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SPORTS
April 10, 2011
ATLANTA - Quite possibly the best pregame fan contest in baseball is held here at Turner Field. Normally once a homestand, three contestants and one Braves player participate in a closest-to-the-pin game. On Saturday, it was infielder Brooks Conrad's turn. They set up a small plot of turf in the on-deck circle and a flag in center field. Conrad took the high-iron club and hit the golf ball to within 15 feet of the pin. Usually the Braves player has the best shot. This time, two of the fan contestants couldn't even chip the ball out of the infield.
NEWS
October 22, 2007
RE REP. BOB BRADY'S Oct. 8 letter editor regarding the Children's Health Insurance Program, for which the veto override has failed. Contrary to Congressman Brady's repeated implications, President Bush does not want to end the program. In fact, the president has endorsed a $5 billion increase in the program. President Bush vetoed the bill because Democrats in Congress want to expand the program by $25 billion. President Bush is simply being fiscally responsible. Because most Americans practice personal responsibility and want limited government, Congressman Brady's politicalization of the issue will backfire on the Democratic Party.
NEWS
March 11, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
If you think it's possible to create a one-size-fits-all chip for your television set that will screen out all the stuff you don't want your kids (or your dog) to watch, you obviously haven't strolled the snacks aisle at your supermarket lately. Low-salt. High-garlic. Blue corn. White corn. Do we really think a nation that can't agree on a recipe for tortilla chips is going to agree on the specifications for a V-chip? Here are just a few of the options we expect to see the next time we go shopping for a TV set: THE MOUNT AIRY LIBERAL CHIP How to serve it: Baked, not fried.
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf announced Thursday a series of small benefit upgrades for families with coverage though the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), effective Dec. 1. Changes include removal of limits on inpatient and outpatient stays for mental-health and substance-abuse treatment, and the end of outpatient co-payments for mental-health services. Vision care was broadened to cover more types of prescription lenses and tinting. CHIP has long been considered excellent insurance, and many of the changes will apply to small portions of the 148,000 children in the program.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
With the enthusiasm of a pep rally, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Sen. Bob Casey, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, and other officials on Monday urged students at Furness High School in South Philadelphia to help spread the word about Pennsylvania's Children's Health Insurance Program. "I am asking you to be the messengers," Sebelius told about 400 students in the auditorium. As of last month, 28,261 children in Philadelphia were enrolled in CHIP, which provides health coverage to children and teenagers not eligible for government medical assistance.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1997 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Four House Democrats complained yesterday of potential national security problems in a federal deal to transfer next-generation computer chip-making technology to a consortium led by Intel Corp. The agreement, announced last month between the Department of Energy and Intel, gave the group the rights to a chip-manufacturing technique called extreme ultraviolet lithography, developed in government labs for defense use. The lawmakers expressed concern that such Japanese firms as Nikon would derive much of the benefit.
SPORTS
August 21, 1990 | By Mayer Brandschain, Special to The Inquirer
Wild Quail Country Club pro Joe Wollaston partnered with amateurs Bill Schaefer, John Kitchen, Wallace Collins and John Whitby for a first-place finish in the Philadelphia Section PGA Oldsmobile Scramble qualifying tournament yesterday at the Oak Terrace Country Club. They finished in a tie with two other teams at 12-under-par 59 and won a chip-off. Wollaston earned $1,300 from the $40,000 purse, and he and his partners qualified to play for the National Gross Championship Oct. 12-15 at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. Wilmington Country Club pro Chris Wagner also earned $1,300 when he and his partners finished first low net at 54; they earned the right to play for the National Net Championship at Disney World, Sept.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
What began as a Deptford woman's "why not?" entry to a national potato chip contest has proved to be a moment of record in the annals of American snack history. Meneko Spigner McBeth's Kettle Cooked Wasabi Ginger chip proposal also has brought her national attention, $1 million, and possibly a new Audi. And there's the five-pound weight gain she jokes about. McBeth, 35, a Temple University Hospital medical-surgical nurse, was named the winner of the Frito-Lay "Do Us a Flavor" contest during a dinner in New York City on Monday evening.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Staff Writer
Thomas Dickson III, 65, of Haddonfield, who loved and coached Haddonfield soccer, died Sunday, Feb. 28, from Lou Gehrig's disease. After coaching his children in a variety of youth sports, Mr. Dickson, known as "Chip," became freshman soccer coach at Haddonfield Memorial High School in 2002. Even after he was diagnosed with ALS, he continued as a varsity assistant, eventually showing up in a wheelchair for practices and games. By that point, the lessons he taught were off the field as well as on. "I can't imagine going through what he had to go through with more grace," said Haddonfield varsity soccer coach Ryan Nixon.
SPORTS
June 8, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
EVERYBODY KNOWS that Chase Daniel is a Doug Pederson "guy," brought in and given a three-year, $21 million contract despite an anorexic NFL playing resume because of his backwards-and-forwards knowledge of Pederson's offense and his ability to help teach it to others. Leodis McKelvin, Nigel Bradham and Ron Brooks all are in Philadelphia because they are Jim Schwartz "guys," brought in by the new defensive coordinator and expected to play important roles in his defense. Sports are not unlike politics in that, when there is a regime change, there usually is significant turnover.
