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Chinatown

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NEWS
February 7, 1987
Chinatown is a major tourist attraction. Its wonderful restaurants attract out-of-towners and suburbanites into the heart of Center City Philadelphia. Why, then, do we seem to be doing everything possible to hem it in and make it less convenient? Bad enough the Vine Street Expressway is slicing through the neighborhood, the convention center (if it ever materializes) will be lapping at its shores, and proposed skyscrapers are threatening to overwhelm it - but now, the city has approved relocation of the bus terminal to Chinatown's border.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | STEVEN M. FALK/DAILY NEWS
Thoroughly fascinated children watch the Mid-Autumn Festival in Chinatown last night. The festival was the brainchild of a group of teens who wanted to recreate the Chinese holiday tradition for the elderly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | By Bing Mark, Special to The Inquirer
I could hear the dragon coming from far away. My tiny heart was beating loudly and quickly. As the dragon marched up the street, it seemed to cast a spell on everyone, gathering both adults and little children around it as it cavorted and bullied. I could see the large, menacing smile, the teeth that seemed bigger than my arm. Everything was loud; my ears hurt from the sound of firecrackers. Slightly older Chinatown boys had the courage to run just ahead of the dragon and light firecrackers - one landed nearby and startled me. It was bitter cold, my eyes were watery; I wiped the tears off my cheeks and covered my ears.
FOOD
July 21, 2016
Since our last guide to Chinatown in early 2014, more attention than ever has been paid to restaurant health inspections across Philadelphia – sparked in large part by a banquet that sickened more than 100 lawyers at Joy Tsin Lau in early 2015. With the city Health Department gaining more power to enforce recommended closures, and the Inquirer's Sam Wood noting the worst offenders in his regular "Clean Plates" column (which includes a database to search recent reports), a number of notable Chinatown spots have been forced into closing temporarily.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
SOME GROUP that claims to speak for everyone from Chinatown is protesting casinos because they fear addiction to gambling. Are they saying people in Chinatown must be protected from themselves because they aren't strong enough to take responsibility for their own actions? If this is so, shouldn't they be protesting the stores that sell blunts and 40s of malt beverages in Chinatown? And don't forget all the shops that sell unhealthy Chinese food with all that pork and sauces and MSG. If you want to protest, be inclusive of all unhealthy activities.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
To demonstrate that Chinatown cuisine is safe as well as delectable, City Council has decided to dine there next week. Councilman Lucien E. Blackwell announced yesterday that Council members would buy their own lunches Thursday at a Chinatown restaurant to try to counter "bad publicity" resulting from a recent federal food-contamination probe. "We have had a long and glorious history of the Chinese people providing food for the citizens of this city," Blackwell said yesterday.
NEWS
February 4, 1986
On Thursday, if they hold to plan, City Council members will lunch en masse in Philadelphia's beleaguered Chinatown. Chinatown is suffering because last month federal inspectors shut down a local food warehouse because of grossly unsanitary conditions. The warehouse reportedly supplied a few of the restaurants in Chinatown. There's nothing like a drumbeat of publicity about rodent and insect infestations at a food warehouse to make folks lose their appetite. And, though there have been repeated official assurances that, yes, it's safe to venture back to Chinatown, business at the eateries there is still in a slump.
NEWS
October 6, 2008
THE casino now planned for the Gallery will poison Chinese minds and rob their souls. As a Chinatown resident, I know that, while most people are debating the economic and environmental issues of Foxwoods moving to Center City, I would like to point out some less visible matters that may affect the people living and working nearby in Chinatown. Imagine 50 buses and 20,000 gamblers coming off I-95's Callowhill exit going through Chinatown on 10th Street every day. Imagine drunken gamblers who lost money staggering out of the casino at 2 in the morning looking for a public toilet.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
An arrest warrant has been issued for a 24-year-old man on charges of groping a 23-year-old woman and a 12-year-old girl in Chinatown last week. After police released a surveillance video from one of the incidents, investigators received an anonymous phone tip Tuesday identifying Melvin Bulls as their wanted man. Police said Bulls last known addresses were on the 1300 block of Ridge Avenue, 1200 block of South Bonsall Street and 900 block of Hamilton Street. The groping incidents occurred in Chinatown at 4:55 p.m. and 6:25 p.m. Thursday when a man came up from behind the victims and touched their buttocks, police said.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Remember last fall when you stood in line for a half-hour to eat dinner at your favorite Chinatown restaurant? Well, you won't have that problem now. Chinatown's restaurateurs gathered yesterday at a news conference to plead with the public to resurrect the healthy business conditions that prevailed there until a scant 11 days ago. That's when deputy U.S. marshals padlocked the New Eastern Food Co. warehouse on Westmoreland Street near...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 22, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
Iron Man wants your attention: Chinatown is changing fast! In case you haven't yet noticed the wok-fired pace of new and suddenly stylish restaurants opening in the old neighborhood, the huge red "Hulkbuster" suit set behind glass at the entrance to Yamitsuki, Chinatown's sleek new ramen hall, should do the trick. "That's an actual costume we displayed because it attracts our client base, which is in their mid-20s," said partner and chef Alan Su. "Competition is driving the market now in Chinatown.
