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China Trade

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NEWS
May 23, 2000 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel 3d is in the race of his life, and the last thing he needs is this week's vote on normalizing trade relations with China. The freshman Democrat is running for reelection in a suburban Montgomery County district where Democrats are heavily outnumbered, and is facing a strong opponent in longtime Republican State Sen. Stewart Greenleaf. Raising the stakes is the larger political import of the race. A Hoeffel victory could help the Democrats regain control of the House.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a recent article in the Bulletin of the Historical Society of Montgomery County, two historians tell the tale of a local family that built its fortune through trade with China in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The writers, Florence Johnson Young and Barton B. Proger, based their work on documents about entrepreneur John Donnaldson and his descendants that were donated to the Historical Society. "For me it has been a 30-year labor of love doing the research," said Young, who is the curator of the society's museum collections.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Nearly 107,000 jobs were lost in Pennsylvania from 2001 through 2010 because of the growing U.S. trade deficit with China, the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute reported. The loss in New Jersey was about 79,000 jobs, and nationally it was 2.8 million, EPI said. "Since China entered the World Trade Organization in 2001, the extraordinary growth of U.S. trade with China has had a dramatic effect on U.S. workers and the domestic economy . . . The United Statesd is loosing export capacity, and the growing trade deficit with China has been a prime contributor to the crisis in U.S. manufacturing employment," the institute said.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as China's manufacturing sector slumped in August, its trade imbalance with the United States has cost this country 2.7 million jobs over 10 years, according to a study released Thursday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington think tank. By real numbers, Pennsylvania was one of the states most affected by the growing U.S. trade deficit, with 101,200 jobs lost - most in manufacturing - between 2001 and 2011. California, Texas, New York, Illinois, North Carolina, and Florida lost more.
NEWS
May 27, 1994
With its 1.2 billion souls, China could very shortly become the world's largest economy. Think about that a moment. Because it is the fact that explains why President Clinton chose the right course yesterday, extending favorable trading privileges to the Chinese, despite the government's imperfect progress on the human-rights front. No, China hasn't ended forced labor completely, nor has it begun treating political dissenters with kid gloves. But it has improved, as exemplified by its pledge to stop jamming news signals from the Voice of America.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Is China a trade pirate or one of America's "most favored nations" as a trade partner? To President Clinton, it is both. Yesterday, Clinton proposed to extend China's current MFN status as a trading partner. That keeps tariffs low on Chinese exports to the United States. Only last Wednesday, the Clinton administration threatened to slap punishing tariffs on $2 billion of Chinese goods on June 17 unless Beijing shuts down 31 factories that allegedly pirate U.S. computer software, musical compact discs, and other intellectual property.
FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
It was a little past 8 one morning last month when Michael Strange settled down at the laptop in his living room in Philadelphia's Brewerytown section, and got on the line to Beijing. His conference call would stretch into a Skype marathon - three hours and change. Strange is the fifth-generation owner of Bassetts Ice Cream, the Philadelphia stalwart (est. 1861), scooping from the first days of the Reading Terminal Market, and a wholesaler of those iconic, blue-and-white pints, America's oldest - if still distinctly regional - ice cream brand.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
There may yet be other weeks that better capture Bill Clinton's presidency, but it would be hard to top this one. His political strengths and failings have all been on display: his ability to win the big fight, his refusal to admit personal mistakes, his gift for bargaining with Congress, and his overwhelming dominance of the national political scene. Like his presidency, this week was a juggling act. With an eye toward his legacy, Clinton lobbied hard for the China trade bill while preparing for next week's high-level summit in Moscow.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Venting its resentment over last year's massacre of students in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, the House passed two bills yesterday that would severely limit - and perhaps halt - U.S. trade with China. In the Senate, Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D., Maine) is pushing an effort to cut off trade with China within 90 days unless it begins observing human-rights guarantees and moves toward democracy. If the trade measure that eventually is agreed to by both chambers is as stringent as the House bills, President Bush is virtually certain to veto it because China has supported U.S. action against Iraq.
LIVING
November 2, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
"I ate a fine meal at the Ritz from it last Sunday in London," said Capt. Michael Hatcher, referring to the Chinese porcelain that he, his partner Max de Rham and a team of divers brought up from the depths of the South China Sea in 1983. London's Ritz Hotel bought a service for 24 at the auction of Hatcher's porcelain in Amsterdam last spring, and the hotel now charges a premium when it uses the china for special dinners. Hatcher made his comment when he came to New York last month to promote the sale, at Bloomingdale's, of more china from the Nanking cargo.
