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Chinese New Year

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NEWS
February 17, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Vicki Valerio
The Philadelphia Senior Tai Chi Group marked the start of the Chinese New Year with a demonstration yesterday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
FOOD
February 17, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Here's a quick quiz. Fill in the blank: American eagle, Russian bear, Chinese - - - - - -. If you said dragon, treat yourself to a special Chinese New Year dinner at one of many locations in the Delaware Valley. Today is the start of a new year on the Chinese calendar - 4686, The Year of the Dragon. Chinese New Year is part of a 12-year cycle symbolized by a dozen different animals. It always falls on a different day because it coincides with the second new moon after the winter solstice.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to buy some longevity? How about some beauty, or maybe a bit of luck? Vendors hawked them Saturday in Chinatown in the form of pussy willow, gladiolus, and bamboo, respectively, at a flower market in preparation for Sunday's Lunar New Year. Asian American residents were readying their homes according to time-honored rituals, including buying the traditional flowers for themselves and friends. Other celebrations for the Chinese New Year, as it's known, have been around for a while - a midnight parade, lion dances, and a daytime festival.
FOOD
February 9, 1994 | By Karol V. Menzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
Arrival of the Chinese New Year means a time of family celebration, of glorious food, of good wishes and good deeds, of dragons, lions and oranges. And when it arrives tomorrow, it also will mean the beginning of 4692, the Year of the Dog. "New Year is the biggest Chinese holiday," says Nina Simonds, noted chef and cooking teacher, who has written books on Chinese food and cooking. "Really, it's the only holiday in China that people take off time to celebrate. For three days, they stop working and just celebrate.
FOOD
January 29, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret Kuo was raised in a culture where culinary arts were regarded on a level with music and literature, with recipes treasured as works of art. Her father was a senator from Manchuria who welcomed some of China's most prominent people into his home for banquets, especially to celebrate the new year. Even after World War II, when the Communists gained power and her family emigrated to Taiwan, Kuo says, the new year was greeted with elaborate meals at which elders and ancestors were honored.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some years come in with a bang. Others, like this one, come in with a roar. (They all come in with a bang, actually, if you've ever had the wits scared out of you on the firecracker-filled streets of Chinatown.) This is the Year of the Tiger, celebrated a few days early at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, which on Saturday will host its 17th annual celebration. There will be performances of music and dance in the galleries and auditoriums, including Jade River Dancers, making their debut at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2003 | By Weta S. Ray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't look for a dragon to wind its way through the narrow streets of Chinatown at this weekend's Chinese New Year parades. "It's too cold," said Shu Pui Cheung, owner of the Cheung's Hung Gar Kung Fu Academy, whose students usually perform the traditional lion and dragon dance for the parades. "There will be a unicorn and lion dance. But it's too cold for the dragon," said Shu Pui Cheung, who explained that while the monster dragon is plenty colorful, it is not warm for the young dancers underneath.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1986 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"The kitchen god is behind you," T.T. Chang says gently. "The kitchen god is on top of you. The kitchen god watches you all the time. " We are sitting in the dining room of the Chinese Cultural & Community Center, 125 N. 10th St., with three gourmet chefs from mainland China and Virginia Van, their interpreter. The kitchen god is in the kitchen, getting ready to go to heaven and make his report. It is the Chinese New Year, time for the kitchen god's annual journey. He will tell the king of heaven how the wife treats the husband, how the children behave.
