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Childhood Obesity

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NEWS
September 15, 2012
First, the good news on childhood obesity in Philadelphia: Rates among schoolchildren have fallen significantly over the past four years. Between 2006 and 2010, the rate dropped nearly 5 percent, while national obesity rates remained unchanged, according to a new study coauthored by city Health Commissioner Donald Schwarz. Researchers are reluctant to give too much credit for the decline to recent efforts by the city to combat obesity. But the findings are encouraging in the battle against the bulge.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, with childhood obesity on what seemed to be a scary rise toward infinity, Philadelphia was among the first cities to report a short-term drop. With that tentative finding replicated, more or less, around the country, a new Philadelphia study has found longer-term evidence of a reversal in the 30-year trend. Considering that obesity rates tripled over that period, the recent changes are small and the burden remains large: 20.3 percent of city public school students were obese in 2012-13, down from 21.7 percent in 2006-07.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tantalizing evidence that America's epidemic of childhood obesity might be starting to subside was presented Sunday by researchers who also found that the trend could be speeded up through school programs. Several recent studies reported that rates of overweight and obese children plateaued after rising rapidly since 1980. But this is the first major study to detect a decline - of 4 percent - and it was in a national sample dominated by low-income blacks and Hispanics, the groups at highest risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010
A FEW WEEKS ago, I did a health and wellness presentation to a group of concerned parents and their children at the Christian Stronghold Baptist Church in West Philadelphia. Many of the participants were surprised about what they didn't know about general health and fitness and even more surprised when it came to facts about children's health. Parents were shocked when I said many American teens have arteries so clogged they could suffer a heart attack. "Are you serious?" one parent asked.
NEWS
May 3, 2010 | By Neal Barnard
More exercise, less soda. This has been a mantra among those battling childhood obesity, and many school health initiatives have taken it up. But why? While exercise is important for health, studies show the childhood obesity epidemic has little to do with lack of physical activity. And while sodas, candy bars, and other typical vending-machine items clearly aren't health foods, the majority of children don't buy food from vending machines on any given day. However, 31 million American children do eat in school cafeterias, and many of them are from the poor households that are most likely to suffer from obesity and obesity-related illnesses.
NEWS
April 22, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kris Sumey went to Temple University's Liacouras Center yesterday because, she said, "My whole family is overweight. " Sylvaneta Lewis' motivation was her 8-year-old daughter, who "is overweight for her age. " The two mothers were among 550 people registered for a conference run by Shaping America's Youth (SAY), a nonprofit group based in Portland, Ore., aimed at educating parents and other caregivers about childhood obesity. For years the medical community has urged overweight Americans to eat less, eat healthy and exercise.
NEWS
August 11, 2006 | By Amy B. Jordan
In 1946, George Orwell wrote a rant on the "silly words and expressions" he was observing in the world around him. He worried that the language was being used, not as an instrument for expression, but as a tool for "concealing and preventing thought. " He could have been writing about today's cultural politics of weight and food. Right now, a committee of experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Medical Association and others is considering changes to the language used to describe children with weight problems.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | By Beth Trapani
Pennsylvania schools have a terrific opportunity to confront one of our nation's most pervasive public health problems: childhood obesity. One in three American kids is overweight, and national health experts such as former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher agree that the associated health problems are threatening to make this generation of children the first in our history who will not outlive their parents. So why should schools, already overburdened with government mandates and high-stakes testing, be charged with addressing the problem?
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
It never fails. As I make my way to St. Christopher's Hospital for Children each morning, I get stuck at a traffic light in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. The intersection is a hub for several elementary and high schools and a large YMCA. Lately I have become obsessed by a small store with a line of children waiting at the counter, wiping the sleep out of their eyes and taking away black plastic bags full of doughnuts. Why this obsession? To me, it is a small piece of a great health epidemic facing our nation and our city: childhood obesity.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Philly celebrated March Madness by applying a full-court press on childhood obesity last month. Just last week, officials cut the ribbon on a gleaming, 71,000-square-foot ShopRite in Hunting Park West, one of those parched "food desert" communities in North Philly where there's a corner store at every intersection but no supermarket to be found. To add to the bounty, the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded Temple's Center for Obesity Research and Education (CORE) a five-year, $3.7 million grant to study the link between what parents feed their children and why kids get fat. For the first time, CORE researchers will be able to put everything they've studied about children's eating behavior over the last decade into a nutrition education program that will teach parents how to healthily feed their children.
