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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | staff
Winners last night at the 82nd annual Academy Awards: Motion Picture: "The Hurt Locker. " Actor: Jeff Bridges, "Crazy Heart. " Actress: Sandra Bullock, "The Blind Side. " Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, "Inglourious Basterds. " Supporting Actress: Mo'Nique, "Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire. " Director: Kathryn Bigelow, "The Hurt Locker. " Foreign Film: "El Secreto de Sus Ojos," Argentina. Adapted Screenplay: Geoffrey Fletcher, "Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A version of this review appeared in Sunday's Arts + Entertainment section. Neck-deep into Quentin Tarantino's antebellum western Django Unchained , I had this mental image of the über-geek genre filmmaker tapping furiously on his laptop, beaming at the brilliance of every new piece of dialogue he's writ. For all I know, Tarantino works on a typewriter, or longhand on a legal pad (or dictates his copy to a Gal Friday in spike heels), but in any event, as the banter ping-ponged across the dining table in the plantation mansion of slave-master Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio, twirling his mustache)
NEWS
January 4, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Hurt Locker, Kathryn Bigelow's urgent Iraq war thriller about a squad that defuses improvised explosive devices, collected three top prizes yesterday at the National Society of Film Critics meeting in New York. The group cited it as best film of 2009, with Bigelow the best director and Jeremy Renner the year's best actor. The independent film has dominated critics' awards this season, earning kudos from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the New York Film Critics Circle, and the Boston Society of Film Critics.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
ABOUT an hour into "Muppets Most Wanted," just about the time you think its morphed into a bad "Bond" movie, up pops a muppet with a set of metal jaws. A la Richard Kiel in "The Spy Who Loved Me," the umpteenth spy movie referenced in the latest Muppet caper, which follows the Bourne-again gang on a world tour that a crook (Ricky Gervais) and a Soviet Kermit look-a-like are using as a front for a series of jewel heists. The tour takes them to Berlin, Madrid, Dublin and London (almost as if Disney is mechanically expanding the brand's global footprint)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE THREE dumped-on employees from "Horrible Bosses" become management in the sequel, but find that life gets no easier. This time, the leads (Charlie Day, Jason Bateman, Jason Sudekis) start their own business, borrow from a pair of not-so-angelic "angel" investors (Chris Pine, Christoph Waltz) and end up trying to raise cash via a hare-brained kidnapping scheme. This allows the cast to have a go at spoofing the conventions of the caper movie - we get an imagined account of the plan unfolding perfectly, then the blundering reality of the three stooges doing everything wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2014 | Reprinted from Wednesday's Inquirer. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Horrible Bosses comedy franchise is like a recipe full of ingredients that you'd think would go well together. But the taste ends up being off anyway. At least the title fits better in this sequel because this time, hapless salarymen Nick, Kurt, and Dale (Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, and Charlie Day) are working for themselves. Turns out they're even more desperately inept as businessmen than they are as criminals. Horrible Bosses 2 gets off to a fast and funny start.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
THE SPOILS of an epic Oscar war went to "The Hurt Locker," which won Best Picture last night by beating the world's most popular movie, "Avatar. " The movie won six awards in all (to "Avatar's" three). Kathryn Bigelow, who helmed the Iraq war drama "The Hurt Locker," became the first woman to win an Oscar for Best Director (an award presented by Barbra Streisand). "There's no other way to describe it, it's the moment of a lifetime," said a tearful Bigelow, who dedicated the award "to the women and men in the military who risk their lives on a daily basis.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
When last we visited Quentin Tarantino, he was in the "killin' Nazi bidness," and bidness was indeed boomin', to paraphrase Brad Pitt. His "Inglourious Basterds" violated all known rules of decorum regarding Holocuast art, and this seemed to bother no one - the movie attracted Oscar nominations and made $100 million. Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel have warned artists against any treatment of the Holocaust that denied its inexorable nihilistic reality. Tarantino sidestepped all that to give us a garish fantasy of a Jewish avenger burning Hitler alive in a movie theater - the fire starts in a spool of film, so Hitler is literally killed by movies.
