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Christmas Dinner

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NEWS
December 26, 1995 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Gina Campbell examines a pair of gloves being given to her by Ianto Owens at the Salvation Army's Gateway Service Center on Hamilton Street near 9th in Center City. The center hosted Christmas dinner for the homeless and other less fortunate individuals. The dinner was sponsored by Dave & Buster's, Zanzibar Blue and eight other restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I have been living together for nine months. We have decided to host Christmas dinner at our house and invited 20 people - 10 from each of our families. His mother, unfortunately, is having a hard time accepting that her 27-year-old son is growing up. She says that she feels "awkward" and that their family has had its traditions for many years. (My boyfriend has spent every Christmas Eve and Christmas night at his parents' house since birth.) I come from a family that is adaptable to change.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A single-parent family Hanukkah celebration will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the JCC Kaiserman, 45 Haverford Rd., Wynnewood. The cost is $3 for nonmembers, $2 for members. CHRISTMAS Chester East Side Ministries, Ninth and Potter Streets, will present a live Nativity scene from 3 to 4 p.m. Saturday, followed by a Christmas dinner, from 4 to 7 p.m. A live Nativity will also be on display from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday at C.C. Hancock Memorial United Methodist Church, 542 Wesley Rd., Springfield.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | By RICHARD LOWELL NYGAARD
It was the Christmas of '46 or '47. I don't suppose it really matters, except to say that the Depression that hit America in '29 had not yet left our little home in Thief River Falls, Minn. Dad was a butcher. But in the frigid, Northern Minnesota winters he was perpetually sick with asthma unless he left home to seek work in the warmer and drier west. Mom did "day work" for people who couldn't afford a full- time maid, and took in washing and ironing to help make ends meet. But, I didn't know it. This was the carefree time when life was young.
NEWS
December 26, 1986 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Young walked out of the mayor's conference room at City Hall yesterday evening bound for the subway, to spend the night. The place he really wanted to go, he said, was Brooklyn, N.Y., but all he had on him was a token, a quarter and a new grooming kit. The kit was a gift from the Committee for Dignity and Fairness for the Homeless, which sponsored a Christmas dinner last night in City Hall. Young was one of about 400 homeless men and women who crowded into Room 201 at City Hall between 5 and 7 p.m. yesterday for helpings of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes and macaroni salad.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Cops: Woman stole from cop's wife at eatery * Broad Street near Spruce Wanda Singleton's name, and all 31 of her aliases, are probably at the top of Santa's naughty list this year. Singleton, 46, was caught with her hand in a cop's wife's purse when she tried stealing from the woman as a group of Upper Darby police officers and their spouses waited for a table for a Christmas dinner Sunday night in Center City, said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
TO THE THUGS who robbed the beauty salon on Wadsworth Avenue the day before Christmas Eve: The salon was filled with hard-working women, some of whom had brought their little girls to a place where you thought you could get your hair done and while you wait read a book, talk on your cell phone or just relax from the frenzy that usually precedes the holidays. Here's hoping that while you sat having Christmas dinner with your family, a loved one, maybe your mother, sister or grandmother, told everyone of the harrowing ordeal that she went through at the beauty salon: How you and your two cohorts burst in with your weapons drawn declaring a holdup and for everyone to get on the floor.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | By Wes Conard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four years ago, John Capuzzi and his then-girlfriend Joyce spent Christmas night combing southern Delaware County for a place to eat, but found everything closed - an irony that did not escape them. "We joked that we were like Mary and Joseph looking for the inn," Capuzzi said. "We were kind of estranged from our families and we were feeling sorry for ourselves because there was no place open. " Eventually, they found a pub - Bennigans, to be exact - and over a nontraditional holiday dinner of chicken fajitas they decided that they would create a place for people with no place to go on Christmas.
