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Chinese School

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NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEIJING - Teachers at a new high school here, like teachers the world over, like to boast about all the colleges that have accepted their students. In the school's main lobby stands a 10-foot sign with the names of more than 50 universities. All are top-notch and high-profile - and not one is in China. Instead, the 190 students in this public school will head to colleges in the United States. Last year's seniors were accepted to such universities and colleges as Duke, Cornell, Virginia, and Northwestern, as well as Pennsylvania State, Drexel, Lehigh, Dickinson, and Swarthmore.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN Di PIAZZA
Rehearsing their "Spring Frolic" dance at the Carusi Middle School gym in Cherry Hill are members of the Jade River Dancers: (from left) Karen Lin, 15; Jean Chou, 13; Joanna Wong, 13; and Katherine Luh, 16. Performances and demonstrations by students at the Chinese School of South Jersey, held Sundays at Carusi, will be featured at a Chinese New Year celebration at Croft Farm on Wednesday.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wearing long, flowing satin costumes, Alice and Jenny Wang took deep breaths and tucked away the red and gold envelopes containing their "lucky money" before they stepped on stage to perform The Water Dance. Alice, 17, and Jenny, 16, felt there was no way they could get this dance wrong - they had choreographed it and practiced for weeks. But a wish for luck couldn't hurt. After all, they were dancing in front of 150 of their friends and family, members of the South Jersey Taiwanese Association of America during the organization's Christmas celebration Saturday.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ARLEN SPECTER appreciated Rick Appel for more than his skills as a prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office. Specter, Philadelphia D.A. from 1966 to 1974, once said that Rick brought the "milk of human kindness" to the office. "He considered him a real kind gentleman," said Rick's sister, Vivian M. Appel. "He brought a softening to the district attorney's image. " Specter, who went on to serve in the U.S. Senate, died in 2012. Rick was the kind of prosecutor, defense lawyer and teacher widely admired for his devotion to the profession, his teaching skills and an irrepressible sense of humor that could leaven the most dire of situations.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
"The Chinese will surpass us in education in 10 years. " That's the impression Waterford school Superintendent Richard Salimena had after his recent trip to China. Salimena and school board secretary Earl Vasallo spent two weeks last month studying the educational system in several cities in China as part of a program sponsored by the USA-China Teacher Education Consortium. While acknowledging the differences between American and Chinese cultures, Salimena said Americans could learn much from the Chinese, especially when it came to teaching elementary school students.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After buying the Waldorf-Astoria, the General Motors Building, and billions of dollars of U.S. Treasury bonds, the Chinese may be looking to invest in something completely different - a broke and struggling school system. The head of the Chester Upland School District announced Wednesday that he would travel to China to work out a deal in which an elite school would pour up to a billion dollars into the Delaware County district, which is in state receivership, and the communities it serves.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hot, humid and cramped Carusi Junior High School cafeteria was the last place 6 1/2-year-old Alex Chan wanted to be on a sunny Sunday summer afternoon. But there he was, with about 340 other Chinese American children from all over South Jersey and the Philadelphia area. The occasion was the graduation and awards ceremony for the Chinese School of South Jersey, founded 26 years ago to foster knowledge and understanding of Chinese language and culture. Alex seemed to see it as sort of a drag.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was created as a visual catalyst - to fly as a reminder of the ever- increasing need to prevent race, creed and national boundaries from separating people. The 18-foot banner, known as the Dymaxion-World Flag, flew yesterday to greet the thousands of visitors at the entrance to the Fifth Annual Southern New Jersey Ethnic Festival at Glassboro State College. Containing flags from the 160 members of the United Nations, the patchwork banner set the tone for the festival as children and adults, educators and government leaders, went to celebrate the diversity of cultures in South Jersey.
NEWS
January 29, 2006 | By Diana Mellitz FOR THE INQUIRER
Last year I embarked on an incredible journey to China to teach English in a Chinese school. I was able to experience the rich culture, people, language and history of a country that has always been of great beauty and interest to me. The educational program I participated in is the Council for International Education Exchange, and I couldn't pass up this opportunity to fulfill a dream to live in China. I was able to work and travel all over the country for five months. I left in January 2005 to teach at a school in Wuxi in Jiangsu Province, a city about 1 1/2 hours by train northwest of Shanghai.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Fame has been a double-edged sword for David D. Ho. The AIDS researcher, who was named Time magazine's 1996 Man of the Year, feels both flattered and pressured by the attention. "I know with certainty that a lot of people are looking over our shoulders as we do our experiments," said the 44-year-old father of three. "All of us would prefer to do things more peacefully, without being in the spotlight. " At the same time, "it is gratifying for our work to be recognized so prominently," he added.