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NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Kids have tried. Parents have tried. Health professionals have tried. But according to the American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the last 30 years. These children are at increased risk for adult diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. The annual hospital costs related to childhood obesity and its attendant problems - comorbidities - is roughly $127 million, according to the institute.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, with childhood obesity on what seemed to be a scary rise toward infinity, Philadelphia was among the first cities to report a short-term drop. With that tentative finding replicated, more or less, around the country, a new Philadelphia study has found longer-term evidence of a reversal in the 30-year trend. Considering that obesity rates tripled over that period, the recent changes are small and the burden remains large: 20.3 percent of city public school students were obese in 2012-13, down from 21.7 percent in 2006-07.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014
BEING THE mother of a 6-year-old, I go to lots of children's birthday parties. I've been noticing a phenomenon called precocious puberty, which hits girls especially hard, though increasingly I've noticed it in boys, too. I'll find myself thinking, "Whoa! She's 7? She's developing breasts and looks like a little woman!" Or, "My goodness, he's 8 and already taller than me!" Witnessing this has made me curious and, along with other moms I talk with, I'm concerned, worried and bewildered.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
FIRST ladies aren't normally given to sharp rebukes of Congress, but we can't blame Michelle Obama for being a bit peeved at the efforts of some on Capitol Hill to roll back school nutrition standards. At the request of certain special-interest groups, House Republicans are backing a provision in the 2015 funding bill that would give schools the option of waiving the standards for one year in districts where the lunch program is losing money. It should come as no surprise that some in the food industry - particularly those who make such questionable menu items as mini-pizzas loaded with high-fat cheese or deep-fried chicken nuggets that no longer make the nutritional cut - are balking at the standards.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
  KATLYN GRASSO, 20, a Wharton School junior, is CEO and founder of GenHERation, an online leadership portal for high school girls. GenHERation provides girls with an opportunity to work with national corporations and nonprofits to become catalysts for social change. Grasso has raised about $25,000 from various Wharton grants and venture funds to start up GenHERation. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for GenHERation? A: I've always been passionate about helping girls achieve personally and professionally.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013
IT'S A FACT: One in every eight American preschoolers and one in six older children and teens are obese. But finally, after more than three decades of steady escalation, childhood obesity numbers are coming down! Last fall, a study showed the first glimmer of hope: that the rates were falling in American cities, including Philly - down 5 percent. Now, a study released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a decline in obesity rates among low-income preschoolers in 19 of the 43 U.S. states and territories studied.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Beth Wallace Smith, a registered dietitian at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, wrote this for the Healthy Kids blog at Philly.com. Looking for another reason children should step away from the TV? You can add "contributes to obesity" to the list. A report from the World Health Organization's European office stated that the marketing of junk food to children through commercials and social media has become "disastrously effective. " Now with one in three children in America considered overweight or obese, could part of the answer really be a remote click away?
NEWS
July 12, 2013
TODAY, THE CITY will unveil a new anti-poverty strategy, and since ours is one of the poorest big cities in the nation, it's not a moment too soon. Poverty is a complicated problem, but recent headway that the city has made on childhood obesity may provide optimism for our ability to grapple with this seemingly intractable problem. Like poverty, childhood obesity is complex: driven by poverty, policy and other cultural and social factors, all of which has, in the past 30 years, doubled the rate of obesity in children and tripled it in adolescents.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013
Congratulations to Frank Patton, who answered 11 out of 12 questions correct to win Kimberly Garrison's fitness quiz. DESPITE the national outcry over childhood obesity and related health issues, American children aren't getting adequate exercise or enough servings of vegetables and fruits every day. What's worse, many public school systems, including Philadelphia's, are being forced into draconian budget cuts that are further dismantling fitness...
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Phila. schools nation on obesity Washington is making progress toward assuring schools provide healthier food with proposed standards for food sold in most schools. The regulations are part of a set of changes under the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, a key component of Michelle Obama's "Let's Move" campaign to reduce childhood obesity. In addition to the modifications put in place by the act, which placed standards on the nutritional content of cafeteria meals, the amendment proposes to apply similar nutrition standards to foods sold outside the cafeteria.
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