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Cholesterol

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FOOD
December 30, 1987 | By JENNIFER LOWE, Los Angeles Daily News
Leonard Bukofsky of Northridge never made the trip to Las Vegas he and his wife were packing for a year ago. But he still got lucky. Doctors were able to save the life of the 50-year-old company vice president, who suffered a near-fatal heart attack just before the trip. His cholesterol level was so high then, doctors would not tell him what it was. Since then, Bukofsky's cholesterol rate has dropped to a healthy level, and he and his family of six have changed their diet to one low in fat and cholesterol.
FOOD
September 6, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Time was when you could send anyone old enough to cross the street to the store for mayonnaise. Your choices were limited to brand and size, and most of the time only size mattered! But no more - now even the most savvy shopper can come home with the wrong thing without careful label-reading. Mayo manufacturers responded to our desire for reduced-calorie mayonnaise and salad dressings, so we've become used to picking up that familiar jar of mayonnaise that is 60 calories or less per tablespoon (vs. 100 calories for the regular stuff)
FOOD
March 15, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. Both my husband and I are watching our cholesterol and would appreciate an answer to this question: As far as cholesterol content is concerned, how does veal rate as compared to beef pork and lamb? - Mary Libkin Chicago, Ill. A. A 3 1/2-ounce serving of roast beef has 65 to 82 mg. of cholesterol; a 3 1/2-ounce serving of lean roast leg of lamb has 88 mg.; a 3 1/2-ounce lean pork chop has 99 mg; and a 3 1/2-ounce serving of veal cutlet has 100 mg. cholesterol. In other words, although there's not that great a difference among them, veal and pork have the most, then lamb, then beef.
FOOD
December 9, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Following routine medical exams, lots of people are shocked to find that their lab tests put them in the company of cholesterol-watchers. All of a sudden, eggs are virtually off limits - not simply eggs for breakfast but also for main courses, side dishes, sauces and desserts made with large quantities of whole eggs. It's the yolk that provides the most cholesterol: 272 mg, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This is the most concentrated cholesterol source you'll find in the supermarket.
NEWS
March 10, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Customers at fast-food restaurants who order chicken, fish and french fries may be eating as much artery-clogging cholesterol as if they had consumed a helping of beef, it was reported yesterday. Many restaurants fry low-cholesterol chicken and fish in beef tallow - fat trimmed from meat cuts and rendered into shortening, the April issue of Science Digest said. The magazine commissioned Dr. Frank Sacks of the Harvard Medical School to analyze chicken, fish and french fries served at McDonald's, Burger King, Howard Johnson's and Kentucky Fried Chicken.
NEWS
June 16, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, Chuck Jones of Yardley had high cholesterol, but his medicine caused severe leg cramps that routinely ruined his sleep. Since participating in a clinical trial of red yeast rice, a supplement taken in China for centuries, Jones has gotten his cholesterol under control. And within a week of starting the rice, "the pain was gone," the 59-year-old chemist said. For Jones and most other "statin-intolerant" patients, red yeast rice combined with a heart-healthy diet and exercise helped lower bad "LDL" cholesterol, concludes a small study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Will Thompson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of 750 Delaware County residents who were tested recently for blood pressure and cholesterol, 75 percent of them had cholesterol levels above what is medically desirable and 48 percent had high blood pressure. In both categories, women had the highest risk percentage, according to Kathy Scullin, a hospital spokeswoman. Scullin added that 99 percent of the tested residents were white. "I must point out, however, that although women constitute the highest percent of risk, most of them were between 50 and 70 years of age," Scullin added.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
First, we counted calories. Then we began considering cholesterol content in the foods we eat. Now we worry about the cholesterol in our kids' diet, too. Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in some foods that can collect in blood vessels, inhibiting the flow of blood. The liver also manufactures a certain amount of cholesterol that is necessary for healthy cell membranes, development of the spinal cord covering and the production of hormones. Adults with high cholesterol levels have increased risk of heart disease.
NEWS
November 18, 1995
So Thanksgiving barrels down, and with it the annual harvest of 800 numbers to put the novice (or panic-stricken) in touch with the secrets of preparing the centerpiece of the occasion - a bird that was around, of course, long before the birth of Alexander Graham Bell. We've been given to muse of late whether this is progress - being able to telephone for turkey help. What happened to the genetic material from the Massachusetts Bay Colony? Or learning at Mom's knee? Or, doggone it, that most American of traditions - winging it?
