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NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 70 years ago, Mary Previte was liberated from a Japanese prison camp in China during World War II by a daring group of seven rescuers she called her heroes. Over the years, she managed to find them all, one by one, until there was only one name remaining on her must-find list. It took 18 years for Previte to locate the last man - Wang Cheng-Han, who was the Chinese interpreter for the liberation team. They were reunited last month when they spoke by telephone. She called the twist of fate a miracle - with a little help from the Internet and Wang's doting grandson, who connected Previte to cherished family-history stories told by his grandfather growing up in China.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Vladimir Isachenkov, Associated Press
MOSCOW - China's new president received a lavish welcome Friday as he made Moscow his first foreign destination, joining with Russian President Vladimir V. Putin in a pointed attempt to counter U.S. influence in Asia. Xi Jinping, who became president just last week, urged Russia to improve its foreign policy coordination to protect the two neighbors' joint security interests - comments that appeared to seek Russia's backing for his eagerness to reduce U.S. influence and challenge Japan over a set of disputed islands.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xiaoxing Xi, the former chairman of Temple University's physics department, pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges of illegally sharing sensitive U.S. technology with entities in China. Xi, who is free on $100,000 bail, was formally arraigned on four counts of wire fraud. A trial date was not set. Regarded as a leader in superconductor research, Xi, 47, is accused of plotting to exploit technology he purchased from a U.S. company for the benefit of Chinese entities, including its government.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Temple University said Friday that Xiaoxing Xi has been temporarily suspended as chair of Temple University's physics department, pending the outcome of federal charges that he schemed to provide sensitive U.S. defense technology to China. "The concern is this certainly will affect his ability to do administrative duties," Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai said. No decision has been made on whether he will be permitted to teach in the fall if the case has not been resolved, Dai said.
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The fates of the United States and China have become linked in ways no one could have imagined 30 years ago. The two countries' economies have become so intertwined that historian Niall Ferguson has coined the term Chimerica . We buy China's goods, and the Chinese funnel billions of dollars back to support our deficit. They are a fast-rising power whose cooperation we need. Yet Chinese and American images of each other are frequently negative or misconstrued, and such misunderstandings can endanger relations.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - Harvard-trained Lobsang Sangay, the Tibetan prime minister-in-exile, vowed to fight China's uncompromising approach toward Tibet during his swearing-in ceremony Monday, as he prepared to assume many of the political duties previously handled by the Dalai Lama. Speaking at the Tsuglakhang temple in Dharamsala, Sangay vowed to fight Beijing's "colonialism," and said his election sent "a clear message to the hard-liners in the Chinese government that Tibetan leadership is far from fizzling out. " After traditional offerings of tea and sweetened rice, Sangay, 43, took up his new post at exactly nine seconds after 9:09 a.m. Nine is considered an auspicious number associated with longevity among many Tibetans.
NEWS
June 8, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEIJING - A cacophony of piano music spills from the 14 lesson rooms at the Piano City music store as a big digital clock in a waiting area counts down the time on lessons. On this Sunday, more than 100 students will file in and out for music lessons, including 11-year-old Jesse Cheng. Her parents say families in China are keen to train their children in music, especially piano or violin, to give them an edge in life. "This may be helpful in the future," said Frank Cheng, who owns an information-technology company.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that New Year celebrations have concluded in China, Philadelphia Distilling is hoping the world's most populous country shifts its focus to gin. Particularly, the company's gin. A marketing push for Philadelphia Distilling's Bluecoat American Dry Gin begins this week in and around Shanghai, where 150,000 bottles shipped late last year await buyers. "If we only get 2 percent of a billion people, it's a pretty decent market," said Sandy Lipstein of Malvern, an investor in the Northeast Philadelphia craft distiller.
