CollectionsChina
IN THE NEWS

China

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - China's new president received a lavish welcome Friday as he made Moscow his first foreign destination, joining with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin in a pointed attempt to counter U.S. influence in Asia. Xi Jinping, who became president just last week, urged Russia to improve its foreign policy coordination to protect the two neighbors' joint security interests - comments that appeared to seek Russia's backing for his eagerness to reduce U.S. influence and challenge Japan over a set of disputed islands.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The fates of the United States and China have become linked in ways no one could have imagined 30 years ago. The two countries' economies have become so intertwined that historian Niall Ferguson has coined the term Chimerica . We buy China's goods, and the Chinese funnel billions of dollars back to support our deficit. They are a fast-rising power whose cooperation we need. Yet Chinese and American images of each other are frequently negative or misconstrued, and such misunderstandings can endanger relations.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Harvard-trained Lobsang Sangay, the Tibetan prime minister-in-exile, vowed to fight China's uncompromising approach toward Tibet during his swearing-in ceremony Monday, as he prepared to assume many of the political duties previously handled by the Dalai Lama. Speaking at the Tsuglakhang temple in Dharamsala, Sangay vowed to fight Beijing's "colonialism," and said his election sent "a clear message to the hard-liners in the Chinese government that Tibetan leadership is far from fizzling out. " After traditional offerings of tea and sweetened rice, Sangay, 43, took up his new post at exactly nine seconds after 9:09 a.m. Nine is considered an auspicious number associated with longevity among many Tibetans.
NEWS
March 10, 1987
The Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau deserves praise for enthusiastic preparations to make guests welcome during the bicentennial celebration of the Constitution, but it may have slipped in its latest report on the subject that begins: "When you hear that company's coming, you reach for the vacuum cleaner, the furniture polish, the newest china and your best smile. " Shouldn't that be oldest china? On a very special occasion you bring out the heirlooms.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The White House inched away yesterday from President Bush's unequivocal support of renewed trade breaks for China, suggesting that it might require China to curb human-rights abuses in exchange for the low tariffs. The unusual backpedaling came after Bush surprised aides Wednesday by telling reporters he wanted to continue most-favored-nation trading status for China - a highly controversial issue in Congress. Bush made his comments nearly three weeks before he was to make a formal decision on trade with China, and White House aides said he had not been presented with options on the matter.
NEWS
July 23, 1986
China's detention of New York Times Peking correspondent John F. Burns contradicts its efforts to portray itself as a society open to ideas, trade and tourism from the west. Mr. Burns, held nearly a week without being charged with any offense, and four days before being allowed visitors, is reportedly suspected of entering an area off limits to foreigners and spying during a recent motorcycle trip he took to central China. Mr. Burns' arrest seems like a throwback to China's worst days of deep suspicion of the West.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | by Richard Marks
Much has been written about problems in Sino-American relations. Human rights, the Hong Kong takeover and weapons trade with the Middle East have created apprehension. All of this needs to be addressed, but the 21st century cannot afford a new game with a new enemy. g1gues28RICHARD MARKS The Cold War is over. The United States, as the only major superpower, can afford to share the stage with an emerging China. Conditions are right for China's maturation. Government oppression cannot exist indefinitely.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - China's military is closing technical gaps that long have given the United States and its allies a military edge in Asia, although several ambitious new weapons systems and platforms appear years from completion, according to a new Pentagon assessment. China is developing a new stealth fighter, recently conducted sea trials on its first aircraft carrier, and carried out a record number of satellite and other space launches in the last year, the report notes. It says China appears on track toward building a modern, regionally focused military by 2020.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Mary Previte believes there are special times when a simple thank-you note just will not do to express gratitude. So she plans to embark on a journey this week halfway across the world, to hand-deliver a personal thank-you more than 70 years after a heroic deed saved her life. Previte, of Haddonfield, will travel to China to personally express her appreciation to the last member of a daring group of seven rescuers who liberated her and 1,500 others from a Japanese prison camp during World War II. It took 18 years for Previte to locate the last man - Wang Cheng-Han, who was the Chinese interpreter for the liberation team.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | By George F. Will
If China's object were to plunge U.S.-China relations into a polar frost, Jiang Zemin would be a suitable instrument. Before embarking for America, he explained that Einstein's theory of relativity somehow puts American and Chinese notions of political liberty on a moral par. He said that what China has done to Tibet is analogous to Lincoln's emancipation of the slaves. And, for good measure, Jiang dusted off that hoary Communist standard about "the most fundamental human right" being "adequate food and clothing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Answer: Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan. Sri Lanka is also a neighboring country, though separated by the sea.  
