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Chimpanzees

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NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An elementary-school library book that Jane Goodall wrote about chimpanzees inspired Amanda Ketterer to start raising money for the renowned author and anthropologist. So the Cherry Hill student set up a lemonade stand in the front yard of her home and took in $5.50 from her parents, the sole customers. That was in 2006. Amanda is now 15 and has raised nearly $15,000 to support the work of the Jane Goodall Institute, which seeks to preserve habitats, protect the environment, and educate young people through worldwide research, education, and advocacy.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
As a child growing up in England, she played with worms and other "creepy crawlies," followed the exploits of Dr. Doolittle and Tarzan and dreamed of one day going to Africa to study animals. After years of scrimping and saving, young Jane Goodall had enough money for a boat trip to the Dark Continent, where she met renowned anthropologist Louis Leakey and persuaded him to sponsor her in a long-term study of chimpanzees in the wild. Today, after 26 years - and numerous awards, books and television documentaries - Goodall is still there.
NEWS
April 1, 1996 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If the movie 12 Monkeys were remade as a documentary, it could be filmed in rural East Rockhill. In what is being hailed as a precedent-setting move, 12 chimpanzees will be freed from their cramped metal cages in the basement of Buckshire Corp., a breeding and biomedical research facility. An agreement was announced last week to remove these intelligent primates to a sanctuary where they will live out their natural lives in more spacious and social quarters. At Buckshire, they were used to test vaccines for infectious diseases.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Donna Bryson, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Chimpanzees at a sanctuary founded by famed primatologist Jane Goodall pulled a Texas graduate student into their fenced-off enclosure, dragging him nearly a half-mile and biting his ear and hands. Andrew F. Oberle was giving a lecture to tourists at the Chimp Eden sanctuary on Thursday when two chimpanzees grabbed his feet and pulled him under a fence into their enclosure, said Jeffrey Wicks of the Netcare911 emergency services company. The 26-year-old anthropology student at the University of Texas at San Antonio suffered "multiple and severe bite wounds," Wicks said.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | By Linda Koebner
It was an embrace we had not enjoyed for 19 years. As we wrapped our arms around each other, questions dissolved into tears and grins. This powerful moment I shared was with a 32-year-old, 150-pound chimpanzee named Swing. When she was seven, Swing came into my care from a laboratory where she had been a participant in hepatitis research. She and seven other chimps came to us as part of an experiment to judge whether ex-lab chimps could adjust to life in a social group after years in single cages.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Khalil Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday morning at the Agnes Irwin School, world-renowned scientist and activist Jane Goodall used her sense of humor - and a stuffed chimpanzee - to engage students on some serious issues. More than 150 lower-school students listened closely as Goodall, 81, shared her celebrated experiences with chimpanzees. She also spoke of hope for the future and the importance of environmental activism. She even drew quite a few laughs, especially when she directed the crowd to later search the Internet for "an octopus with coconut shells.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Janet McConnaughey, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Chimpanzees that have spent their lives in U.S. research labs being prodded, poked, and tested may be headed for retirement in a leafy sanctuary where they can climb trees, socialize at will, play with toys, even listen to music. More than 300 chimpanzees should be retired from government-funded research and sent to live in a sprawling refuge outfitted with play areas under a recommendation approved Tuesday by a top national panel of scientists. The proposal from a National Institutes of Health committee is the latest step in a gradual shift away from using chimps as test subjects, because of technological advances and because of ethical concerns about their close relation to humans.
LIVING
July 21, 1997 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an overpopulation of research chimpanzees reaching "crisis" proportions, a National Research Council committee has recommended transferring ownership of the animals to the federal government and securing funding to provide adequate long-term care. This would involve placing the chimps in sanctuaries or other facilities with outdoor areas and providing for their complex behavioral and social needs. The alternative, which the committee said should not be used, would be euthanizing the animals.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Jennifer Gould, Special to The Inquirer
She could have been a British schoolteacher: tiny, trim, with her gray hair pulled neatly back from a face that could only be described as handsome. She seemed frail as she stood on the podium, her voice just above a whisper. But then Jane Goodall addressed the crowd of 1,000 with a typical chimpanzee greeting - a lung-filled howl that gripped the room, a howl she said she had used to address the United Nations and the European Parliament. That howl was convincing evidence that Goodall, while small, is equipped with inner strength that has sustained her in her work over three decades in the Gombe National Park on Lake Tanganyika in Tanzania.
NEWS
June 30, 2012
Church of Nativity wins U.N. listing BETHLEHEM, West Bank - The Palestinians on Friday persuaded the U.N. cultural agency to list the Church of the Nativity - the place where Christians believe Jesus was born - as an endangered World Heritage site despite misgivings by churches in charge of the basilica. The Palestinians hailed the nod by UNESCO as a step forward in their quest for recognition of an independent Palestine in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem, captured by Israel in 1967.