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SPORTS
September 16, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Regardless of what happened last year, the Penn State party line for the game Saturday against Temple doesn't vary from what James Franklin and his players usually say about any opponent - basically, it's our most important game because it's our next game. But the Owls' 27-10 thrashing of the Nittany Lions last year at Lincoln Financial Field, their first victory in the series since 1941, has not been completely forgotten by Penn State's players. "It's going to be the type of game where, methodically through the week, we're going to practice with a chip on our shoulder so that what happened last year will not happen again this year," offensive tackle Andrew Nelson said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 12, 2016 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
When the Eagles announced the trade of cornerback Eric Rowe last week, coach Doug Pederson said the team wanted to give Rowe a chance to play. The obvious implication was that it sure wouldn't happen here for the converted safety taken in the second round of the draft two years ago. Pederson was a little nicer about it, but what he said wasn't much different from what Buddy Ryan said when bidding farewell to a player. "We're going to let him get on with his life's work," the coach would say, an indication Ryan didn't necessarily think that included the game of professional football.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
As Brandon Graham walked from the visitors' locker room to the bus following the third preseason game at Indianapolis a few weeks back, Graham wanted to make a point about the Eagles' embrace of defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz's system. "This defense is built for us. The people that's here, the personnel, and that's good . . . You don't have to have a down year to get the personnel here," Graham said. "For us, we've just been licking our chops and happy to be back into this type of defense.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
WHEN Matt Albasi snagged credentials to the Democratic National Convention, he immediately saw something suspicious on the back of his Secret Service-issued pass. Albasi, publisher of Spirit News, a local paper based in Fishtown, noticed a slightly raised square indicating something inside the hard plastic. "I went full-on paranoid mode: 'It's gotta be a GPS or a microphone,' " Albasi said. Once he had used scissors to cut the pass open , Albasi found a small silver radio frequency identification - RFID - chip inside.
SPORTS
July 29, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
BY ALL ACCOUNTS, including his own, Jason Peters did not play very well last season. The $9.7 million question, which is the amount of Eagles salary-cap space he'll be occupying this season, is why. Did age finally catch up with the 34-year-old eight-time Pro Bowler? Was it the seasonlong battle with back and quad injuries? Or was he yet another victim of Chip Kelly's up-tempo offense? I haven't made a secret of the fact the last several months that I favor the Father Time explanation, with the injuries being one of the casualties of his advanced age. Not surprisingly, Peters disagrees with me. Speaking to reporters for the first time since last season following Thursday's first full-squad training camp workout, he blamed most of his struggles last season on Kelly's infatuation with tempo.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
A QUICK story about Chip Kelly: Late last season, his dream team discombobulating in front of his very eyes, Kelly stepped to the outside podium for his midweek media availability. A colleague asked if I could place his recorder on the podium, where I was taking mine. But it slipped from my hands as I took it, and the batteries exploded from the machine as it hit the ground a few yards way. I scurried, red-faced, to collect it. Going back to Oregon and New Hampshire before that, Kelly is well known for planning his practice time down to the minute.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Utz Quality Foods Inc., the family-owned Hanover, Pa.-based potato-chip and snack-food company that's been growing like a well-fed teenager, has agreed to pay about $135 million, or $12 a share, for Golden Enterprises Inc., the publicly traded Birmingham, Ala.-based maker of Golden Flake chips and other snack products. That's a premium to Golden's recent trading price of about $7. "This is an excellent transaction for our stockholders, our customers, and our employees," Golden chief executive Mark McCutcheon said in a statement.
FOOD
July 15, 2016
Supermarket snack aisles have lately become crowded with potato chips and other snacks inspired by that mixture of fried potatoes and seasonings that only Chickie's & Pete's can legally shill as "Crabfries. " We put three of these palate-decimating potato chip products to the test, and enlisted Inquirer restaurant critic Craig LaBan for tasting notes: Herr's Chickie's & Pete's Famous Crabfries Seasoned Potato Chips It's a ridged chip with that familiar spicy-salty seasoning, plus a powdered dairy coating to call to mind the cheesy dipping sauce that accompanies Crabfries.
SPORTS
June 8, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
EVERYBODY KNOWS that Chase Daniel is a Doug Pederson "guy," brought in and given a three-year, $21 million contract despite an anorexic NFL playing resume because of his backwards-and-forwards knowledge of Pederson's offense and his ability to help teach it to others. Leodis McKelvin, Nigel Bradham and Ron Brooks all are in Philadelphia because they are Jim Schwartz "guys," brought in by the new defensive coordinator and expected to play important roles in his defense. Sports are not unlike politics in that, when there is a regime change, there usually is significant turnover.
SPORTS
June 2, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
NELSON AGHOLOR won't make excuses, so we'll make them for him. It wasn't easy to be a wide receiver in Chip Kelly's offense. It wasn't easy to be anything, really. No player has said that explicitly, but the space between their lines keeps getting easier to read the further out we get from the old ball coach's departure. Take Agholor, for instance. On Tuesday afternoon, the 23-year-old wideout deflected a number of questions that asked him to compare Doug Pederson's West Coast offense with Kelly's manic spread scheme.
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