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Christmas Cards

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NEWS
August 21, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When she was a coed in the Great Depression, she had a raccoon coat and a black Buick. When she died last year, she had a half-million dollars. In between, Doris Virginia Broome taught third grade for 40 years and lived a quiet, conservative life, with few frills and fewer confidences. So nearly everyone who knew her was surprised when she willed her small fortune to a college whose reunions she had stopped attending. Doris Virginia Broome has made Glassboro State's bright summer a little brighter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1990 | By Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Dad, sporting his fave crimson cardigan, looks lovingly into his wife's eyes. Their five children gleefully gather around the dinner table as the smell of roast turkey wafts through the house. Hallmark Cards' poinsettia-lined vision of the holidays is usually conjured up by a Norman Rockwell print, but this time, there's a twist: Mom, Dad and the kids are black. Although Hallmark has been selling Christmas cards for black consumers for 25 years, an increasing number of stores, including the local majors like Wanamaker's and Strawbridge and Clothier, are offering a wider selection of black-themed cards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Veronica Marché Miller's "Fabulous Brown Girls" Christmas cards speak to the yuletide spirit of every woman's inner girly-girl. The Philadelphia-area fashion illustrator's flirty holiday greetings, also available on wine sleeves and gift bags, show coquettish women of color donning fit-and-flares (with real sequins) and knee-length boots carrying armfuls of perfectly wrapped presents. She may be dressed in a red, off-the-shoulder dress and poised to place a star on top of a tree.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By MARK RANDALL
Here's a space-age, sure-fire method to cut your Christmas card writing time in half. I realize that a lot of you are thinking, "Aren't we past this now, it being January and all?" Well, maybe you are, but I'm not. I've got a stack of these cards just sitting in my in-basket waiting to be addressed and mailed. Despite evidence entirely to the contrary, I permit myself to suppose that there are millions of others in the same condition as myself, people who have not yet done their holiday cards.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By David Rohde, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Christmas cards for township employees add up, says Supervisor Mary K. Smithson. Her get-tough proposal: that the township not send Christmas cards to its employees and save $192.25. "We are in hard economic times, and we haven't given employees a salary raise. I would expect that they would rather have a raise than get a card," Smithson said. Smithson's proposal was voted down, 4-1, at Wednesday night's supervisors meeting, but the proposal was a sign of the times in Newtown Township, as it begins to grapple with next year's fiscal budget.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Walking into federal court each morning, Alyson Borgesi, wife of reputed Philadelphia mob consigliere George Borgesi, has made a habit of greeting those present with a now familiar refrain. "Enjoying the show?" she asks, cracking a sardonic smile. But as her husband's racketeering retrial entered its second month last week, she increasingly found herself cast as his unwilling costar. The trial came to an early halt Friday after four jurors accused the petite, 38-year-old brunette - a woman whose resumé includes stints as a travel agent and candy saleswoman - of trying to intimidate them from the court gallery, Borgesi family members said.
NEWS
November 3, 2001
From the mouths of kids: A thoughtful and sensitive reader wrote a letter to the editor this week suggesting a way America could get around this anthrax mail problem. Mike LaRosa is just 11, but despite his young age - or perhaps because of it - he proposed a remedy that is impressively straightforward. Send more postcards, Mike said. The young man was talking about Christmas cards, and his special concern is postal workers and their potential exposure to spores lurking within sealed envelopes.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight days before Christmas, Maureen Reyes wandered among the red-and-green festooned aisles of Spain's Card & Gift Shop on Chestnut Street - looking for a birthday card. "I send out a lot less Christmas cards than I used to. I used to do a big mailing, but now I just send them to the people who are important, good friends and relatives," says Reyes of Juniata Park. Another Spain's customer, Leon Schoenhell, a hairdresser at Nan Duskin's, concurred: "I cut down to about half because it was getting way out of hand.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Officer Aisha Perry was working the 4-to-midnight shift and had just come on duty when she received an assignment to check on an elderly woman whom a friend had been trying to contact all day. Perry had gotten dozens of similar calls in the past. It was nothing out of the ordinary - at the time. But it evolved into one of Perry's saddest, and most tenderhearted, assignments. Arriving at the house in the city's Olney section, Perry discovered that the woman, 77-year-old Margaret Taylor, had died of natural causes, a part of the job that Perry experienced many times in the past.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the spirit of the season, state Sen. M. Joseph Rocks, Philadelphia Republican and erstwhile city controller candidate, has sent out Christmas cards to 3,000 people. At least they look like Christmas cards, although they may be as much in the spirit of state politics as in the spirit of the season. Rocks didn't pay for the cards himself. Rocks said yesterday that he dipped into his campaign accounts for $1,300 to help pay for the cards and postage, even though, in his words, the cards are not meant to be a "campaign piece.