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Chinese Woman

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NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By WEN YING ZHANG
Before I came to America, most of my Chinese friends warned me, "America is child's heaven, young people's battle field and old people's grave. You are old. Maybe get sick and nobody have time to take care of you. No money to see doctor. So after visiting your son and daughter, come back, come back. " So, two years ago, with a worried heart I come to America. I am very old. I cannot speak English. I have no friends. I cannot drive. I can only stay at home all day long. Maybe I get sick.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A band of Asian robbers held a 78-year-old Chinese woman in her Upper Darby home Thursday evening and threatened her with a meat cleaver, police said. The home invasion closely resembled a rash of such crimes in late 1991 and early 1992 that terrorized Upper Darby's Asian community and were believed to involve Asian youth gangs, said Upper Darby Police Lt. Vincent Ficchi. The victim, who lives on the first block of Chatham Road, told police that she opened her door about 7 p.m. after seeing a man with a package outside her window and believed he was delivering something.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
By the time the heart-shaking Puerto Rican salsa band, Los Caballos De La Salsa, takes over the stage for a 9 p.m.-1 a.m. dance party tomorrow night, this year's greatly expanded Annual International House Spring Festival at 3701 Chestnut St. will have offered a full afternoon and evening of ethnic food, crafts, song, dance, fashion and talent. "Some people don't know that we exist," says International House Resident and Student Programs director Jan Newell, who planned the event with Folklife Center acting director Tom McCabe.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Gina Boubion, Daily News Staff Writer
Police have arrested the husband of a Chinese woman who was charged Tuesday with abducting her baby from a foster home. Kwang Ying Tiang, 62, of 62nd Street near Catharine in West Philadelphia, was arrested yesterday by detectives as he was coming out of a relative's laundromat on Lancaster Avenue near 39th Street, police said. Tiang was charged with kidnapping, interfering with the custody of a child and conspiracy. Police said Tiang would not reveal where his wife and child were.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Boccuti says that when people look at her, a young Chinese woman, they assume she might not speak English. It happens even on the campus of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she's a 19-year-old sophomore. "I'm treated as an immigrant," she said in an interview. Boccuti, of Lansdale, spent the first 17 months of her life in a Nanchang orphanage before being adopted by a white couple and raised in the Philadelphia suburbs. She is unique. And one among thousands.
NEWS
January 22, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
What better way to investigate the nature of identity than in a play - where people pretend to be other people, putting on makeup and costumes and fake accents? "I seem to like stories about a major deception," says David Henry Hwang, author of the Tony-winning M. Butterfly, which opens tomorrow at the Philadelphia Theatre Company's Suzanne Roberts Theatre. In a recent telephone interview, he noted the similarities between the 1988 play that made him famous and his newest work, Yellow Face, which opened last month at the Public Theatre in New York.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Bob Merrell, a semi-retired businessman, volunteered to do literacy tutoring, he had certain expectations. He thought he would spend his time helping a poorly educated adult or recent immigrant learn how to read and write English well enough to get a driver's license, or perhaps fill out an application for welfare. Instead, Merrell spends his time discussing American culture, health insurance and democracy with his student, Xiang-Dong Ma, a 42-year-old Chinese scientist whose specialty is biotechnology.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
It was going to be great. So we said as we sipped white wine and drank in the fabled Hong Kong skyline by night from Victoria Peak, the island colony's most famous mountaintop. As we watched the fog and mist swirl outside the circular Peak Tower Restaurant, we anticipated our cruise to mainland China on the SS Shanghai. The boat, which has been run by China for decades, looked like a gleaming white grande dame in the travel agent's brochure. Carolyn, my traveling companion, recalled a glowing travel article about the three-day journey.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | By Gina Boubion, Daily News Staff Writer
A Chinese mail-order bride was charged last night with abducting her daughter from a foster home for the second time in a year. Authorities fear she may have fled to California or China. Feng Ying Chen, 42, of 56th Street near Catharine in West Philadelphia, was charged with the July 13 abduction of 2-year-old Ying-Zhang despite a court order barring her from visiting her child, the district attorney's office said. The child's first foster mother and sources in the Department of Human Services and the DA's office paint a very different picture of the troubled woman than do Chen's lawyer and acquaintances.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The street was filled with an exotic mixture of people, Chinese and foreigners, some on bicycles, some in horse-drawn buggies and rickshaws. They wore long evening dresses and tuxedos. They passed stores, foreign banks and real estate companies with the names displayed in both English and Chinese. "Xiang Ya face cream will make you beautiful," promised a billboard that pictured a Chinese woman with curled hair. Suddenly, leaping into the midst of this throng, was a man who looked completely out of place here.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Boccuti says that when people look at her, a young Chinese woman, they assume she might not speak English. It happens even on the campus of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she's a 19-year-old sophomore. "I'm treated as an immigrant," she said in an interview. Boccuti, of Lansdale, spent the first 17 months of her life in a Nanchang orphanage before being adopted by a white couple and raised in the Philadelphia suburbs. She is unique. And one among thousands.
