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SPORTS
December 9, 2012 | By Kate Harman, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Archbishop Carroll girls' basketball team is well aware of how young it is. After all, having three sophomores in the starting lineup is hard to ignore. But instead of viewing their inexperience as a negative, the Patriots are looking to turn it around. That was the message from their coaching staff Saturday afternoon, after the Patriots lost their season-opening game to Christ the King (N.Y.), 54-39. "I didn't expect it to be as frustrating," Sarah Curran said of the opener in the Blue Chip Tip-Off Classic at Carroll.
SPORTS
February 9, 1998 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Cardinal O'Hara girls' basketball team found out firsthand what Archbishop Carroll had found out firsthand Feb. 1 at the Palestra. Simply, Christ the King is good. Very good. The Royals, the top-rated team in the nation, dumped the visiting Lions, 78-46, Saturday night in Middle Village, N.Y. Christ the King (17-0) was up by 17 at the half and was never really challenged by the Lions (13-6). "They just play great man-to-man defense," O'Hara coach Linus McGinty said.
SPORTS
February 17, 2004 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes a loss in February pays big dividends the next month. That's certainly what Absegami girls' basketball coach Greg Goodwin is hoping after his team suffered its first loss yesterday since last March. Even though Absegami won its first 20 games this season and is ranked No. 1 in South Jersey by The Inquirer, too many of the victories were lopsided affairs. The only close wins were against three Inquirer top 10 teams - No. 3 Willingboro, No. 4 Camden Catholic and No. 6 Haddonfield.
SPORTS
February 5, 1996 | By Neil S. Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Cardinal O'Hara began playing nationally prominent girls' basketball power Christ the King on an annual basis in 1989. The Lions have never defeated the Royals, but it seemed as if yesterday's game offered a great opportunity. Although both teams entered the game with 15-0 records, the Lions appeared to have the edge. Former Christ the King superstar Chamique Holdsclaw had graduated and gone to Tennessee, and none of the players remaining averaged more than nine points a game.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
John N. Schaeffer Jr., 76, of North Hills, a retired senior partner in the law firm of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius and an active layman in the United Church of Christ, died Monday at Abington Memorial Hospital after a lengthy illness. Mr. Schaeffer practiced corporate and securities law at the Center City firm more than 40 years, until his retirement in 1983. He worked on several railroad reorganizations, including that of Penn Central, and his practice included work in South and Central America.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | by Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
If Jesus Christ returned one day, would anyone recognize him? Would he have a job? Would he live in a house or an apartment? City or suburbs? These are the types of questions that inspired the writing of a book called "Joshua" (Collier Books, $8.95) by Joseph F. Girzone, a retired priest. The book is about a man who moves into a cottage on the outskirts of a small, tightly knit town where everyone knows everyone else by first name and gossip is treated as something to be savored and served in a group of no less than three people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And so, for the second time this evening, "Jesus" fell for the first time. He dropped to one knee. The cross on his shoulder leaned forward, and he bowed his head. "OK, Jesus, that was better," a woman's voice called out, "but we want to feel the weight of the cross. The weight - look at me, Jesus - the weight should be reflected in your back. You sag under the cross. OK?" Crouched in the white marble brilliance surrounding the altar of St. John the Evangelist Church, "Jesus" sagged his back and opened his eyes.
SPORTS
May 16, 2006 | By Mel Greenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drexel basketball coach Bruiser Flint yesterday announced the signing of Robert Hampton, a 6-foot-4 swingman out of powerful Christ the King High in New York. Hampton was also a wide receiver on the football team. He was the first Christ the King athlete to be named to the all-city team in two sports. "He's a good player, he works hard and he's tough," Flint said of Hampton, who led his high school team to the New York City Catholic League final with an average of 15.6 points per game.
SPORTS
January 29, 1996 | By David T. Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For an entire half on Saturday night, Archbishop Carroll's girls' basketball team had one of the best teams in the country running scared. The host Patriots played a relentless but confident game on offense and defense. They came back five times from deficits, and by halftime, they held a one-point lead on a flustered Christ the King team from New York City. But as quick as a New York minute, Christ the King showed Carroll in the third quarter why it is ranked sixth in the nation by one poll.
NEWS
May 19, 2008 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If America is ever going to have a healthy conversation on race, it must first turn down the volume, a black Philadelphia preacher told a largely white congregation in Wayne yesterday. The Rev. Derick B. Wilson, pastor of a poor, multiracial Kensington congregation, told several dozen congregants of United Church of Christ at Valley Forge in Wayne that empathy for the struggles of others would help to dismantle distrust. "Martin Luther King said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere," Wilson said during a 20-minute sermon.
