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Chinatown

NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
A teaching nun at Holy Redeemer School drops by the principal's office; grinning, she shows off a tiny paper aircraft taken from a youngster. This is not your standard sheet of notebook paper folded into an airplane. It's an ingenious miniature helicopter, complete with twin rotating propellers. Even the mild mischief at Holy Redeemer demonstrates the intellect and creativity that marks, perhaps, the brightest student body in the city. Here at 10th and Vine streets, 210 first- through eighth-grade students jam into a tiny five-classroom school built to house 100. Up to 50 kids in two grades squeeze into one room.
NEWS
November 24, 2008
SO, THE proposed downtown casino, complete with all the problems people scream about when it comes to gambling, is pretty much a done deal, and the Chinatown community is howling mad. Who do I think is most to blame? Chinatown. If the community had let the Phillies build their ballpark in the area, the worst we'd see on a regular basis would've been traffic snarls and a few unruly fans. Now, instead of a charming ballpark that would've energized Center City, not to mention pumping loads of cash into the stores, bars and restaurants surrounding it, we'll get a casino that won't do any of that, thanks mainly to the shortsightedness of the community that should've known the area would be a prime target for a gambling hall after they chased the Phillies back to South Philly.
FOOD
May 28, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
You know the story. You spend years looking for something and then find that it has been under your nose all the while. Case in point: Chinatown's venerable Imperial Inn. In my search for a good, all-around Chinese restaurant in this area, I had checked out at least a dozen newer places but had overlooked this one time after time. Some were good, many were not. A number have changed hands once or even twice over the years of my Chinatown meanderings. The Imperial has remained in place, however, and recently I was reminded why. The Imperial is a white-tablecloth restaurant with a relatively small menu that manages to offer an appealing range of Szechuan, Mandarin and Cantonese choices.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission unanimously approved a new charter school in Chinatown, setting off a long, loud and tear-stained celebration by more than 100 supporters who crowded a meeting hall yesterday. "We are so thrilled - speechless," said Neeta Patel, a leader of Asian Americans United, the school's sponsor. The commission's 4-0 vote at the school district office directed major public funding to a neighborhood that activists say has long been denied the parks, libraries, playgrounds and health clinics routinely built in other places.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council refuses to swallow the "bad rap" Chinatown restaurants have been getting lately. So, Council's 17 members decided yesterday to enlist their collective stomachs in a dramatic show of support for the city's Chinese eateries. Next Thursday, all Council members will visit Chinatown to eat lunch together to publicly dispel the lack of confidence in Chinatown restaurants that has swept the city since Jan. 13, when federal marshals padlocked a North Philadelphia warehouse that supplied Oriental food to some restaurants.
NEWS
September 26, 2012
An apartment building in Chinatown was evacuated Tuesday after pieces of the facade fell onto the sidewalk, a Red Cross spokesman said. About 22 people were told to leave the building at 12th and Race Streets around 8 p.m. after the problem was discovered, said spokesman Dave Schrader. No injuries were reported. The people were first relocated to the Convention Center. The landlord then put the residents up at a local hotel while repairs are done, Schrader said. - Robert Moran
NEWS
September 26, 2012
An apartment building in Chinatown was evacuated Tuesday after pieces of the facade fell onto the sidewalk, a Red Cross spokesman said. About 22 people were told to leave at building at 12th and Race Streets around 8 p.m. after the problem was discovered, said spokesman Dave Schrader. No injuries were reported. The people were first relocated to the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The landlord then put the residents up at a local hotel while repairs are being done, Schrader said.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
For almost 30 years Cecelia Moy Yep has watched as Chinatown was squeezed by development - the commuter tunnel, Vine Expressway, Convention Center, Gallery and part of Independence Mall. "It was clear to us that we were in a fight for our survival," said Moy Yep, executive director of the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp. But Chinatown is growing, with more than 4,000 Asian-Americans living and working in the enclave. New housing is a paramount concern. Yesterday, with help from a City Council committee, Chinatown won a development battle of its own that will clear the way for a move north of the Vine Expressway.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Fay Hong Li had had enough. For almost a decade, he and other Chinatown residents have been hearing from local government about plans to change their neighborhood's zoning, which allows anything from single-family houses to skyscrapers, but without results. Municipal officials have drafted ordinances, community groups have held meetings and, most recently, City Council has made sweeping but vague promises about protecting the residents from the convention center that has been proposed in their midst.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
They say disasters happen in threes, so maybe it's no coincidence that the creators of "Chinatown" envisioned it as the first installment of a trilogy about ecological concerns in Southern California. "Chinatown," fortunately, became something more than an issue movie - a contemporary movie classic. And it seemed for a time that everybody involved was satisfied with that achievement. In the end, however, they succumbed to the temptation to deface a perfectly good movie with a can of spray paint otherwise known as a sequel.
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