NEWS
January 22, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
What better way to investigate the nature of identity than in a play - where people pretend to be other people, putting on makeup and costumes and fake accents? "I seem to like stories about a major deception," says David Henry Hwang, author of the Tony-winning M. Butterfly, which opens tomorrow at the Philadelphia Theatre Company's Suzanne Roberts Theatre. In a recent telephone interview, he noted the similarities between the 1988 play that made him famous and his newest work, Yellow Face, which opened last month at the Public Theatre in New York.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sophia's yin and yang were out of whack. She had eaten something that disagreed with her. Trapped in a doctor's examining room and suffering a raging stomachache, 15-month-old Sophia Wang began to scream. And cry. And squirm. Despite Sophia's dance of despair, Cai-Ping Lin, with years of experience in one of China's busiest hospitals, was able to decipher the signs. Sophia's little fingers were dark red. Her tongue, visible each time she wailed, was turning rouge. Or, as Lin explained in the 5,000-year-old terminology of Chinese medicine, in which the human physiology is viewed as a delicate balance of opposites between the cool "yin" and the hot "yang," Sophia displayed "a little too much heat.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The street was filled with an exotic mixture of people, Chinese and foreigners, some on bicycles, some in horse-drawn buggies and rickshaws. They wore long evening dresses and tuxedos. They passed stores, foreign banks and real estate companies with the names displayed in both English and Chinese. "Xiang Ya face cream will make you beautiful," promised a billboard that pictured a Chinese woman with curled hair. Suddenly, leaping into the midst of this throng, was a man who looked completely out of place here.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A band of Asian robbers held a 78-year-old Chinese woman in her Upper Darby home Thursday evening and threatened her with a meat cleaver, police said. The home invasion closely resembled a rash of such crimes in late 1991 and early 1992 that terrorized Upper Darby's Asian community and were believed to involve Asian youth gangs, said Upper Darby Police Lt. Vincent Ficchi. The victim, who lives on the first block of Chatham Road, told police that she opened her door about 7 p.m. after seeing a man with a package outside her window and believed he was delivering something.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Bob Merrell, a semi-retired businessman, volunteered to do literacy tutoring, he had certain expectations. He thought he would spend his time helping a poorly educated adult or recent immigrant learn how to read and write English well enough to get a driver's license, or perhaps fill out an application for welfare. Instead, Merrell spends his time discussing American culture, health insurance and democracy with his student, Xiang-Dong Ma, a 42-year-old Chinese scientist whose specialty is biotechnology.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From The New Land to An American Tail, most immigrant sagas recount the rigors of steerage across the Atlantic, arrival in the United States and the arduous trek west to establish a new home on the frontier. The fresh adventure 1,000 Pieces of Gold is one of the million or so previously untold stories about American pioneers who came by way of the Orient. The film opens in drought-ridden 1880s China as a subsistence farmer sells his pretty daughter, Lalu (Rosalind Chao), for a bag of gold.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
It was going to be great. So we said as we sipped white wine and drank in the fabled Hong Kong skyline by night from Victoria Peak, the island colony's most famous mountaintop. As we watched the fog and mist swirl outside the circular Peak Tower Restaurant, we anticipated our cruise to mainland China on the SS Shanghai. The boat, which has been run by China for decades, looked like a gleaming white grande dame in the travel agent's brochure. Carolyn, my traveling companion, recalled a glowing travel article about the three-day journey.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By WEN YING ZHANG
Before I came to America, most of my Chinese friends warned me, "America is child's heaven, young people's battle field and old people's grave. You are old. Maybe get sick and nobody have time to take care of you. No money to see doctor. So after visiting your son and daughter, come back, come back. " So, two years ago, with a worried heart I come to America. I am very old. I cannot speak English. I have no friends. I cannot drive. I can only stay at home all day long. Maybe I get sick.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Gina Boubion, Daily News Staff Writer
Police have arrested the husband of a Chinese woman who was charged Tuesday with abducting her baby from a foster home. Kwang Ying Tiang, 62, of 62nd Street near Catharine in West Philadelphia, was arrested yesterday by detectives as he was coming out of a relative's laundromat on Lancaster Avenue near 39th Street, police said. Tiang was charged with kidnapping, interfering with the custody of a child and conspiracy. Police said Tiang would not reveal where his wife and child were.
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