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Christmas Celebration

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NEWS
December 25, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
About 600 children from underprivileged families attended a party last Sunday at Auletto's Caterers in Almonesson sponsored by the Gloucester County Board of Freeholders. Among the festivities were games, a performance by Hawaiian Way dancers, clowns and - of course - a special preview appearance by St. Nicholas.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wearing long, flowing satin costumes, Alice and Jenny Wang took deep breaths and tucked away the red and gold envelopes containing their "lucky money" before they stepped on stage to perform The Water Dance. Alice, 17, and Jenny, 16, felt there was no way they could get this dance wrong - they had choreographed it and practiced for weeks. But a wish for luck couldn't hurt. After all, they were dancing in front of 150 of their friends and family, members of the South Jersey Taiwanese Association of America during the organization's Christmas celebration Saturday.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saturday marked the seasonal grand opening of the Christmas Village, located in the heart of Love Park. The outdoor village consists of over 60 vendors selling holiday gifts and treats from both the United States and Europe. The village, now in its fifth year in Philadelphia, is inspired by a similar tradition held in Germany that began as early as the Middle Ages. On hand to kick off the Christmas celebration were representatives from German American Marketing, Inc. and One Main Financial, the village's main sponsors.
LIVING
December 8, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mercedes Stewart was touched by the boy's unselfish letter to Santa. It struck a theme that ran through many of the 200 pieces of mail received by the Camden Rescue Mission: Children seemed more concerned this year about their parents' battle to pay bills than about receiving toys, said Stewart, who runs the mission with her minister husband. "I am writing this letter because I see my mom struggle every day just to get by," wrote 14-year-old Rashad Ervin, the oldest of three children who are being raised by a single, unemployed mother in East Camden.
NEWS
January 2, 2007
RE ANNETTE BUSH'S letter on the Christmas Eagles-Cowboys game: First, there have been NFL games on Christmas since 1971. Why is it a problem now? And you are obviously out of touch with the psyche of the Delaware Valley. I didn't encounter one person not looking forward to enjoying a meal with his family and THEN, as a family, gathering around to watch their beloved Eagles do battle with the hated Cowboys. If anything, it brought a little something extra to the day. No one had to decide between his family and the Eagles unless someone who wanted their way or the highway forced him to choose.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Music Critic
With Christmas less than two weeks away, the record stores are again stocked with the latest batch of holiday albums. Most of them are quick-buck ventures. Every year, yet another soprano turns out a collection of her favorite carols, and while the music may be lovely, the orchestrations are generally maudlin and the vocalism uninspired. Similarly low marks belong to the other standard Christmas packages: the collections put together by every choir from New York to Budapest; the complete and abridged versions of Messiah and The Nutcracker; the various compilations of baroque and Renaissance pieces recorded by big orchestras, small period-instrument ensembles and pickup groups alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
A host of holiday happenings, plus Rosenshontz in concert with a program previewing its new album, round out this weekend's eclectic events for children. Sunday, the Kaiserman Branch of the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Philadelphia presents its Community-Wide Hanukah Party. The free celebration has enough activities to fill the sides of a dreidel, including arts-and-crafts projects, participatory Israeli folk dancing, a menorah- lighting ceremony and Israeli music performed by singer Arlette Twersky.
NEWS
December 22, 1996 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Down through the ages there has been a Christmas Eve caller who has had a special relationship with children. In the past, he has gone by several names, including St. Nicholas and Kriss Kringle. Today, he is that fatherly figure known as Santa Claus. Yet whatever he was called, he was a nonthreatening, benevolent figure whom children loved as they do today. But during the 19th century in the Pennsylvania German communities of our region, there was another late-night caller who was just the opposite of Nick, Kriss and Santa.