FOOD
December 6, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
In honor of the Year of the Horse, Philadelphia's Chinese Cultural and Community Center will feature a series of Chinese New Year banquets, beginning Jan. 26, the first day of the Chinese New Year 4688, and continuing through April 30. A team of visiting chefs from the Da Du Hotel in Beijing will prepare the 10-course meals, an annual Chinese New Year observation at the Cultural Center, which will cost $23 Tuesdays through Thursdays, and $25...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Gallop down to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Saturday to celebrate the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Horse, as part of World Culture Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Festivities will include performances by dance troupe MeiMei, an East vs. West Chinese music demonstration, the Pennsylvania Chinese Dance Club, the cappella group PennYo, and more. A drop-in calligraphy class will be offered from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and a language class from 12:30 to 2. Arts and crafts will be featured, including Year of the Horse crafts, painting, and paper cutting.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Would you like to buy some longevity? How about some beauty, or maybe a bit of luck? Vendors hawked them Saturday in Chinatown in the form of pussy willow, gladiolus, and bamboo, respectively, at a flower market in preparation for Sunday's Lunar New Year. Asian American residents were readying their homes according to time-honored rituals, including buying the traditional flowers for themselves and friends. Other celebrations for the Chinese New Year, as it's known, have been around for a while - a midnight parade, lion dances, and a daytime festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2013
Film New this week: Oscar Nominated Animated Short Films 2013 (***1/2 out of four stars) Oscar Nominated Live-Action Short Films 2013 (***) A strong lineup of animated entries, including stop-motion, hand-drawn, and, in "Paperman," a winning combination of traditional and CG cartooning techniques. The live-action titles are a mixed, uneven bunch, almost all centering around tales of the very young or the very old. No MPAA rating (adult themes). - Steven Rea Music The Vaccines Of all the young dudes calling themselves "punks" lately, the Vaccines are the spikiest.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
BLACK HISTORY MONTH Unsung heroine Moonstone Art Center wraps up its commemoration of the life and accomplishments of antilynching crusader, suffragist, journalist and speaker Ida B. Wells with a discussion of the relationship between 19th-century lynching and modern-day capital punishment. Criminal defense attorney Michael Coard, Witness to Innocence activist Shujaa Graham and others to speak. Ethical Humanist Society of Philadelphia, 1906 S. Rittenhouse Square, 2 p.m. Sunday, free, 215-735-3456, moonstoneartscenter.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Enjoy hands-on science and engineering activities at Drexel University on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. during Philly Materials Science and Engineering Day. Learn about materials science, expressed in laymen's terms as "the study of stuff," and learn what everyday things we use are made of and how they work. The event is free and presented by the departments of Materials Science and Engineering at Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania.   Philly Materials Science and Engineering Day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Bossone Research Enterprise Center on Market Street between 31st and 32d. Event is free.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
ON THE EVE of the Chinese New Year, a time for many to celebrate with family, Jin Zheng instead mourned the death of her husband, a Chinese-takeout owner gunned down Friday at their Tacony store. Zheng, 25, sat solemnly yesterday at a corner of a large, rectangular table during a meeting at the Greater Philadelphia Chinese Restaurant Association in Chinatown while community leaders raised money for her family. As the second of her three daughters, Mina, 2 1/2, at times cried and at times smiled playfully, Zheng held her and fed her a snack from a plastic bag, which Zheng clutched tightly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2012
Friday-Saturday A bounce in their step Montreal's RUBBERBANDance Group, which blends hip-hop and ballet, will perform Friday and Saturday at the Annenberg Center. The group's 2011 work "Gravity of Center" will make its Philadelphia premiere as a part of the Dance Celebration Series. The piece is set against a backdrop inspired by such prevalent issues as global warming, the economic crisis, and the will to survive. Performances are 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday at 3680 Walnut St. Tickets: $20. Information: 215-898-3900, AnnenbergCenter.org.
FOOD
January 19, 2012
Chinese New Year, 4710, the Year of the Dragon, arrives Monday and will be greeted with dinner specials at many area restaurants, as well as celebrations in Philadelphia's Chinatown and on the Main Line. The following events are free: Chinatown Flower Market. Fresh flowers symbolize growth and rebirth, so a large-scale flower market is held in Hong Kong every year. This year for the first time, Philadelphia will hold its own flower market, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the 10th Street Plaza, at Vine Street.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who would think a dragon would arrive bearing flowers? But that's what's happening this month, when the city's Chinatown neighborhood holds its first flower market, embracing a colorful tradition to welcome the lunar new year. The market will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Jan. 21 and 22 at the 10th Street Plaza, the Vine Street space defined by two giant stone foo dogs, the sacred lionlike sentries that serve as the gateway to Chinatown. The Year of the Dragon arrives on Jan. 23. Officials with the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011 | By MICHELE KAYAL, For the Associated Press
WHAT TASTES like a pot sticker but looks like a million bucks? The dumplings served on the eve of Chinese New Year, of course. "The dumpling shape looks like the money of the old days," says Susur Lee, who will feature rabbit dumplings at his eponymous Toronto restaurant in honor of the incoming Year of the Rabbit. "We eat it very late at the family dinner, and it brings us good luck. " Food is an integral part of Chinese culture, with culinary knowledge considered essential for refined, educated people.
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