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Chocolate Milk

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NEWS
February 14, 2014
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, my mother came over this weekend and brought a bottle of "chocolate wine. " That sounded weird enough, but then she poured a glass and it looked like Yoo-hoo. Yuck! Who thinks up this stuff? Marnie: That was probably ChocoVine, Buzz. It's made with red wine, chocolate and cream, and tastes like a lighter, less boozy spin on Bailey's Irish Cream. I find it hard to discern the taste of red wine, personally, but there's no question that that stuff is hyper-popular these days.
FOOD
September 17, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Jonathan Lipnicki, who played little Ray in the movie "Jerry Maguire," has been recruited for a National Milk Promotion Board "mustache ad" - but his "mustache" is a little different from those seen on such celebrities as Spike Lee and Larry King. His has chocolate in it. The message in this ad is that chocolate milk is good for little kids. Not all moms believe this. In fact, the Milk Promotion Board, which is supported by U.S. companies that pasteurize, homogenize and package milk, admits that many mothers feel guilty adding chocolate syrup to milk.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Sandra Stevens, Special to The Inquirer
Chocolate milk, banned for nine months in Pemberton Township schools last year, is more popular now with elementary school students than before it was deleted from the menus, according to school district officials. The school board banned chocolate milk from kindergarten through sixth grade in May 1988. "I sell seven chocolate milks to one regular," said Gertrude Harbin, head cook for Stackhouse School. Sixth graders at the elementary school said during their lunch hour Friday that they were upset when the chocolate milk was taken away.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | By Suzanne Schneider Ross, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some guys have tough jobs. Take John Imbesi, for example. For the last three years, as president of North American Beverage Inc., Imbesi has had to taste more than a hundred versions of chocolate milk. That arduous task, however, has paid off. He has found the winning combination, and now it is the public's turn to do the tasting. The company's first product, Chocolate Moose - a beverage made of Dutch cocoa and skim milk - is now in supermarkets and convenience stores. The nonfat drink is sold in single-serve boxes with shrink-wrapped straws attached, and in larger glass bottles and aluminum cans.
FOOD
September 18, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
LIGHT ON FLAVOR Considering a switch to "light" dairy products to make this fall and winter's holiday season less fattening? Well, they may have less cholesterol and fewer calories, but light eggnog, sour cream, frozen dairy dessert, yogurt and cheese ranked poorly in Penn State college of agriculture taste tests. "Evaluations by our judging panels reveal that these products don't have the same flavor, body or texture as the products they're supposed to simulate," says Sidney E. Barnard, a Penn State professor of food science.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writersilaryt@phillynews.com
MAYBE WE'LL soon see a national ad campaign with a local high school football player sporting a chocolate milk mustache. And saying at the end of commercials, "Chocolate milk. It does a body good. " Hey, there have been stranger developments in this world - sports portion, included - and, if asked, Josh Messina would be willing to serve. Messina, a junior, is a star inside linebacker for Archbishop Wood and he now carries 180 pounds on his 5-8 frame. Little more than a year ago, his position was outside linebacker and he tipped the scales at 150. What's an underweight guy, especially one being switched to a physically more demanding position, to do?
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
MAYBE WE'LL soon see a national ad campaign with a local high school football player sporting a chocolate milk mustache. And saying at the end of commercials, "Chocolate milk. It does a body good. " Hey, there have been stranger developments in this world - sports portion, included - and, if asked, Josh Messina would be willing to serve. Messina, a junior, is a star inside linebacker for Archbishop Wood and he now carries 180 pounds on his 5-8 frame. Little more than a year ago, his position was outside linebacker and he tipped the scales at 150. What's an underweight guy, especially one being switched to a physically more demanding position, to do?
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
As America prepares for a long Independence Day weekend of picnics, parties and cookouts, Gary Heidnik prepares for his final get-away and his last meal. The choices are many, but the fare is feeble. Heidnik, a convicted killer of two women imprisoned more than a decade and slated to die Tuesday night, gets to pick from among 37 "entrees," 13 different potato dishes, 16 soups, 22 veggies and 12 desserts. There is nothing fancy, no lobster bisque, no broiled scallops, no champagne, not even a beer.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The floor of the new cafeteria was a jumble of Nikes and Pumas showing the first signs of scuff marks yesterday, as students crowded into their high school food court. "Can you hook me up with a slice of that?" asked Joe Trowbridge, 17, a senior, to a noticeably fatigued pizza slicer in an all-white uniform at Upper Merion High School. "Can you buy pretzels here?" inquired Briana Chua, also 17, holding one of the cafeteria's 400 new blue trays. You can. "I don't get it," said sophomore Stephanie Doane, 15. She rested a chocolate milk, a pizza and some peach slices on her tray.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
It's comforting to know that in an ever-changing world, some things manage to remain constant. One such place is the Hitching Post restaurant, at the corner of 17th Street and Atlantic Avenue in North Wildwood. A decade or so ago, when I still had a bit more hair up on top and a little less of a spare tire around my midsection, many summer nights at the Jersey shore began with a meal there. And not because it happens to be located just a couple blocks from my aunt's apartment house, where my friends and I usually stayed.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
That chocolate Easter bunny you're buying - or, if that isn't your thing, that artisanal dark chocolate, that chocolate milk, or that chocolate chip cookie - chances are that, no matter what it is, no matter whose name is on it, Blommer Chocolate Co. was involved. "About 70 percent of our business is making bulk ingredient chocolate for all the brands you know," said Peter Blommer, president and chief operating officer of the family-run company, now in its 75th year and third generation.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, my mother came over this weekend and brought a bottle of "chocolate wine. " That sounded weird enough, but then she poured a glass and it looked like Yoo-hoo. Yuck! Who thinks up this stuff? Marnie: That was probably ChocoVine, Buzz. It's made with red wine, chocolate and cream, and tastes like a lighter, less boozy spin on Bailey's Irish Cream. I find it hard to discern the taste of red wine, personally, but there's no question that that stuff is hyper-popular these days.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
When the artist formerly known as Dolores Hart attended the Academy Awards in 2012, it was her third time on the red carpet and the first time she didn't fret about what to wear. She wore black - her nun's habit, a crisp white wimple framing her radiant face. On a recent sultry July afternoon in Philadelphia, she demonstrates the garment's versatility. It has built-in ventilation, says Mother Dolores, 74, gentling her hem to circulate cool air. Over her headpiece she sports a jaunty black beret.