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NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ARLEN SPECTER appreciated Rick Appel for more than his skills as a prosecutor in the District Attorney's Office. Specter, Philadelphia D.A. from 1966 to 1974, once said that Rick brought the "milk of human kindness" to the office. "He considered him a real kind gentleman," said Rick's sister, Vivian M. Appel. "He brought a softening to the district attorney's image. " Specter, who went on to serve in the U.S. Senate, died in 2012. Rick was the kind of prosecutor, defense lawyer and teacher widely admired for his devotion to the profession, his teaching skills and an irrepressible sense of humor that could leaven the most dire of situations.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After buying the Waldorf-Astoria, the General Motors Building, and billions of dollars of U.S. Treasury bonds, the Chinese may be looking to invest in something completely different - a broke and struggling school system. The head of the Chester Upland School District announced Wednesday that he would travel to China to work out a deal in which an elite school would pour up to a billion dollars into the Delaware County district, which is in state receivership, and the communities it serves.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEIJING - Teachers at a new high school here, like teachers the world over, like to boast about all the colleges that have accepted their students. In the school's main lobby stands a 10-foot sign with the names of more than 50 universities. All are top-notch and high-profile - and not one is in China. Instead, the 190 students in this public school will head to colleges in the United States. Last year's seniors were accepted to such universities and colleges as Duke, Cornell, Virginia, and Northwestern, as well as Pennsylvania State, Drexel, Lehigh, Dickinson, and Swarthmore.
FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By Huntly Collins, For The Inquirer
Tears streamed down my face as the bus carrying our family and a dozen other Americans, all adopting parents, pulled out of Nanchang, the capital of southern China's Jiangxi Province, on a cold and rainy morning in January 1995. The 6-month-old baby girl I held in my arms had rosy red cheeks and inquisitive eyes. She had been abandoned when she was days old, left outside an orphanage in Yingtan City, about 100 miles to the southeast. Pinned to her clothing was a note written in crude Mandarin on red paper, a sign of good luck in China.
NEWS
January 29, 2006 | By Diana Mellitz FOR THE INQUIRER
Last year I embarked on an incredible journey to China to teach English in a Chinese school. I was able to experience the rich culture, people, language and history of a country that has always been of great beauty and interest to me. The educational program I participated in is the Council for International Education Exchange, and I couldn't pass up this opportunity to fulfill a dream to live in China. I was able to work and travel all over the country for five months. I left in January 2005 to teach at a school in Wuxi in Jiangsu Province, a city about 1 1/2 hours by train northwest of Shanghai.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nobel Learning Communities Inc. has signed a strategic partnership agreement with the largest operator of private schools in China, the company said yesterday. "This is the first step toward Nobel's establishment of an international network of private schools," said A.J. "Jack" Clegg, chairman and CEO of the Media-based education company. Nobel signed the papers outlining the partnership with South Ocean Development Corp. in Beijing last week. Nobel operates 162 schools in 16 states with a total enrollment of more than 26,000 students.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Melissa King, the Chinese cultural camp she is attending this week is not so much about learning the Chinese culture as it is about ordering properly. The 10-year-old from Washington Township said she has been waiting to order by herself at a Chinese restaurant since she was really young. "My parents always ordered for me because I didn't know Chinese," Melissa said. "I hope this week will teach me to order by myself. " Language lessons are only part of South Jersey's first Chinese Cultural Camp, a week-long day camp at Voorhees Middle School designed to teach children such as Melissa about their heritage and identity.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN Di PIAZZA
Rehearsing their "Spring Frolic" dance at the Carusi Middle School gym in Cherry Hill are members of the Jade River Dancers: (from left) Karen Lin, 15; Jean Chou, 13; Joanna Wong, 13; and Katherine Luh, 16. Performances and demonstrations by students at the Chinese School of South Jersey, held Sundays at Carusi, will be featured at a Chinese New Year celebration at Croft Farm on Wednesday.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Fame has been a double-edged sword for David D. Ho. The AIDS researcher, who was named Time magazine's 1996 Man of the Year, feels both flattered and pressured by the attention. "I know with certainty that a lot of people are looking over our shoulders as we do our experiments," said the 44-year-old father of three. "All of us would prefer to do things more peacefully, without being in the spotlight. " At the same time, "it is gratifying for our work to be recognized so prominently," he added.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hot, humid and cramped Carusi Junior High School cafeteria was the last place 6 1/2-year-old Alex Chan wanted to be on a sunny Sunday summer afternoon. But there he was, with about 340 other Chinese American children from all over South Jersey and the Philadelphia area. The occasion was the graduation and awards ceremony for the Chinese School of South Jersey, founded 26 years ago to foster knowledge and understanding of Chinese language and culture. Alex seemed to see it as sort of a drag.
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