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Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

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NEWS
July 24, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors at Thomas Jefferson University have discovered why the wonder drug Gleevec, heralded for turning off cancer cells, may cause congestive heart failure in a small number of patients. And implications of the research may extend beyond Gleevec, revealing potential pitfalls in a whole class of cancer drugs that work in a similar way, the report's authors say. The study followed up on 10 patients who developed severe heart failure after taking Gleevec. Those cases were first reported in 2004 by the University of Texas' M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mayor Mary Duffy wants to put the rumor mill to rest: Yes, she is sick, but, no, she is not on her deathbed. Sitting in her office yesterday, Duffy, 59, confirmed that she has "a rare form of leukemia. " Like all cancers, it is life threatening, but Duffy said that her prognosis was good and that she remained optimistic. "I haven't let it stop me," the mayor said. "People who know me know I'm a strong individual. " The cancer was diagnosed in late spring after she went to see her doctor complaining of fatigue.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | By Mark Peters, Special to The Inquirer
A bone marrow donor drive will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday in Trinity Hall, behind St. Joan of Arc Church in Marlton, in hopes of saving the life of Tony Iannuzzi, a Marlton resident who suffers from chronic myelogenous leukemia. Iannuzzi, chief custodian of Lenape Regional High School, needs to find a blood match as near as to perfect as possible to receive the bone-marrow transplant needed to stem the progress of his disease. During Sunday's donor drive, tests for blood type will be taken on the spot.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: My 90-year-old husband has arthritis of the hip and is investigating the best exercise he might consider for maximum control of the condition and the pain. Would a stationary bike be appropriate, or is something else better? A: A stationary bike would be fine. So would swimming, brisk walking and mild calisthenics. Ordinarily, I encourage patients to find their own level of exercise, within the limits of pain. It's especially important to engage in activity that is enjoyable, otherwise the project becomes too much of an effort and most people give up exercising after a few weeks.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Philadelphia scientists have reported the development of a powerful new way to pinpoint cancerous cells months earlier than was previously possible. The method, based on a genetic technique, has the potential for saving thousands of lives because it can detect a relapse in victims of leukemia, lymphomas and other cancers, said Jorge J. Yunis, vice chairman of the department of neoplastic diseases at Hahnemann University and one of the study's co-authors. "This technique can pick out one cancerous cell out of a million cells," he said.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For more than a decade, Todd Newkirk, 30, has fought for his life. He suffers from chronic myelogenous leukemia. His health has recently deteriorated, and he needs a bone-marrow transplant, scheduled for Tuesday, to survive. The congregation of Newkirk's church, Grace Lutheran, has rallied to his aid, raising money to help defray his mounting medical bills. Members have collected nearly $11,000 using various fund-raising methods, including a concert Saturday. In addition, two national Lutheran organizations are helping.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Bernard Hinerfeld, 75, formerly of Center City, a retired pediatric dentist and an accomplished photographer, died of leukemia Saturday, July 30, at Ivy Ridge Retirement Home in Sacramento, Calif. Dr. Hinerfeld grew up in West Oak Lane and graduated from Central High School in 1953. He considered becoming a rabbi, said his daughter, Laura, and studied Judaism at Gratz College. He then attended Temple University and earned a dental degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1964.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron and Christal Walker live in dread that their daughter will get sick, and in dread that she won't. Six days ago, Avrey Walker, 9, of Redmond, Ore., became the seventh child to receive an experimental gene therapy for leukemia at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She will soon suffer several days of fevers, nausea, headaches, maybe worse - if the therapy works as it should, marshalling her immune T cells to fight her cancer. Four of the first five children to undergo treatment and get lab results are cancer-free, according to their families and doctors.
SPORTS
October 9, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Mikael Samuelsson had a goal and an assist to lift the Detroit Red Wings to a 4-2 win over the visiting Edmonton Oilers last night. Chris Chelios, Tomas Holmstrom and Kris Draper also scored for Detroit. Nicklas Lidstrom and Henrik Zetterberg each had two assists. Chelios, the NHL's oldest player at 45, skated in his 1,550th game, breaking a tie with Hall of Famer Alex Delvecchio to move into eighth place on the career list. Dominik Hasek made 18 saves for the Red Wings.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Mark Peters, Special to The Inquirer
Tony Iannuzzi has more friends than he can count. And many came out last weekend to support him. Last Sunday the Marlton Post Office organized a softball game against a team of celebrity athletes at Cherokee High School. The proceeds from the game and a refreshment-and-baked-goods sale helped defray the ever-increasing costs that the Marlton resident faces. After he couldn't shake a chest cold, Iannuzzi was given a blood test and diagnosed as having chronic myelogenous leukemia in November.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron and Christal Walker live in dread that their daughter will get sick, and in dread that she won't. Six days ago, Avrey Walker, 9, of Redmond, Ore., became the seventh child to receive an experimental gene therapy for leukemia at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She will soon suffer several days of fevers, nausea, headaches, maybe worse - if the therapy works as it should, marshalling her immune T cells to fight her cancer. Four of the first five children to undergo treatment and get lab results are cancer-free, according to their families and doctors.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Bernard Hinerfeld, 75, formerly of Center City, a retired pediatric dentist and an accomplished photographer, died of leukemia Saturday, July 30, at Ivy Ridge Retirement Home in Sacramento, Calif. Dr. Hinerfeld grew up in West Oak Lane and graduated from Central High School in 1953. He considered becoming a rabbi, said his daughter, Laura, and studied Judaism at Gratz College. He then attended Temple University and earned a dental degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1964.