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Mary Previte believes there are special times when a simple thank-you note just will not do to express gratitude. So she plans to embark on a journey this week halfway across the world, to hand-deliver a personal thank-you more than 70 years after a heroic deed saved her life. Previte, of Haddonfield, will travel to China to personally express her appreciation to the last member of a daring group of seven rescuers who liberated her and 1,500 others from a Japanese prison camp during World War II. It took 18 years for Previte to locate the last man - Wang Cheng-Han, who was the Chinese interpreter for the liberation team.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
The Ghostbusters may not be afraid a no ghosts, but China is. The 1.36 billion people living in the world's No. 2 movie market, won't be able to see the new Ghostbusters movie, except as a bootleg, because the movie has been denied a theatrical release. (They never got to see the original Ghostbusters either.) According to The Hollywood Reporter, China's official censorship guidelines prohibit movies that "promote cults or superstition," going back to the days when the only allowable spirit was Chairman Mao 's. Disney's mega-hit Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest never opened in 2006, thanks to its ghouls.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Ikea will recall 1.7 million dressers in China, responding to international pressure to extend a sweeping recall announced two weeks ago in the United States and Canada, the Chinese government announced Tuesday. The move comes two days after the state-sponsored Chinese media blasted Ikea in an editorial, saying the Swedish company was showing "arrogance and stubbornness" by not recalling products already tied to six deaths in the United States. "Ikea is still acting petty and narrow-minded, making this incident appear more and more like a farce," the Xinhua News Agency wrote on Sunday, according to a translation in the Financial Times.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2016
Answer: Pakistan. It borders Afghanistan, China, India, and Iran.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Jeremy Roebuck, and Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITERS
On nights when Xiaoxing Xi can't sleep, his mind races through the possibilities of what may have started it all. He thinks back to emails that could have prompted the FBI probe. About conversations that might have drawn the armed agents to his home. Through the events that left him publicly labeled a Chinese spy. It's been nearly a year since federal prosecutors accused Xi, a world renowned Temple University physicist, of selling scientific secrets with potential military applications to China.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | Steve Bohnel
WHEN FRANKLIN SQUARE lights up next weekend with the 15,000-bulb Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival, the show's glowing dragons, pandas, lotus flowers, and pagodas will be the talk of the town. And 28-year-old Jessie Li will breathe a sigh of relief. Li is from Zigong, in Sichuan province, where the tradition of lantern festivals goes way back - to the Tang dynasty (A.D. 618–907) As a representative of the lantern-show company Sichaun Tianyu, she helped oversee the logistics of getting the big light show transported by container ship from China and assembled here.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Benjamin Powell
Politicians of both parties are prone to making economically illiterate promises and claims during campaign seasons. Donald Trump is turning this illiteracy into an art form. One of his latest insane promises is to force Apple to manufacture in the United States. In a recent speech at Liberty University, Trump boasted, "We're going to get Apple to build their damn computers in this country instead of other countries. " In these few words, Trump gets trade economics wrong and shows his ignorance of modern manufacturing.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITER
Temple University basketball games soon may attract a new audience - in China. Five international students from China will vie Sunday to become Temple's official broadcasters of men's games in Mandarin. The two winners will do live broadcasts and highlight reels for the team's six remaining home games, starting Thursday against Tulsa. Their broadcasts will be streamed on Owl Sports, the official website of the athletic department, and the highlight reels on YouTube and Youku - China's version of YouTube.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|