FOOD
July 22, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Chinatown has long been a destination for certain things: implausibly cheap fruits and vegetables, an endless supply of beckoning-cat statues, and banquets of spicy delicacies spinning on tabletop lazy susans. But, fortune cookies aside, it was not really where you'd go for dessert. In the last year or so, that's changed. At least eight new dessert spots have opened (or will soon) within the few blocks framed by Ninth and 11th Streets, Filbert to Vine, bringing whole genres of sweets you didn't know you were craving.
FOOD
July 21, 2016
Since our last guide to Chinatown in early 2014, more attention than ever has been paid to restaurant health inspections across Philadelphia – sparked in large part by a banquet that sickened more than 100 lawyers at Joy Tsin Lau in early 2015. With the city Health Department gaining more power to enforce recommended closures, and the Inquirer's Sam Wood noting the worst offenders in his regular "Clean Plates" column (which includes a database to search recent reports), a number of notable Chinatown spots have been forced into closing temporarily.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Best Western Hotels & Resorts will operate its second Philadelphia hotel in an Art Moderne building that previously served as a film-storage facility on the northern edge of Chinatown near 13th and Vine Streets. Ed Grose, executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association, said Wednesday that owners of the property at 1225 Vine St. told him of the plans. An existing Best Western operates at 255 Chestnut St. Zoning approvals were granted for a 120-room hotel at the Vine Street property in March 2015, according to city records.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AS THE hushed sounds of a choir singing Chinese folk songs drifted in from an adjacent space, Yao Huang sat on a hard chair, lifting and stamping his feet at a senior center in Chinatown. Julia Wood, an occupational therapist, sat facing her audience of about 12 elderly Asian Americans with Parkinson's disease. "We're going to be using seated exercises taken from Tai Chi and yoga," Wood said. An interpreter, David Lee, translated her English words into Cantonese. When prompted, Huang, 75, chanted "om" along with others in the Parkinson's support group that meets at the On Lok Senior Services Center, on 10th Street near Race.
FOOD
May 27, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of May 24, 2016: Craig LaBan: Last weekend I hosted a crawfish boil for my block for the first time in a few years. We flew in 100 pounds of fresh crawfish from Lafayette ( www.CajunGrocer.com is a fantastic, affordable, reliable source for next-day UPS deliveries), some real andouille, boiled links of porky boudin, and spice-crusted cracklins from my favorite Louisiana butcher shop (the Best Stop in Scott). I fired-up my old 60-quart boiling rig, dusted off my trusty golf driver (a secret weapon for stirring the pot; golfing, less so)
BUSINESS
May 21, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
Chinatown businessman Yong Quan Zheng, who operated construction and money services businesses, has been charged with dodging state and federal taxes by filing false documents and paying employees - some of them illegal immigrants - in cash. Zheng's attorney, Greg Pagano, could not be immediately reached for comment. The U.S. Attorney said that Zheng, 61, who owned Hong Fai General Contractors, later known as Yong General Contractors, hired employees and paid them in cash from October 2010 through June 30, 2012.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | Historical Society of Pennsylvania
With the recent 100th anniversary of the birth of preservationist Jane Jacobs, consider the history of one of the city's most iconic neighborhoods: Chinatown. Philadelphia is connected to one of the earliest instances of Sino-American relations. The 1784 journey of the ginseng-laden Empress of China to Canton (present-day Guangzhou) - the United States' first successful voyage to insular imperial China - was financed primarily by Philadelphian Robert Morris. The beginning of the city's Chinatown is often traced to the early 1870s, with the opening of Lee Fong's laundry on Race Street's 900 block.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Starting this weekend, thousands of LED lights and 28 colorful Chinese lantern displays - larger-than-life dragons, pandas, lotus flowers, and pagodas that are illuminated from within, and in some cases, automated - will set Franklin Square aglow as the Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival opens its seven-week engagement. The traveling light show, which originates in China and has touched down previously in a few other U.S. cities, is one of several red-letter events marking the 10th anniversary of the once-blighted park's rebirth as a thriving hub of city life.
FOOD
March 11, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of March 8, 2016.   Craig LaBan: I'm curious to hear updates from the Philly Chefs Conference at Drexel, for which Joy Manning wrote an excellent preview. A lot of big names this year, from Glenn Roberts (of Anson Mills) to pioneering food science author Harold McGee, not to mention Philly's own stars. Highlights? Reader: The conference was a great event for anybody that would like to open a restaurant. It gives you some great insight on what pitfalls to avoid when starting out. But I must say the best part were the lunch spreads: tacos from South Philly Barbacoa, burgers, ramen, I believe, from Kensington Quarters, and the wine, liquor, and beer tastings in the afternoon.
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