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Childhood

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NEWS
March 4, 1986
I reply to Claude Lewis' Feb. 24 column, "Who says there are not heroes nowadays?" I am certain that Mr. Lewis did not have any idea that his column would be set directly above the pitiful sketch of a pregnant child, replete with doll. The sketch went with a column by Neal Peirce, "Health care for teenagers," the content of which makes Mr. Lewis' plea for heroes read like pious nonsense. How can contemporary teenagers have time to look for and emulate heroic figures? They are too busy trying to survive in high schools and homes, that, more than not, resemble emotional battle zones.
NEWS
August 12, 1996 | By Ellen Goodman
Now that we have repealed welfare, I have a modest proposal. Let's go all the way and rescind childhood. Childhood has become far too burdensome for the American public to bear. It isn't good for the country. It isn't even good for children who are captured in an unwholesome and prolonged state of dependency. The whole idea of childhood, it should be remembered, is nothing but an anachronistic leftover from the original liberals. Before the so-called Enlightenment, before Rousseau, before the left-wing conspiracy of 18th-century do-gooders, the young were dressed, worked, and looked upon as short adults.
LIVING
September 2, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
For more than 40 years, Merritt's Museum of Childhood was a tourist attraction on Route 422 outside Reading. It grew out of a doll museum established in 1963 by Mary and Robert J. Merritt, for Mary Merritt's private collection. The second museum was added after Robert Merritt noticed that while women and girls would come in to look at the dolls, men and boys stayed outside. The new spot for the guys first was called Merritt's Early Americana Museum, then Merritt's Historical Museum, and finally the Museum of Childhood.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The childhood memoir offers inviting but treacherous terrain where it's all too easy for a writer to get burned - a fate that, with one major exception, Charlayne Woodard avoids in Pretty Fire. Adults who can magically and accurately conjure the fears, fantasies and perspectives of childhood rather than merely filter them through later experience are rare indeed. It is a gift that is one reason for Steven Spielberg's immense success as a filmmaker, and it's one that Woodard shares.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
FIRST Clarabelle and Captain Kangaroo, then Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smith and now Willie the Worm. My youth is slowly dying! We never heard of ADD in our day. Rest in peace and thanks for your great childhood entertainment. By the way - has anyone heard from Sally Starr, Lamb Chop or Bertie the Bunyip lately? Bill Kelley Jamison, Pa.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
STATE REP. Louise Bishop was 12 years old when her stepfather stripped her of her innocence in the middle of the night inside their Georgia home. The Philly Democrat shared her story Thursday with City Council, which voted 16 to 0 to pass a resolution sponsored by Councilmen Bill Greenlee and Denny O'Brien urging the state Legislature to move forward on bills that would protect victims of childhood sexual abuse. Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez was absent. "No one really understands what these young men and women experience, unless you've been there," said Bishop.
NEWS
October 13, 1998 | By Crispin Sartwell
My daughter Emma is 10. She works full time. Her school year keeps getting longer, and her school day, too: 8:15 to 4. Last year, she had recess once a day; now it's a half hour on Thursdays. She's at work more than I am. Emma's school is excellent. But we've entered the era of educational overkill. Some school systems have eliminated summer vacation, or are talking about it. Several have dumped recess entirely. These developments suggest that we have fundamentally misapprehended what childhood is. Childhood does not exist to produce useful adults.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After they receive their diplomas in childhood studies this month, three Rutgers-Camden students are likely to continue to face the same assumptions and questions they have for the last six years. Theirs is the study of childhood, not children per se or child psychology, and Rutgers says they are trailblazers in the first such doctoral program in North America. "Ninety-nine percent of the time, people would be, like, 'Oh, so you want to become a preschool teacher,' " said Lara Saguisag.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By Lisa Ross
Just in case federal regulators think there is a future in controlling the entertainment industry's assault on America's children, I offer this reality check from the suburbs: There is no childhood here, and there hasn't been for quite some time. For families living in California's suburban communities, where the line between childhood and adulthood has been eroding since the Yuppie Revolution, a widely reported Federal Trade Commission study released last month detailing the deliberate marketing of explicit violent and sexual adult entertainment to children was not much of a news flash.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Oct. 14, 1986, five women - ranging in age from 23 to 38 - gathered inside Room 57 to talk about "the big family secret. " None of the five were related. They were strangers to each other, but not to the secret they shared. Each of them had grown up with an alcoholic mother or father. Each of them had either married or was involved with an alcoholic husband or boyfriend. To Linda Slavin and Lori Tucker, two counselors at CORA (Counseling or Referral Assistance) Services Inc., a private, nonprofit agency, the five women were considered "Adult Children of Alcoholics.