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NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Orlando R. Barone
  In my consulting work, I have on occasion assisted individuals intent on creating a start-up company. I tell them they must come up with a comprehensive business plan that answers key questions related to the prospects for success in the proposed venture. Some time ago I came upon just such a business plan, remarkable for many reasons, just one of which was the fact that it was written in 1947, well before the advent of many modern business practices. Also, the entrepreneur was a woman.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, STAFF WRITER
About 50 people standing on Camden's Farnham Park green Friday afternoon shouted, "Change" and "Enough is enough," while some prayed. Cars passed and honked, and some pedestrians joined the crowd. Representing about a dozen community advocacy groups and organizations in Camden, the 50 gathered to show solidarity with the city and country in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. "Camden does not agree with what's going on in the nation, but we do agree on keeping love, peace, and respect present," said Arnold Steward, 59, of Operation Camden for Christ.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
Anyone interested in the future of new music in the city might have paid close attention to Timothy Weiss' dates last weekend with Orchestra 2001. The ensemble's search for a new artistic leader hasn't exactly gone as planned - snow prevented one candidate's appearance, and another withdrew - but Weiss reminded listeners this was less a search for conducting competence than for taste. It's safe to consider Sunday night's program at Christ Church Neighborhood House an expression of Weiss' interest in a particular aesthetic.
NEWS
December 25, 2015
Vonette Bright, 89, who with her husband cofounded Campus Crusade for Christ, has died of complications from leukemia in Orlando. A spokeswoman for the organization, Alison Geist, confirmed the death Tuesday. Mrs. Bright and her husband, Bill Bright, helped build the ministry into a worldwide evangelical force with a presence in 173 countries and 25,000 staffers. The Brights launched Campus Crusade for Christ in 1951 at UCLA, and the ministry soon spread to other university campuses.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The title of Seth Rozin's new comedy The Three Christs of Manhattan is also more or less its content. There's Dr. Posner (Leah Walton), an atheist-Jewish psychiatrist, single and childless, to whom the deluded Christs each make the case for their divinity, - but really, it's just a matter of figuring out which Christ is the truest measure of our time. The Three Christs of Manhattan receives its world premiere at the InterAct Theatre Company, where Rozin is also founding artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
After decades of performers tirelessly homing in on the kernel of any Bach masterpiece, the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia revisited a wide-lens view of the St. Matthew Passion on Sunday - specifically, the 1841 Leipzig edition adapted and conducted by Felix Mendelssohn, who helped the world realize how great Bach was. The concert was the U.S. premiere of that edition (and one that was to feature star bassist Eric Owens, who was sidelined by...
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Becoming a consecrated virgin, says Judith Stegman, means there's one thing you'll do without - obviously - and one you'll definitely need: A sense of humor. In the era of The Bachelorette and Dating Naked , of Fifty Shades of Grey and Snoop Dogg's "Ain't No Fun (If the Homies Can't Have None)," a woman who chooses to live in reverent chastity can seem a curiosity. " 'Are you married?' - it's a common question," Stegman said. "I say, 'Well, I have a ring. I'm a consecrated virgin in the Catholic Church, and that means I'm married to Christ.'" Stegman, 58, is president of the U.S. Association of Consecrated Virgins, dozens of whom gathered Wednesday at the Philadelphia Archdiocese's offices to talk about their lives in advance of a formal convocation in Malvern.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Siedlecki, 92, a longtime resident of Haddonfield who was a career lineman for New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. from 1949 to 1988, died Tuesday, March 4, at Ann's Choice, the retirement community in Warminster where he had lived since 2008. Mr. Siedlecki, who was born in Philadelphia, graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden and studied briefly at what is now Drexel University. After completing a welding course at the Pennsauken campus of what is now Camden County Technical Schools, he worked a night shift helping to build oceangoing tankers at the Sun Shipbuilding plant in Chester.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jimmy B. Oldham, 89, a Churches of Christ minister who retired in 1989 after three decades as a junior high school English teacher in Cherry Hill, died Saturday, Jan. 11, of complications from infections in the Old Bridge division of Raritan Bay Medical Center. In February 1995, Mr. Oldham and his wife, Sara, were the victims of an invasion of their home in Willingboro, their son James T. said. "When the guy was on top of him, with a knife at his throat, he started preaching to the kid," his son said.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the summer, a few longtime friends went to visit Margaret Hurff Toudy at Virtua Health & Rehab Center in Lumberton. "Three of them came in and spent about three hours with her," daughter Judy Meli said. "A real hoot. A whole lot of laughter. " Before she was injured a few years ago, her daughter said, Mrs. Toudy was one of a group of eight high school friends - the Girls' Club, they called themselves - who met about once a month. For more than 70 years. On Thursday, Nov. 14, Mrs. Toudy, 92, of Lumberton, president in the 1960s of the parent-teacher association at Christ the King Regional School in Haddonfield, died at Samaritan Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly.
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