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Brigid Schulte, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In what could be a breakthrough in cholesterol research, scientists from the National Institutes of Health announced yesterday that they had isolated a gene responsible for a rare and fatal childhood disease. The discovery, after a search of more than 20 years, may help researchers better understand and treat atherosclerosis, the cholesterol buildup that hardens arteries and can lead to heart disease, strokes and kidney failure. "Heart attack and stroke are the biggest killers in Western society," said Dr. Peter Pentchev, a scientist at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
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NEWS
March 13, 2016 | Associated Press
President Obama rarely takes a day off from the gym and it shows, according to his latest physical exam. The president is in excellent health, lowering his cholesterol level and gaining muscle since his last exam, his personal physician reported last week. Obama, 54, weighed in at 175 pounds, about five less than at his last assessment, in 2014. The 6-foot-1 Obama is focusing on healthy lifestyle choices and exercises daily with a focus on aerobics fitness and resistance weight training, said physician Ronny L. Jackson.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Evidence has been mounting for a few years that raising "good" cholesterol levels is not necessarily helpful in preventing heart disease. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers explains a piece of that complicated puzzle, at least for people with a particular genetic quirk. Good cholesterol is called that because it is a measurement of how much of the waxy, artery-clogging stuff is being shuttled to the liver for disposal, carried by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Anne Bower's doctor suggested she take a statin drug to lower her cholesterol, she had other ideas. Call it a lifestyle redo. Beginning in July 2013, working with doctors and later a nutritionist, Bower began eating lots of beans, greens, and grains; a little fish; and almost no meat. She cut way down on sugar and saturated fat and began doing yoga. She hiked in the Wissahickon and took long walks with the dog. "But the biggest change I made was to increase the number of medicinal plants I use," said Bower, associate biology professor at Philadelphia University in East Falls, who shared her knowledge of those plants with students this semester.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Watching your weight? Hoping for better heart health? Trying to prevent type 2 diabetes? Nuts to all that! It turns out that nuts appear to bestow a wide variety of health benefits, from helping clear out bad cholesterol to cutting down on visceral fat to reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or cancer. The benefits of consuming nuts were emphasized late last year in a large study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Findings revealed that participants in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who ate a fistful of nuts daily were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than those who did not consume nuts.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
For consumers, free is usually good. When the freebie might help you avoid a heart attack, that's usually better. Retail grocery store competition is fierce, and Wegmans is trying to get an edge by giving away - yes, free - a generic version of what was the world's best-selling drug, the cholesterol medicine Lipitor. Based in Rochester, N.Y., Wegmans has several stores in the Philadelphia area. Jo Natale, Wegmans' director of media relations, would not say how many new customers the program had generated, but the company decided to extend the offer at least through the end of 2013 after first planning to end it in April.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Physicians can prescribe a number of effective measures for warding off cardiovascular disease, among them a healthy diet, exercise, and the popular drugs called statins. Yet this family of disease remains the number-one killer in the United States, worse than all cancers combined. Now, two new studies by Philadelphia researchers have yielded intriguing clues toward possible better treatments. Separately, a new class of drugs already in clinical trials appears to rival statins in improving cholesterol levels, though the new drugs have not yet been shown to reduce heart disease.
NEWS
November 4, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania scientists have turned a castoff drug into a novel treatment for a rare, fatal genetic disorder in which ultra-high cholesterol causes heart disease in early childhood. The journal Lancet on Friday published a small but pivotal international study of 29 adult patients who took the drug, called lomitapide. After six months, 14 patients saw their LDL "bad" cholesterol drop by at least half, and 8 reached near-optimal levels that persisted through the end of the study a year later.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Finally some good news about cholesterol and children: A big government study shows that in the last decade, the proportion of children who have high cholesterol has fallen. The results are surprising, given that the childhood obesity rate did not budge. How can that be? Some experts think that while most children might not be eating less or exercising more, they may be getting fewer trans fats. That's because the artery-clogging ingredient has been removed or reduced in many processed or fried foods.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. is trying to improve its place in the cholesterol drug market but its latest attempt faces another hurdle. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to Merck, said the company needed to provide more data before the agency could further consider an application for a new drug that combines Merck's cholesterol drug Zetia and a generic version of Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor. So many people's arteries are clogged with cholesterol-produced plaque that drug companies are looking for ways to retain revenue from established drugs, ward off generic competitors, and try new combinations that might yield future profits.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
More children should be screened for high cholesterol before puberty, beyond those with a family history of problems, according to wide-ranging new guidelines expected from government-appointed experts who seek to prevent heart disease later in life. The new advice will be presented Sunday at an American Heart Association conference by some members of a panel for the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Any call for wider screening is likely to raise concern about overdiagnosing a condition that might not cause problems for decades, if ever.
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