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Valery Swope, 18, answered her phone one afternoon in March. It was Cabrini College, telling her she had been accepted. "I feel so great. Oh, my Lord. I've got to tell everybody!" First, she posed for a selfie. "I've got to take a picture of this face!" Then she got on the phone. The first six people she called were two caseworkers with the state child welfare agency, two social workers appointed by the court, a child-advocate in the public defender's office, and an FBI agent.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As a pediatrician at the Cobbs Creek Primary Care Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Roy Wade Jr. employs the usual tools of his trade, such as thermometer, tongue depressor, and stethoscope. But as a researcher, he is working to develop a different kind of tool kit: a questionnaire to help pediatricians figure out which of their young patients are at greatest risk to develop early cognitive, emotional, and health problems. Wade's work builds on the landmark 1998 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences)
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer
Theater has many applications. It can entertain. It can provoke intellectual debate. It can serve as a temporary distraction from the grind of everyday life. But Delaware County resident Michael Broussard uses theater to help him cope with being a victim of childhood sexual abuse. And he hopes his one-man production, "Ask A Sex Abuse Survivor," being staged this weekend in Elkins Park, may help others who have suffered this most heinous of crimes to deal with its often emotionally debilitating aftermath.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration on Tuesday laid out an ambitious vision for assuring that all children in Philadelphia benefit from high-quality early learning experiences. Labeled "A Running Start Philadelphia: For Every Child, Birth to Five," the outline offers guidance on how the city can guarantee the best learning opportunities for its youngest citizens as a way to offset the long-term, systemic poverty in some neighborhoods. "With this plan, Philadelphia has developed a strategy to support its children and families by building stronger schools to create a more competitive workforce," Nutter said.
NEWS
May 7, 2015
LIKE A DOG chasing a car, George Bochetto has been chasing Muhammad Ali's Louisville, Ky., birthplace for some time. And now that he has it, he's not precisely sure what he will do with it. Whatever it is, it will be done with dignity. The Center City lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner feels it is a shrine, and should be treated as one, but the details are still forming. It's an understatement to say that Bochetto, a onetime boxer himself, is a devotee of the former heavyweight champion, humanitarian and onetime resident of Cherry Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child of black nationalists in West Philadelphia, Asali Solomon suffered through her share of bizarre public-library Kwanzaa celebrations. Along with Thanksgiving, she got Umoja Karamu. It made her an outsider at Henry C. Lea School, and it didn't help her social standing when she transferred to the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, either. Everyone's childhood has its own particular angst, but Solomon's, at least, provided inspiration for her debut novel, Disgruntled . It was released in February by Farrar Straus Giroux, and she'll read from it on Thursday at 7 p.m. at the University of the Arts' Connelly Auditorium (211 S. Broad St., Philadelphia)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2015
QUINCEANERAS are a big deal. Participants wear Cinderella gowns and tiaras, and often participate in a Catholic Mass during which they are presented with Bibles, jewelry and other symbols of adulthood. As a preteen, Amber Andujar of Camden looked forward to this Hispanic coming-of-age ceremony with a sweet naivete. But that was before tragedy struck and her innocence was snatched away during a brutal home invasion. It happened on her birthday back on Sept. 2, 2012. Amber, then 12, and her three siblings were home alone when a knife-wielding intruder broke into their home on Ware Street and sexually assaulted her at knifepoint.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
BOSCH. Today, Amazon Prime Video. TITUS WELLIVER is more binge-reader than binge-watcher. "I like to watch something and let it sort of gestate," said the star of Amazon Studios' new cop drama "Bosch," in a recent interview. "I kind of read voraciously. I've always got, like, three books going at the same time. " In "Bosch," based on Michael Connelly's best-selling books and premiering today on Amazon Prime, Welliver, who spent a chunk of his childhood in Philadelphia, plays Los Angeles police detective Harry Bosch.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Mike Newall
Amber Hellesten had the small knife in her pocket that frigid night in South Philadelphia. Had it close. She was 15 and said she carried the knife because she was afraid. Afraid from years of abuse. Afraid of the men who beat her mother. Afraid of the man who attacked her when she was 13. She'd see that man outside the drug clinic some mornings on her walks to school. She didn't know Azim Chaplin. He was 14 and walking down Snyder Avenue with two friends last February. Azim and his friends followed Amber and her friend for blocks, taunting them with gibes over their clothing and sneakers and throwing ice balls and garbage.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
ONE DAY in 1991, when Byron Walker-Bey was 11, he went to Strawberry Mansion Middle School with a paring knife in his pocket. Now 36, he can't remember why. "It was a knife you peel apples with," Walker-Bey said with the smiling openness that is his trademark. "I wasn't bringing it there to harm anybody. " The knife fell out of his pocket. He was ordered to perform community service. His ceramics teacher steered him to the Clay Studio in Old City. "I was a kid around grown-ups whose lives were dedicated to art," said Walker-Bey, who works as a security guard.
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