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FOOD
March 22, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
It was a little past 8 one morning last month when Michael Strange settled down at the laptop in his living room in Philadelphia's Brewerytown section, and got on the line to Beijing. His conference call would stretch into a Skype marathon - three hours and change. Strange is the fifth-generation owner of Bassetts Ice Cream, the Philadelphia stalwart (est. 1861), scooping from the first days of the Reading Terminal Market, and a wholesaler of those iconic, blue-and-white pints, America's oldest - if still distinctly regional - ice cream brand.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
While our political leaders have been beating each other's brains out, so have China's. Communist Party leaders will name a seven- man ruling committee Thursday. Since China is our main world- power rival and top overseas trading partner - a growing focus for Cigna International , DuPont Co. , Dow Chemical, General Motors, Google, TE Connectivity , and other big U.S. companies; a big market for American coal, meat, and grain; and the place our smartphones are made by regimented workers whose low wages are finally rising - you'd think the results mattered to Americans.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | Howard Schneider, Washington Post
The United States and China filed dueling complaints at the World Trade Organization on Monday, sharpening what has become a steady trade skirmish even as the nations' leaders pledge to expand economic cooperation between the world's two largest economies. U.S. officials accuse China of giving hundreds of millions of dollars a year in subsidies to its auto parts makers in order to boost its own exports. "Export subsidies are prohibited under WTO rules because they are unfair and severely distort international trade," U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as China's manufacturing sector slumped in August, its trade imbalance with the United States has cost this country 2.7 million jobs over 10 years, according to a study released Thursday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington think tank. By real numbers, Pennsylvania was one of the states most affected by the growing U.S. trade deficit, with 101,200 jobs lost - most in manufacturing - between 2001 and 2011. California, Texas, New York, Illinois, North Carolina, and Florida lost more.
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Nearly 107,000 jobs were lost in Pennsylvania from 2001 through 2010 because of the growing U.S. trade deficit with China, the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute reported. The loss in New Jersey was about 79,000 jobs, and nationally it was 2.8 million, EPI said. "Since China entered the World Trade Organization in 2001, the extraordinary growth of U.S. trade with China has had a dramatic effect on U.S. workers and the domestic economy . . . The United Statesd is loosing export capacity, and the growing trade deficit with China has been a prime contributor to the crisis in U.S. manufacturing employment," the institute said.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN BUREAU
Russian President Vladimir Putin tantalized energy-thirsty China yesterday with revived hopes for a pipeline to deliver crude oil, but he also warned that China should start buying more of Russia's manufactured products. The $11.5 billion pipeline project from eastern Siberia to the Pacific Ocean, with a spur to the Daqing oil center in northeast China, has been on the drawing board for years. Russian officials have been dragging their feet, wary of China's growing economic strength.
NEWS
March 13, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Two area auction houses will have major spring sales next weekend, one concentrating on English and Continental items, the other on Americana. The English and Continental items will be offered by Freeman's March 20 and 21 at its gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. More than 920 lots will be offered, including furniture, silver, prints and snuff bottles at the first session, and carpets and decorative arts at the second. English and Continental items have become a staple of Freeman's sales over the last few years, thanks in part to its affiliation with Lyon & Turnbull of Scotland, although such items are not yet the second string to its bow. "It's more of a third string, after Pennsylvania impressionist paintings and Americana," Freeman's vice president David Donaldson said.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a recent article in the Bulletin of the Historical Society of Montgomery County, two historians tell the tale of a local family that built its fortune through trade with China in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The writers, Florence Johnson Young and Barton B. Proger, based their work on documents about entrepreneur John Donnaldson and his descendants that were donated to the Historical Society. "For me it has been a 30-year labor of love doing the research," said Young, who is the curator of the society's museum collections.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Senate yesterday overwhelmingly endorsed a free-trade agreement with China, opening a new era of post-Cold War globalization that raises high expectations and serious concerns about the effect that such unfettered commerce would have on the bustling U.S. economy. The Senate voted 83-15 in favor of the free-trade pact that President Clinton negotiated last year with Beijing, adding its endorsement to that of the House of Representatives, which passed an identical measure in May. All six Philadelphia-area senators voted for the pact except Arlen Specter (R., Pa.)
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a crucial vote that virtually assures China the same trade status as the United States' longest and closest allies, the Senate yesterday rejected a list of conditions that could have killed the historic pact for the year. The vote removed the final obstacle to the agreement Clinton reached with Beijing last year and reaffirmed the strength of the bipartisan coalition that has worked with Clinton on behalf of the deal. Final Senate approval of the pact, which would put China on par with America's other preferred trading partners for the first time, is expected in the next few days.
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