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Chlorine

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NEWS
June 20, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
More than 20,000 people returned home yesterday after a two-day evacuation of neighborhoods choked by toxic fumes from a chemical plant fire that sent 275 people to the hospital. But 4,600 residents were barred from returning to their neighborhood near the smoldering factory that continued to flare up and spew deadly yellow-green gas. The plant makes chloride pellets for swimming pools. The fire began Friday when rain blew in a window of the Advanced Laboratories factory, reacting with chlorine pellets manufacturered for swimming pools, authorities said.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Chlorine is beginning to cause more environmental problems than it cures. But alternatives to the popular disinfectant may lead to higher rates for customers of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA), which is facing a 1994 deadline to switch to another way to treat its waste water. "The message is to use something other than chlorine," said Jack Robertson of Uwchlan Township, DARA chairman. "I'm sure every alternative is more expensive than chlorination. " Robertson has called a special meeting of the five municipalities that make up DARA to discuss the question - plus a sludge dewatering project and concerns raised by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency about enforcement authority at DARA.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | By Anika M. Scott, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chlorine, the chemical disinfectant used in everything from drinking water to hot tubs to dolphin pens, has had a near-monopoly on sanitizing swimming pools in most places. But at least three area pools - the Rose Tree Woods Swim Club in Broomall, the Aronimink Golf Club in Newtown Square, and one indoor pool at the Upper Main Line YMCA in Berwyn - have replaced their chemical filter systems with systems that use up to 95 percent less chlorine. The process - rarely used in Pennsylvania but more common in the West - is called ionization.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A spill of three gallons of liquid chlorine forced the closing of Lower Merion High School and the administration building yesterday morning. The accident occurred in the pool-filter room beneath the gymnasium during routine maintenance by a custodian, district spokesman Doug Young said. "He moved the chlorine, and it spilled," Young said. The worker, whom Young declined to identify, apparently was not injured but was taken to Lankenau Hospital "to be checked out. " Fumes from liquid chlorine produce a pungent odor that can burn eyes and nasal passages and irritate lungs.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writers
Nearly 40 people were evacuated from a block in the city's Northern Liberties section yesterday morning after odorous fumes leaked from a trash truck carrying large containers of discarded chlorine powder. Residents were permitted back into the area within two hours of the incident, which took place at 9 a.m. in the 300 block of Fairmount Avenue. Four people complained of sickness, but no one was harmed, officials said. The trash truck was from the city's Department of Recreation.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
An estimated eight people were hospitalized Saturday after a chlorination pump failure at Green Fields Swim Club in West Deptford caused chlorine vapors to be discharged into the air at the facility, said manager Dean Cooney. One of the club's three outdoor pools was shut for the rest of the day after the incident, which was reported to Gloucester County emergency dispatchers about 3:15 p.m. Four ambulances were sent to the scene on what was one of the hottest days of the year. - Maria Panaritis
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | BY RAMONA SMITH, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Ray Forestal says the longest moment of his life was spent running in deep snow, still feeling the heat from a flaming tank car of phosphorus. Forestal, the fire marshal in Falls Township, Bucks County, had just helped move a rail car of potentially deadly chlorine away from the fire. Now he was running to jump aboard a locomotive that was slowly pulling away from the cars in Conrail's Morrisville yard. "I was afraid. I'm not kidding you, I've never been that afraid in my life," Forestal recalled.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For the bacteria in the Delaware River at Philadelphia, those months without chlorine were a banner season. Just a short period of releasing partially treated sewage into the river two years ago was enough to convince scientists that the waste still needs chlorine disinfection year-round. The Delaware River Basin Commission had hoped, in a just-completed study, to find that sewage plants could safely stop using chlorine in the colder months - thus saving money and keeping some toxic chemicals out of the river.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Stop bleaching your kids," admonishes a flier circulated recently on the Main Line. "Doesn't your family deserve to swim in a chlorine-free pool?" Using those and similar sales lures, manufacturers of ion generators, an alternative to chlorine disinfectant, are pitching hard for customers throughout the region as the season for backyard swimming makes its annual splash. Billed as an odor-free substitute for harsh additives, ionization equipment purifies a pool by passing a weak electric current through copper and silver electrodes installed in the filtration system.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An overturned tank trailer loaded with chlorine prompted the evacuation early yesterday of several hundred overnight workers from industries in the Penn Warner Industrial Park, next to where the tanker overturned, spilling about 500 gallons. Minutes into the evacuation, as workers were being ordered to leave Heucotech Ltd. on Newbold Road, word came that the tanker contained adiluted form of the chemical. Further evacuations were called off. Falls Township Fire Marshal Ray Forestal said the mishap occurred at 2:24 a.m. on Newbold Road, shortly after the truck left the Wonder Chemical Co. on Canal Road.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