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dean cheated on Tori? There's trouble in the one ideal marriage Americans turn to for succor in their time of need: Tori Spelling 's man, Dean McDermott , has (allegedly) committed adultery. Us Weekly claims Dean, 47, was in his native Toronto to publicize his show, Chopped Canada , when he decided to spit (figuratively) on his holy contract with Tori so he could have carnal knowledge of one Emily Goodhand , 28, a fan he met that day. Ms. Goodhand tells Us, "He told me he and Tori had a sexless marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Veronica Marché Miller's "Fabulous Brown Girls" Christmas cards speak to the yuletide spirit of every woman's inner girly-girl. The Philadelphia-area fashion illustrator's flirty holiday greetings, also available on wine sleeves and gift bags, show coquettish women of color donning fit-and-flares (with real sequins) and knee-length boots carrying armfuls of perfectly wrapped presents. She may be dressed in a red, off-the-shoulder dress and poised to place a star on top of a tree.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
BENSALEM Eighth grader Nicholas Pizzo used to visit his grandmother regularly in a nursing home. He described the facility as a "dull and dreary" place. "You could tell they weren't happy to be there," Pizzo, 13, of Bensalem, said of the residents. So when the St. Charles Borromeo School student sat down to write a Christmas card to an elderly woman he'd never met, he could kind of relate to her situation. "God is watching over you," Pizzo wrote to the woman, living in a facility away from home and family.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Walking into federal court each morning, Alyson Borgesi, wife of reputed Philadelphia mob consigliere George Borgesi, has made a habit of greeting those present with a now familiar refrain. "Enjoying the show?" she asks, cracking a sardonic smile. But as her husband's racketeering retrial entered its second month last week, she increasingly found herself cast as his unwilling costar. The trial came to an early halt Friday after four jurors accused the petite, 38-year-old brunette - a woman whose resumé includes stints as a travel agent and candy saleswoman - of trying to intimidate them from the court gallery, Borgesi family members said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
I bet your Christmas tree looks gorgeous. And I'm equally certain that if it's a live tree, in a week or two it will be dropping needles and you'll be eager to get rid of it. But you're not going to put it out at the curb with the trash, right? That would be naughty, not nice. Instead, recycle - or treecycle - it. Waste experts say that Americans' trash cans are bulging bigger than Santa's sack in the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's. We produce something like 25 percent more trash then that at any other time of year.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
By Ellen Scolnic and Joyce Eisenberg We're Jewish. Our husbands are Jewish and our kids are Jewish. We've been Jewish for thousands of years. It's not news to us that we don't celebrate Christmas. We've never had a Christmas tree. Never cooked a holiday ham. Never strung the bushes outside our homes with colored lights. But that doesn't mean we don't enjoy yours. We love the trappings of Christmas. We are in the minority - among the 3 percent of Americans who celebrated Hanukkah.
NEWS
December 22, 2012
By Susan FitzGerald I start my Christmas cards early because it's my annual chance to spend time with my address book. This year, when I pulled out the tattered book, I calculated its age as almost 39. The address book was a high school graduation gift, and at the time I marveled at how cool it was. Forget traditional brown: My book was pinkish-red, skinny, and a foot long. Paging through the book is like revisiting key moments of my life. Even the handwriting speaks to various stages.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
There are many things I love about this day. Being with family. A religious service. Exchanging gifts. The meal. Nat King Cole's Christmas Album and Sid Mark spinning Sinatra, both in the background. But when the house gets quiet, I'll partake in a more personal tradition: slowly reviewing this year's Christmas cards. I enjoy sending and receiving, and Rule No. 1 is that if you like the latter, you have to do the former. We usually get ours out a little after Thanksgiving, which is also when I put a small box in the kitchen to collect the incoming.
NEWS
December 22, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
THE RAZOR WIRE atop the prison fence glistened yesterday morning and winter's first winds whipped tears from Sue Aitken's eyes. But the foreboding walls, the frigid air and almost two years of guilt did not dampen her mood. "I haven't woken up with a smile in a long, long time," she said, beaming with excitement as she went inside. An hour later, her son, Brian Aitken, 27, walked out of Mid-State Correctional Facility, in Burlington County near Fort Dix, less than 24 hours after New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie commuted to time-served his seven-year sentence for weapons possession.
NEWS
December 10, 2010
I'M EXPECTING a lot more Christmas cards in the mail this year. That's because Hallmark has come out with a way to send your holiday greetings without actually buying the cards, writing the message, licking the stamps and walking to the post office. It'll handle everything for you with the press of a button. All you need to do is choose the type of card you want from an online list, plug in a formulaic greeting, provide a facsimile of your signature and - before you can say "Season's Cheatings" - your holiday cards are signed, sealed and delivered.
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