NEWS
March 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Kathryn Bigelow made history last night at the 82d Annual Academy Awards, becoming the first woman to win best director, for The Hurt Locker , which captured six awards, including best picture. The tense film about thrill junkies who defuse bombs in Iraq won original screenplay, sound editing, sound mixing and editing. "This really is - there's no other way to describe it - the moment of a lifetime," said Bigelow, 58, who dedicated her award to "the women and men in the military who risk their lives on a daily basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He moved us with his award-winning performance as President Abraham Lincoln in the Steven Spielberg saga. But did you know that Daniel Day-Lewis was himself moved beyond words, beyond reason, beyond love itself? "There has never been a human being that I never met that I loved as much as him - ever," the thesp says on the extra features on the Lincoln Blu-ray/DVD release. "I doubt there ever will be. " So deeply was Day-Lewis immersed in the spiritual and mental viscera of Lincoln, he found himself at an existential impasse after he finished the pic. "You're not quite sure what to do with yourself when it's finished," he says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | Steven Rea, Movie Critic
The movies of summer 2016 are rife with reboots and remakes, sequels and prequels, superheroes and supervillains. They're also full of cats and dogs - Weiner-Dog, The Secret Life of Pets, and Nine Lives , to name but three. Here's a select list of the high-profile Hollywood fare and more modest indie and art house titles coming to the big screen between now and Labor Day. If you experience an especially intense sense of déjà vu reading these capsule summaries, that's not necessarily because there are so many retreads and redos among them - some of the following blurbs appeared in an earlier summer movies roundup piece published in the Inquirer, Daily News, and on philly.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2014 | Reprinted from Wednesday's Inquirer. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Horrible Bosses comedy franchise is like a recipe full of ingredients that you'd think would go well together. But the taste ends up being off anyway. At least the title fits better in this sequel because this time, hapless salarymen Nick, Kurt, and Dale (Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, and Charlie Day) are working for themselves. Turns out they're even more desperately inept as businessmen than they are as criminals. Horrible Bosses 2 gets off to a fast and funny start.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE THREE dumped-on employees from "Horrible Bosses" become management in the sequel, but find that life gets no easier. This time, the leads (Charlie Day, Jason Bateman, Jason Sudekis) start their own business, borrow from a pair of not-so-angelic "angel" investors (Chris Pine, Christoph Waltz) and end up trying to raise cash via a hare-brained kidnapping scheme. This allows the cast to have a go at spoofing the conventions of the caper movie - we get an imagined account of the plan unfolding perfectly, then the blundering reality of the three stooges doing everything wrong.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
ABOUT an hour into "Muppets Most Wanted," just about the time you think its morphed into a bad "Bond" movie, up pops a muppet with a set of metal jaws. A la Richard Kiel in "The Spy Who Loved Me," the umpteenth spy movie referenced in the latest Muppet caper, which follows the Bourne-again gang on a world tour that a crook (Ricky Gervais) and a Soviet Kermit look-a-like are using as a front for a series of jewel heists. The tour takes them to Berlin, Madrid, Dublin and London (almost as if Disney is mechanically expanding the brand's global footprint)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
He moved us with his award-winning performance as President Abraham Lincoln in the Steven Spielberg saga. But did you know that Daniel Day-Lewis was himself moved beyond words, beyond reason, beyond love itself? "There has never been a human being that I never met that I loved as much as him - ever," the thesp says on the extra features on the Lincoln Blu-ray/DVD release. "I doubt there ever will be. " So deeply was Day-Lewis immersed in the spiritual and mental viscera of Lincoln, he found himself at an existential impasse after he finished the pic. "You're not quite sure what to do with yourself when it's finished," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A version of this review appeared in Sunday's Arts + Entertainment section. Neck-deep into Quentin Tarantino's antebellum western Django Unchained , I had this mental image of the über-geek genre filmmaker tapping furiously on his laptop, beaming at the brilliance of every new piece of dialogue he's writ. For all I know, Tarantino works on a typewriter, or longhand on a legal pad (or dictates his copy to a Gal Friday in spike heels), but in any event, as the banter ping-ponged across the dining table in the plantation mansion of slave-master Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio, twirling his mustache)
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
When last we visited Quentin Tarantino, he was in the "killin' Nazi bidness," and bidness was indeed boomin', to paraphrase Brad Pitt. His "Inglourious Basterds" violated all known rules of decorum regarding Holocuast art, and this seemed to bother no one - the movie attracted Oscar nominations and made $100 million. Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel have warned artists against any treatment of the Holocaust that denied its inexorable nihilistic reality. Tarantino sidestepped all that to give us a garish fantasy of a Jewish avenger burning Hitler alive in a movie theater - the fire starts in a spool of film, so Hitler is literally killed by movies.
NEWS
February 26, 2012
Dr. Seuss' The Lorax See Steven Rea's preview on this page. In Darkness A Polish man takes great risks while rescuing Jews in his Nazi-occupied city. Various languages with subtitles. Project X See Steven Rea's preview on this page. Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie Two filmmakers blow the billion dollars they're given to make a movie and set about trying to re-raise the money to pay back their very upset investors. Undefeated See Steven Rea's preview on this page.
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