Michael Phelps does it. So does Ryan Lochte. But please think twice before you, ahem, go in the water. It may be convenient. But peeing in a pool also triggers chemical reactions that can be hazardous to your health. Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in modern history, was asked in 2012 if he urinates in the water. "I think everybody pees in the pool," Phelps told the Wall Street Journal . "It's kind of a normal thing to do for swimmers. We don't really get out to pee. We just go whenever we are on the wall.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Routinely, the Philadelphia Water Department tests its product for 100 "regulatory parameters" - things that might not be so good for us. The main lab alone analyzes 2,400 water samples a month. But at least once a shift, a chemist will walk over to a spigot, fill a glass and . . . take a whiff. It's the ultimate reality check: Is this stuff that courses through 3,100 miles of pipes, 250 million gallons a day, OK to drink? The short answer, from an annual report that public water suppliers must give to customers, is: Yes. But it also shows what Philadelphia and other water providers are up against.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
An estimated eight people were hospitalized Saturday after a chlorination pump failure at Green Fields Swim Club in West Deptford caused chlorine vapors to be discharged into the air at the facility, said manager Dean Cooney. One of the club's three outdoor pools was shut for the rest of the day after the incident, which was reported to Gloucester County emergency dispatchers about 3:15 p.m. Four ambulances were sent to the scene on what was one of the hottest days of the year. - Maria Panaritis
NEWS
December 8, 2007 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania environmental officials are investigating whether this week's fish kill in Skippack Creek was caused by the same Montgomery County meat-processing and rendering plant blamed for three others in the last two years. As many as 3,000 fish, mostly minnows but also white sucker and bass, along with frogs and bullfrog tadpoles, worms and leeches, were found dead late Wednesday afternoon in a mile-long portion of the creek just below the Moyer Packing Co. (MOPAC) in Franconia Township.
NEWS
June 18, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a gorgeous day for racing on the Schuylkill yesterday, with the sun shining and water sparkling - and it was all the more exhilarating after a health advisory that nearly threatened to keep rowers on dry land. The 78 races in the Schuylkill Navy Regatta were going "superbly," Clete Graham, commodore of the Schuylkill Navy, said as he sat on the awards grandstand by the Columbia Bridge. "There were no qualms, no hesitations. It was a beautiful day. " About 600 athletes from 42 clubs came out. They were thrilled to compete, and didn't see any signs of a Montgomery County fish kill, Graham said.
NEWS
January 27, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water is flowing again through fountains and sinks at Linden Elementary School in Doylestown after followup testing yesterday showed no signs of the E. coli bacteria. Routine water tests earlier this week came back positive for E. coli. But the tests also showed a desirable level of residual chlorine, which should have killed off the bacteria. That led borough and county health officials to question the test. Students and staff at Linden Elementary began drinking bottled water and washing with hand sanitzer after Principal Alan J. Bernabei got the test results Tuesday morning.
NEWS
January 26, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick and Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials expect to know for sure this morning whether E. coli bacteria are in the water supply of Linden Elementary School in Doylestown. Routine water tests detected the bacteria on Tuesday morning, and since then, students and staff have been drinking bottled water and washing their hands with sanitizer. No illness has been reported. Officials said they think the problem is with the test, not the water. Results from a second test are expected at 7:30 a.m. today. While the test that came back Tuesday showed the presence of Escherichia coli, or coliform, it also showed good levels of chlorine.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A spill of three gallons of liquid chlorine forced the closing of Lower Merion High School and the administration building yesterday morning. The accident occurred in the pool-filter room beneath the gymnasium during routine maintenance by a custodian, district spokesman Doug Young said. "He moved the chlorine, and it spilled," Young said. The worker, whom Young declined to identify, apparently was not injured but was taken to Lankenau Hospital "to be checked out. " Fumes from liquid chlorine produce a pungent odor that can burn eyes and nasal passages and irritate lungs.
NEWS
September 8, 2004 | By John G. Culhane
For swimmers and enthusiasts of the sport, Olympic years are great. Two weeks after the swimming competition ended, I'm still recovering from a combination of creakiness (from sitting in my TV room for more than a week of evenings) and hoarseness (from yelling encouragement to swimmers who certainly could not hear me). It was inspiring. When I excised myself from the couch, I went to work out at Kelly Pool, Philadelphia's own Olympic-size (50-meter) outdoor facility. The pool is in a beautiful setting, just a few yards from Memorial Hall (future home of the Please Touch Museum)
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A series of catastrophic fires, industrial accidents and building collapses has triggered public clamor for China's leaders to address an appalling public-safety record. Recent deadly tragedies include two massive fires, a poisonous chlorine leak, the collapse of a bridge, and a devastating gas-well blowout. By one estimate, an average of 300 Chinese lose their lives every day in industrial accidents, mine collapses, and other disasters. China tallied a quarter of a million fires last year alone.
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