertainment to children was not much of a news flash.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Oct. 14, 1986, five women - ranging in age from 23 to 38 - gathered inside Room 57 to talk about "the big family secret. " None of the five were related. They were strangers to each other, but not to the secret they shared. Each of them had grown up with an alcoholic mother or father. Each of them had either married or was involved with an alcoholic husband or boyfriend. To Linda Slavin and Lori Tucker, two counselors at CORA (Counseling or Referral Assistance) Services Inc., a private, nonprofit agency, the five women were considered "Adult Children of Alcoholics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 18, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
After traveling those great distances from innocence to manhood, from idealizing sports to covering them professionally, from passion to advocacy, Ray Didinger discovered a play. The former Daily News sportswriter found the theatrical inspiration close to where his boyhood views collided with the gritty games and athletes he chronicled, very near the place where his mind and heart were in frequent debate. Tommy and Me is Didinger's recounting of a lengthy, heartfelt, and often complex relationship with his boyhood idol, Eagles flanker Tommy McDonald.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
ISSUE | SEXUAL ABUSE Senate's cowardice It is horrifying that Pennsylvania's Senate Judiciary Committee lacked the courage and wisdom to allow victims of childhood sexual abuse to seek justice retroactively ("Pa. panel dials back sex-abuse measure," June 29) and that the Senate passed an amended bill 49-0 on Thursday. There must be room for the provision to be found constitutional given that Sen. John Rafferty Jr. of Delaware County, who is running for state attorney general, had no issues with it. And the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association and several high-level prosecutors have supported retroactivity for years.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, STAFF WRITER
On a wet afternoon at Crosswicks Wildlife Sanctuary in Abington Township, Leigh Altadonna walked the muddy trails, searching through binoculars for a breeding pair of wood thrushes, a species in decline, and remembering a childhood day 60 years ago when he saw a robin in the woods behind his Glenside home, carrying mud from a pond to build its nest. He's been a fervent birder ever since. "It doesn't take an exotic bird to get you into this," he said. "For me, it was a robin. " Altadonna, 67, is a benevolent guiding spirit at Crosswicks - Pennsylvania's only National Audubon Society sanctuary - rambling through its 13 acres as knowingly as he once walked the woods of his youth, eyes and ears attuned to the moving tapestry of birds from the forest floor to the tree canopy 100 feet above.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
We see all kinds of symptoms. An 8-year-old boy with a badly swollen jaw due to an infection. A 2-year-old boy who weighs what a 1-year-old should because he can't eat solid foods. A 6-year-old girl who can't fall asleep at night or pay attention in school. A 4-year-old who gets teased at preschool because he "talks funny. " One look inside their mouths, and the telltale erosions and cavernous divots on their "baby teeth" bring to light the probable cause of all these problems that cause so much pain and disability, and yet are so preventable.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
"Many things we need can wait. The child cannot. Now is the time his bones are being formed, his blood is being made, his mind is being developed. To him we cannot say tomorrow, his name is today. " - Gabriela Mistral, Chilean Poet, Nobel Laureate The main aim of pediatrics is prevention. Prevention of diseases, of injury, of emotional problems, of developmental and intellectual delays. Our armamentarium include vaccines; screening instruments; and guidance on development, safety, and nutrition.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Standing in front of a toy kitchen in a Mantua preschool classroom, Gov. Wolf said Thursday that he wants to spend $60 million more on early childhood education in 2017. Wolf made the announcement alongside Mayor Kenney, whose ambitious education agenda includes a push for universal prekindergarten that would cost the city a projected $60 million - separate from any state boost - in 2017. With the fiscal 2016 state budget still not in place, and education funding one of the chief sticking points, Wolf's proposal, which also includes a $200 million boost for K-12 education, is far from a lock.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
First, Mayor Kenney handled the important business: reading a picture book called My Friends to a group of spellbound 4-year-olds. Next, he talked about what he calls one of the biggest priorities of his administration: opening prekindergarten seats to "as many children as we can reach. " Kenney and Pedro Rivera, Pennsylvania's top education official, traveled Tuesday to a Northeast early-childhood education center to tout the recent release of state funds that will pay for 1,500 new prekindergarten seats.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Anna Okropiribce, 16, drinks from the water fountains at Northeast High School only when she's "desperate. " The water is warm and metallic-tasting. "It's pretty gross," she said. "Once, I filled up my water bottle, and the water wasn't clear. It was gray. I got scared. I was like, I don't know if I should drink this. " That's cause for concern, given that poor water intake is a likely factor in a startling phenomenon outlined in research published Thursday by a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia doctor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
CHILDHOOD'S END. 8 tonight, Tuesday and Wednesday, Syfy. Can science fiction and religion co-exist? Mike Vogel doesn't see why not. "I think God created us with an imagination, and for me, science fiction, it's the ultimate in opening the expanse of what's possible," said the Warminster-raised star of "Childhood's End. " The three-night miniseries premieres tonight on Syfy. Vogel, who spent some time at the Christian Philadelphia College of Bible (now Cairn University)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015
Q: My parents recently told me and my brothers that they are selling our childhood home. They want me to take all the furniture and my old toys, or they are going to donate it all. I can't store all that in my place. I thought my parents would keep it until I had kids of my own. - Leah A: It's common to keep all kinds of things when we have room, such as at your parents' house, and it's a problem only once space runs out or a situation changes. Your parents have every right to sell their house, and they shouldn't be expected to keep your old things once you move out. Remember: They are giving you fair warning.
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