SPORTS
April 21, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
On my Monday afternoon run, I visualized the end of the New Jersey Marathon. It's an old runner's trick, one meant to help you prepare for the last hard miles of the race. I pictured myself running strong and tall, with solid legs, even cadence, and perfect form. I saw myself moving through the 15,000 people who line the last mile in Long Branch, a fraction of the 40,000 who will come to town for the weekend to support the runners in both the New Jersey Marathon and Long Branch Half.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writersilaryt@phillynews.com
MAYBE WE'LL soon see a national ad campaign with a local high school football player sporting a chocolate milk mustache. And saying at the end of commercials, "Chocolate milk. It does a body good. " Hey, there have been stranger developments in this world - sports portion, included - and, if asked, Josh Messina would be willing to serve. Messina, a junior, is a star inside linebacker for Archbishop Wood and he now carries 180 pounds on his 5-8 frame. Little more than a year ago, his position was outside linebacker and he tipped the scales at 150. What's an underweight guy, especially one being switched to a physically more demanding position, to do?
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | BY TED SILARY, Daily News Staff Writer silaryt@phillynews.com
MAYBE WE'LL soon see a national ad campaign with a local high school football player sporting a chocolate milk mustache. And saying at the end of commercials, "Chocolate milk. It does a body good. " Hey, there have been stranger developments in this world - sports portion, included - and, if asked, Josh Messina would be willing to serve. Messina, a junior, is a star inside linebacker for Archbishop Wood and he now carries 180 pounds on his 5-8 frame. Little more than a year ago, his position was outside linebacker and he tipped the scales at 150. What's an underweight guy, especially one being switched to a physically more demanding position, to do?
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It's nearly midnight on Norwood Road, pitch black and dead quiet, when Daryl Mast brakes his truck and starts unloading product. An unmarked police cruiser pulls up behind us. "Excuse me, what are you doing?" asks the officer from Uwchlan Township. "I'm delivering milk," says Mast pleasantly. He is 38, denim-clad and bespectacled, with a miner's lamp clipped to the brim of his ball cap. In his right hand is a blue plastic crate that cradles a half-gallon bottle of low-fat.
NEWS
January 23, 2006 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
"God bless Chocolate City and its vanilla suburbs. " - Parliament Apparently, the mayor is a funkateer. That's what you call fans of Parliament, the '70s-era funk band famed for hits like "Give Up The Funk (Tear The Roof Off The Sucker)," "Flash Light," and "Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop). " Parliament also recorded "Chocolate City," leader George Clinton's whimsical take on growing black political clout as reflected in the election of black mayors in such towns as Newark, N.J.; Gary, Ind.; Los Angeles, and Washington.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
As America prepares for a long Independence Day weekend of picnics, parties and cookouts, Gary Heidnik prepares for his final get-away and his last meal. The choices are many, but the fare is feeble. Heidnik, a convicted killer of two women imprisoned more than a decade and slated to die Tuesday night, gets to pick from among 37 "entrees," 13 different potato dishes, 16 soups, 22 veggies and 12 desserts. There is nothing fancy, no lobster bisque, no broiled scallops, no champagne, not even a beer.
FOOD
September 27, 1998 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Dad or Mom is a professional chef - one of those exalted folks who delight their patrons in fancy restaurants or gourmet shops with delectable foods bathed in exotically perfect sauces - well, that's just fine for all adults concerned. But what does it mean for certain younger family members who happen to eat lunch in certain cafeteria situations from September to June? It may mean smaller portions of such savory exotica on a daily noontime basis. But for the most part, not. Chefs' children are sort of like Preachers' Kids from the Kitchen - you might think they'd have terribly sensitive palates, that they'd require unusual culinary luncheon offerings every day. But really, they're pretty normal - which means conservative - in what they'll eat. And, like most children, what chefs' kids want to find, when they sit down in the caf with their school friends, is - well, just what their friends are finding.
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