NEWS
December 23, 1987 | By Renee V. Lucas from USA Today, the Washington Post, Us magazine, and the New York Daily News
OLLIE & JOHN: DOWN BUT NOT OUT Although Contra-versial cohorts Oliver North and John Poindexter may not get invited to many of the big Washington to-dos anymore, they did attend last week's Christmas bash hosted by Vice President George Bush. He and wife Barbara generally have several Christmas gatherings for members of the administration, the press, the Supreme Court, Congress, their staffs, family and friends. "They are among the people routinely invited," said Steve Hart, the VP's acting press secretary.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | By Mark E. Neumann, Special to The Inquirer
Most charity organizers in Chester County will tell you that, even during this holiday season, there never seems to be enough to go around to the less fortunate: the hot Christmas dinner, the warm clothes and the presents around the tree. But not this year, Doylestown area businesses have decided. In the Greater Downingtown Area Chamber of Commerce newsletter this month, readers may have raised an eyebrow over the following announcement: Members of the Christmas Committee "will not be making a second appeal since they have sufficient funds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I'M HOSTING Christmas dinner for 16, and I'm kind of sweating it. I never sweat hosting the Thanksgiving meal, since the menu, by state law and family decree, must never change: Roasted turkey, a hay bale of stuffing, 87 different potato sides and enough desserts to stock a Wegmans pastry case, if Wegmans sold only chocolate pastry. Same old, same old, and everyone's happy. Christmas is different in that, menuwise, anything goes - so anything is possible, including failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
No ducking it. This is your last chance to enjoy the daffy, down-home charm of the Robertsons. Duck Dynasty , which for some fowl reason has become must viewing on Wednesday nights, finishes its second season this week (10 p.m. on A&E) with an hour-long holiday special: "I'm Dreaming of a Redneck Christmas. " No, I'm not making up that title. Down in Louisiana, they wear their lack of couth proudly. For the uninitiated, Duck Dynasty is a reality show devoted to the spectacularly hirsute Robertson clan, which is living large down in the bayou, thanks to a very successful hunting accessory company founded by old man Phil.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By CAROLYN HAX
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question : My husband's brother is in the middle of a very nasty divorce, and my husband and I are grieving the loss of a wonderful friendship with our ex-sister-in-law. The brother has been adamant about our cutting ties with her. We are not so sure we can do this, and have been thinking of including her in our holiday plans. Would you agree that it's OK to make an exception at holidays, especially for someone who doesn't really have other family in the area?
NEWS
December 23, 2011
By Todd R. Nelson In 11th-grade shop class, I worked all fall on a dining room table. It would be a Christmas present for my parents, and a great surprise. My teacher offered me the project based on something he had seen in a woodworking design book - a butcher block table five feet in diameter. It was the biggest shop project I had ever done. Week after week, during the two periods before history class, I worked away, sawing two-inch-thick pine boards into square strips, laminating them into 12-inch sections, joining the sections, and then cutting a circle out of the large square blank.
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chef Jean-Marie Lacroix pulls a shallow copper pan out of the oven, the smell of garlic, butter, and parsley-rich escargots hits the nose before the dish hits the table. To Lacroix, the fragrance is rich with nostalgia - snails mean Christmas to this French chef. It's really all his Center City home needs to complete the motif. He is as adept with pruning shears as he is with prunes, so his cozy abode is filled with greenery, and now, overflowing with glitter-dusted poinsettias.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: This time of year is all about family and tradition. It's not really about convenience. I am 48 and the youngest of four children. We each have two to four children, some have grandchildren, plus our father. Before our mother passed, 13 years ago, Christmas dinner was held at our parents'. Now three of the four children rotate having Christmas for 25 to 28 people (one sibling lacks the space to host). Last Christmas, there were some difficulties with communication and settling on a date.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Cops: Woman stole from cop's wife at eatery * Broad Street near Spruce Wanda Singleton's name, and all 31 of her aliases, are probably at the top of Santa's naughty list this year. Singleton, 46, was caught with her hand in a cop's wife's purse when she tried stealing from the woman as a group of Upper Darby police officers and their spouses waited for a table for a Christmas dinner Sunday night in Center City, said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I have been living together for nine months. We have decided to host Christmas dinner at our house and invited 20 people - 10 from each of our families. His mother, unfortunately, is having a hard time accepting that her 27-year-old son is growing up. She says that she feels "awkward" and that their family has had its traditions for many years. (My boyfriend has spent every Christmas Eve and Christmas night at his parents' house since birth.) I come from a family that is adaptable to change.
NEWS
December 24, 2010 | By Acel Moore, Inquirer Columnist
This is the first time in two years that I have written for this page. In case you are like me and a little forgetful, I'll remind you that I worked for 43 years as a reporter, associate editor, and twice-weekly columnist for The Inquirer before retiring in 2005. This year, my life changed dramatically, and not only because I have reached an age at which I can no longer deny my senior status. In March, I underwent the first of five spinal-cord surgeries that ultimately left me paralyzed from the waist down.
NEWS
August 23, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 20th century, Howard Schultz's father was a Philadelphia traffic officer who worked the 15th and Locust Streets intersection with "Stop" and "Go" placards. And so, at a 1950 ceremony in which Schultz himself became a Philadelphia policeman, The Inquirer reported, "the badge and service pistol that his father, Harry Schultz, retired policeman, wore a quarter of a century ago were presented to [the] rookie" by his father. The son rose a bit higher than the father.
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