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
For Dane and Joan Wells, Christmas in Cape May is a Victorian history lesson. Inside the Wellses' Queen Victoria Inn, three Christmas trees reflect the changes in British society during the 63-year reign of Queen Victoria that began in 1837. Each tree represents a different period in that era, from the simple table-top tree decorated with fruits and candies, as was the custom in the 1840s, to the elaborate full-length tree adorned with expensive store- bought ornaments popular in the 1890s.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
The message was perfect, but the colors left something to be desired. Banners with bold white letters on a pale blue background, hanging from the second-floor balcony of the GUM department store in Moscow, blazed out the words: "Merry Christmas Moscow - Happy New Year World. " But to the discerning and very traditional eye of the Rev. J.W. Canty, the proper banner colors would have been red and green. It's hard, however, to revive traditions when most people around you don't even know that they exist.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 30, 2012
AROUND THIS time of year, some people like to celebrate the season the same way they have in years gone by. They see "The Nutcracker," attend a tree-lighting, admire the lights in Rittenhouse Square or window shop on Walnut Street. And those traditions are wonderful ways to enjoy the most wonderful time of the year. But some of us are - shall we say - nonconformists. Some observe "Buy Nothing Day" instead of Black Friday and would rather not endure a concert of Christmas carols. It's for those rebels that we've searched through holiday performances, exhibits, and events to find the most interesting, unusual, and under-the-radar happenings.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saturday marked the seasonal grand opening of the Christmas Village, located in the heart of Love Park. The outdoor village consists of over 60 vendors selling holiday gifts and treats from both the United States and Europe. The village, now in its fifth year in Philadelphia, is inspired by a similar tradition held in Germany that began as early as the Middle Ages. On hand to kick off the Christmas celebration were representatives from German American Marketing, Inc. and One Main Financial, the village's main sponsors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
The Thanksgiving turkey is sliced up for sandwiches and Black Friday is in the rear-view mirror. Here comes. . . Christmas! And along with it, here comes a blizzard of holiday specials, some of them around long enough that aging baby boomers can watch them with their grandchildren. Here are some of the highlights: Tuesday 8 p.m. 6ABC. Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas . The green meanie tries to wreck Whoville's Christmas in the 1966 animated version, with Boris Karloff voicing the Grinch.
NEWS
January 2, 2007
RE ANNETTE BUSH'S letter on the Christmas Eagles-Cowboys game: First, there have been NFL games on Christmas since 1971. Why is it a problem now? And you are obviously out of touch with the psyche of the Delaware Valley. I didn't encounter one person not looking forward to enjoying a meal with his family and THEN, as a family, gathering around to watch their beloved Eagles do battle with the hated Cowboys. If anything, it brought a little something extra to the day. No one had to decide between his family and the Eagles unless someone who wanted their way or the highway forced him to choose.
NEWS
December 22, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Even if you love Christmas music, the sugar rush can make you ill. Billboard reports that 2,100 different Christmas titles have been purchased by fans this year, including bad new ones by insipid sax man Kenny G. and faux classical Euro dudes Il Divo, and a collection of flatulent sounds called Jingle Smells that includes "Silent Butt Deadly Night. " Let me tell you: It stinks. But it's all not holly jolly garbage. Jazz singer Diana Krall's quite classy Christmas Songs is the breakout hit of the season, at No. 17 on the Billboard album chart earlier this week.
NEWS
December 26, 2003 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sleep still lingered in Sharice Jones' eyes as the 9-year-old slid into the church pew at St. Malachy Church for Christmas Mass. It was after 10 a.m., but Sharice and her 11-year-old sister, Sheila, had started celebrating Christmas almost as soon as the clock did. "Five after 12 they were up," said their great-grandmother, Clydie Jones, 78. "They opened up every present. " "Actually, it was a minute after 12," Sheila said. "Oh, excuse me," replied Jones, who with 10 children, 23 grandchildren, "and umpteen dozen great-grandchildren," is accustomed to sass.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | By Vaclav Havel
A dominant feature of Prague is the Gothic tower of the Cathedral of St. Vitus, St. Wenceslas and St. Adalbert. That tower is now wrapped in scaffolding because it is being renovated. Temporarily, the scaffold conceals the tower's beauty. That concealment, however, is designed to preserve this beauty forever. Perhaps this scaffolding serves as an analogy for our world, and particularly that of the post-Communist countries. If some of our best features are not quite visible for the time being, it is because the societies are undergoing change, striving anew - this time in complete freedom - to rediscover and restore our true identities.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
More than 200 volunteers from Crossing Community Church in Newtown are preparing for a colonial Christmas celebration this weekend. The free event will include a 1777 military encampment, craft demonstrations, colonial games, and visits from George Washington and friends. The celebration is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 7 p.m. Sunday at the Janney homestead, a 14-acre property where the church is located. Visitors can take guided tours of the 18th-century farmhouse on the grounds.
LIVING
December 8, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mercedes Stewart was touched by the boy's unselfish letter to Santa. It struck a theme that ran through many of the 200 pieces of mail received by the Camden Rescue Mission: Children seemed more concerned this year about their parents' battle to pay bills than about receiving toys, said Stewart, who runs the mission with her minister husband. "I am writing this letter because I see my mom struggle every day just to get by," wrote 14-year-old Rashad Ervin, the oldest of three children who are being raised by a single, unemployed mother in East Camden.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | By Ciaran McNally, FOR THE INQUIRER
The moon, the sun and tradition converge this year, and it's a lucky thing for the University of Pennsylvania Museum - and a lot of other places that have gotten into multiculturalism in a big way. The museum has put together a joint celebration of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and even the winter solstice, all under one roof and billed as Peace Around the World. Children can sign up for workshops on the holiday traditions of six cultures. (Kids, get ready to bash a pinata and play with a dreidel.
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