NEWS
February 23, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Chesnick, 72, a Cherry Hill dentist known for singing to patients while he drilled, pulled, or fixed their teeth, died Sunday of leukemia and cardiac complications at Virtua-Marlton. In 1963, Dr. Chesnick, a Philadelphia native, was looking for a spacious home in South Jersey to start a family with his wife, Marilyn - one that could also accommodate a dental office. The couple found a house in the newly developed Woodcrest section of Cherry Hill. Dr. Chesnick liked the idea of having an office in a new area of town, his son Andrew said.
SPORTS
October 9, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Mikael Samuelsson had a goal and an assist to lift the Detroit Red Wings to a 4-2 win over the visiting Edmonton Oilers last night. Chris Chelios, Tomas Holmstrom and Kris Draper also scored for Detroit. Nicklas Lidstrom and Henrik Zetterberg each had two assists. Chelios, the NHL's oldest player at 45, skated in his 1,550th game, breaking a tie with Hall of Famer Alex Delvecchio to move into eighth place on the career list. Dominik Hasek made 18 saves for the Red Wings.
NEWS
July 24, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors at Thomas Jefferson University have discovered why the wonder drug Gleevec, heralded for turning off cancer cells, may cause congestive heart failure in a small number of patients. And implications of the research may extend beyond Gleevec, revealing potential pitfalls in a whole class of cancer drugs that work in a similar way, the report's authors say. The study followed up on 10 patients who developed severe heart failure after taking Gleevec. Those cases were first reported in 2004 by the University of Texas' M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Renee Rich thought she had a lingering cold in April 1991 when her doctor told her it was leukemia. The 23-year-old hairdresser from Marple Township pledged her life to helping others just before her death on Nov. 23, 1994. Footprints for Leukemia, a nonprofit organization that assists families with critically ill children, is keeping Rich's promise, said Betty Rudloff, Rich's aunt. "Renee talked about helping others after she was cured. The day she died, I decided to keep the fund going in her memory," Rudloff said.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mayor Mary Duffy wants to put the rumor mill to rest: Yes, she is sick, but, no, she is not on her deathbed. Sitting in her office yesterday, Duffy, 59, confirmed that she has "a rare form of leukemia. " Like all cancers, it is life threatening, but Duffy said that her prognosis was good and that she remained optimistic. "I haven't let it stop me," the mayor said. "People who know me know I'm a strong individual. " The cancer was diagnosed in late spring after she went to see her doctor complaining of fatigue.
SPORTS
March 27, 1997 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Reactions to the death last week of driver John Nemechek, the first fatality of the three-year-old Craftsman Truck series, showed a close-knit community on NASCAR's varied levels of competition. Nemechek, who celebrated his 27th birthday four days before the March 16 race, suffered irreparable brain injuries when his Chevrolet C/K-1500 slammed into the wall of Turn One - fewer than 25 laps from the finish at the Metro-Dade Homestead Motorsports Complex. Joe Nemechek, John's older brother and a regular on the Winston Cup circuit, was in Las Vegas competing in a Busch Grand National race at the time of the accident.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For more than a decade, Todd Newkirk, 30, has fought for his life. He suffers from chronic myelogenous leukemia. His health has recently deteriorated, and he needs a bone-marrow transplant, scheduled for Tuesday, to survive. The congregation of Newkirk's church, Grace Lutheran, has rallied to his aid, raising money to help defray his mounting medical bills. Members have collected nearly $11,000 using various fund-raising methods, including a concert Saturday. In addition, two national Lutheran organizations are helping.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Philadelphia scientists have reported the development of a powerful new way to pinpoint cancerous cells months earlier than was previously possible. The method, based on a genetic technique, has the potential for saving thousands of lives because it can detect a relapse in victims of leukemia, lymphomas and other cancers, said Jorge J. Yunis, vice chairman of the department of neoplastic diseases at Hahnemann University and one of the study's co-authors. "This technique can pick out one cancerous cell out of a million cells," he said.
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