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NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Khalil Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuesday morning at the Agnes Irwin School, world-renowned scientist and activist Jane Goodall used her sense of humor - and a stuffed chimpanzee - to engage students on some serious issues. More than 150 lower-school students listened closely as Goodall, 81, shared her celebrated experiences with chimpanzees. She also spoke of hope for the future and the importance of environmental activism. She even drew quite a few laughs, especially when she directed the crowd to later search the Internet for "an octopus with coconut shells.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An elementary-school library book that Jane Goodall wrote about chimpanzees inspired Amanda Ketterer to start raising money for the renowned author and anthropologist. So the Cherry Hill student set up a lemonade stand in the front yard of her home and took in $5.50 from her parents, the sole customers. That was in 2006. Amanda is now 15 and has raised nearly $15,000 to support the work of the Jane Goodall Institute, which seeks to preserve habitats, protect the environment, and educate young people through worldwide research, education, and advocacy.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Janet McConnaughey, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Chimpanzees that have spent their lives in U.S. research labs being prodded, poked, and tested may be headed for retirement in a leafy sanctuary where they can climb trees, socialize at will, play with toys, even listen to music. More than 300 chimpanzees should be retired from government-funded research and sent to live in a sprawling refuge outfitted with play areas under a recommendation approved Tuesday by a top national panel of scientists. The proposal from a National Institutes of Health committee is the latest step in a gradual shift away from using chimps as test subjects, because of technological advances and because of ethical concerns about their close relation to humans.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Donna Bryson, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Chimpanzees at a sanctuary founded by famed primatologist Jane Goodall pulled a Texas graduate student into their fenced-off enclosure, dragging him nearly a half-mile and biting his ear and hands. Andrew F. Oberle was giving a lecture to tourists at the Chimp Eden sanctuary on Thursday when two chimpanzees grabbed his feet and pulled him under a fence into their enclosure, said Jeffrey Wicks of the Netcare911 emergency services company. The 26-year-old anthropology student at the University of Texas at San Antonio suffered "multiple and severe bite wounds," Wicks said.
NEWS
June 30, 2012
Church of Nativity wins U.N. listing BETHLEHEM, West Bank - The Palestinians on Friday persuaded the U.N. cultural agency to list the Church of the Nativity - the place where Christians believe Jesus was born - as an endangered World Heritage site despite misgivings by churches in charge of the basilica. The Palestinians hailed the nod by UNESCO as a step forward in their quest for recognition of an independent Palestine in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem, captured by Israel in 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
Breathtaking images of animals in the African wilderness are packaged for a G-rating and an audience of children in Chimpanzee, a documentary from the Disneynature label. Filmmaker Alastair Fothergill (who codirected Disneynature's African Cats ) spent three years in the jungles of the Ivory Coast capturing 700 hours of rare, beautiful footage detailing the complex, dramatic and, at times, quite moving lives of a chimpanzee clan. The job of narrating the material has been given to Tim Allen (was Morgan Freeman unavailable?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By Matt Huston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Animals acting like humans? That's nothing new for Disney. But, usually, the film characters are imaginary. Oscar the chimp and his family are stunningly human: They exhibit tenderness, frustration, stoicism, and playfulness. They are the stars of Chimpanzee , the newest film from Disneynature — the nature-doc offshoot of Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group. They offer a drama of human proportions. The film, which opens Friday in advance of Earth Day, is the latest in a series of Disneynature releases that includes Earth (2009)
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Anyone doubting our evolutionary tie to other apes should check out that Philadelphia festival of food and fun known as Wing Bowl. The annual event has some striking parallels to behavior outlined in the article "Chimpanzee Hunting Behavior and Human Evolution," which appeared in the magazine American Scientist. Chimpanzees sometimes "go on hunting binges, in which they kill a large number of monkeys and other animals over a period of several days or weeks," the article states. The hunting is done mostly by males, though there are a few female hunters and the party is joined by many other females in estrus (heat)
NEWS
May 18, 2006 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As we branched off from each other on the evolutionary tree, our ancestors look to have made a messy break from those of chimpanzees. By comparing samples of chimp, gorilla and human DNA, scientists from MIT and Harvard say they see possible evidence of interspecies sex. But there's a problem with this finding, say paleontologists who study human origins. The geneticists are proposing that our ancestors were still mixing it up with those of the chimps until six million years ago - a time when one lineage was on all fours, the other already walking upright.
NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After testing samples from hundreds of monkeys being sold as "bush meat" in central Africa's markets, scientists have developed the most detailed theory yet for how the AIDS virus entered the human population. HIV-1, the most widespread of the viruses causing AIDS, apparently emerged through a chain of primates eating other primates - humans picking up the virus from chimpanzees, who acquired it from monkeys. The findings are published in today's issue of the journal Science.
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