NEWS
March 10, 1987
The Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau deserves praise for enthusiastic preparations to make guests welcome during the bicentennial celebration of the Constitution, but it may have slipped in its latest report on the subject that begins: "When you hear that company's coming, you reach for the vacuum cleaner, the furniture polish, the newest china and your best smile. " Shouldn't that be oldest china? On a very special occasion you bring out the heirlooms.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1991 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The White House inched away yesterday from President Bush's unequivocal support of renewed trade breaks for China, suggesting that it might require China to curb human-rights abuses in exchange for the low tariffs. The unusual backpedaling came after Bush surprised aides Wednesday by telling reporters he wanted to continue most-favored-nation trading status for China - a highly controversial issue in Congress. Bush made his comments nearly three weeks before he was to make a formal decision on trade with China, and White House aides said he had not been presented with options on the matter.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The dispute over whether Cooper University Hospital should take over emergency medical services in Camden intensified Wednesday, as the CEO of one of the current providers suggested that the legislative process was resembling "communist China. " Cooper quickly shot back, pointing to data released by Camden County claiming that Virtua frequently does not meet industry standards for response times. At issue is a bill, introduced this month and expected to reach the Legislature for a vote Thursday, that would let Cooper take over paramedic and basic life services in the city.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Xiaoxing Xi, the former chairman of Temple University's physics department, pleaded not guilty Thursday to charges of illegally sharing sensitive U.S. technology with entities in China. Xi, who is free on $100,000 bail, was formally arraigned on four counts of wire fraud. A trial date was not set. Regarded as a leader in superconductor research, Xi, 47, is accused of plotting to exploit technology he purchased from a U.S. company for the benefit of Chinese entities, including its government.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 70 years ago, Mary Previte was liberated from a Japanese prison camp in China during World War II by a daring group of seven rescuers she called her heroes. Over the years, she managed to find them all, one by one, until there was only one name remaining on her must-find list. It took 18 years for Previte to locate the last man - Wang Cheng-Han, who was the Chinese interpreter for the liberation team. They were reunited last month when they spoke by telephone. She called the twist of fate a miracle - with a little help from the Internet and Wang's doting grandson, who connected Previte to cherished family-history stories told by his grandfather growing up in China.
SPORTS
May 25, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
So how good is Emmanuel Mudiay? NBA fans are scouring for game tapes and scouting reports for more information of this draft mystery man. The 6-foot-5, 205-pound point guard is projected as a top-five pick in the June 25 draft, and could go as high as third to the 76ers. But his ability has come into question based on his decision to play professionally this past season in China instead of honoring a commitment to play at Southern Methodist. The level of competition in the Chinese Basketball Association is considered questionable.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Susan Snyder, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
The chairman of Temple University's physics department lost his leadership post Friday, one day after federal authorities accused him of illegally sharing sensitive U.S. technology with entities in China. Xiaoxing Xi, a naturalized U.S. citizen, however, would remain on the faculty, officials said. The case against Xi, who was charged with four counts of wire fraud, left colleagues, researchers, and former students perplexed and wondering how the professor they knew as a leading luminary in the field of superconductor research had ended up the latest target in the government's efforts to stanch the theft of trade secrets by China and Chinese businesses.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Temple University said Friday that Xiaoxing Xi has been temporarily suspended as chair of Temple University's physics department, pending the outcome of federal charges that he schemed to provide sensitive U.S. defense technology to China. "The concern is this certainly will affect his ability to do administrative duties," Temple Provost Hai-Lung Dai said. No decision has been made on whether he will be permitted to teach in the fall if the case has not been resolved, Dai said.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
THE CHAIRMAN of Temple University's physics department, a world-renowned expert in a complex field that most people know nothing about, has been indicted for fraudulently obtaining key technology to help associates in his native People's Republic of China. Xiaoxing Xi, 47, of Penn Valley, is a whiz in the field of superconductivity, the ability of something to allow electricity to flow through it easily - especially at very low temperatures - which can boost the performance and efficiency of certain technology like MRI machines.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Genesis Healthcare Inc., a major nursing home and rehabilitation company based in Kennett Square, said it opened a post-hospital rehabiliation facility in China, its first venture outside the United States. "With 14.8 percent of the Chinese population over the age of 60 and 70 million people in need of rehabilitation services, there is significant market potential in China," George V. Hager Jr., Genesis's chief executive, said. The new Genesis facility, called a "Vitality Center," is in Zengcheng, which is in southern China, near Guangzhou.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that New Year celebrations have concluded in China, Philadelphia Distilling is hoping the world's most populous country shifts its focus to gin. Particularly, the company's gin. A marketing push for Philadelphia Distilling's Bluecoat American Dry Gin begins this week in and around Shanghai, where 150,000 bottles shipped late last year await buyers. "If we only get 2 percent of a billion people, it's a pretty decent market," said Sandy Lipstein of Malvern, an investor in the Northeast Philadelphia craft distiller.
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