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Chronic Pain

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NEWS
October 2, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
I have a chronic dull ache around the left side of my breastbone, which sometimes radiates to my shoulder. What could cause this, and what treatment would you recommend? There are many causes of chronic chest pain. Two of the most common are costochondritis (inflammation of the cartilage attaching the ribs to the sternum or breastbone) and intercostal myalgia (an irritation of the muscles between the ribs). These diagnoses are often difficult to establish because the pains are vague and there are no confirming lab tests.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly a third of Americans experience long-lasting pain - the kind that lingers for weeks to months - and too often feel stigma rather than relief from a health-care system poorly prepared to treat them, the Institute of Medicine said Wednesday. The staggering tab: Chronic pain is costing the nation at least $558 billion a year in medical bills, sick days, and lost productivity, the report found. That's more than the cost of heart disease, the No. 1 killer. All kinds of ailments can trigger lingering pain, from arthritis to cancer, spine problems to digestive disorders, injuries to surgery.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Bucks County commissioners approved a contract yesterday that would allow doctors to prescribe physical therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic services and other nonmedicinal treatment to prison inmates who suffer from chronic pain, despite strong reservations voiced by the chairman. County health officials, who oversee inmates' medical treatment, say the alternative treatment will save the county money because it will reduce physician fees and will cut the growing costs of prescription drugs.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012
Chase Utley, who has missed all of the Phillies' season so far while recovering from chronic pain in both of his knees, played his third rehab game as a designated hitter with the single-A Clearwater Threshers on Thursday. Here is how he's done so far.    AB   H   BB   K   2B   3B   HR   RBI   R      Tuesday   5   0   0   3   0   0   0   0   0    Wednesday   5   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   2    Thursday   3   0   2   0   0   0   0   0   0    TOTALS   13   1   2   3   0   0   0   1   2   
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Chase Utley is headed north from Florida and could be activated by the Phillies as soon as Wednesday, according to a report. Comcast SportsNet's Jim Salisbury, citing an unnamed source, reported late Saturday that Utley would finish the last stage of his rehab in the Philadelphia area, possibly including a game with triple-A Lehigh Valley. Utley, who has not played with the Phils this season because of chronic pain in his knees, started his second straight game at second base for the Clearwater Threshers on Saturday.
NEWS
April 14, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF
Cephalon Inc., of Frazer, said today that its oral medication to treat breakthrough cancer pain has received European regulatory approval. The medicine is an oral formulation of the pain therapy fentanyl for adult patients who already take an opioid medicine, such as morphine or Percocet, for underlying chronic pain. The drug, called Effentora in Europe, was approved in the United States in September 2006 under the name Fentora. Cephalon said that approval by the European regulatory commission means the biopharmaceuticals company can sell the treatment in the 27 states within the European Union.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. announced it would buy rights to promising compounds that treat pain and other neurological disorders - in a deal worth up to $475 million - from Neuromed Pharmaceuticals Ltd., a Conshohocken company developing pain medicines. The companies said yesterday that Merck would pay an initial $25 million for exclusive rights to Neuromed's experimental drugs, including Neuromed's lead compound, NMED-160, a calcium channel blocker to treat chronic pain in mid-stage Phase 2 clinical trials.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Rory Sweeney FOR THE INQUIRER
It might be hard to believe, but only in the past 20 years has care based on evidence become a major focus for the medical community, said Jeffery Lerner, chief executive of Plymouth Meeting-based ECRI. The nonprofit research agency, which tests the claims of medical devices, research and practices, is looking for facts in the subjective realm of pain management. Starting today, ECRI is hosting a conference on the evidence, or lack thereof, in treating chronic pain and the use of such drugs as Oxycontin and other potentially addictive painkillers.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
If you exercise and part of your body starts to hurt, it's wise to cool it two ways - figuratively with rest and literally with ice. That rule-of-thumb prescription generally works when something hurts, but because pain is so individual, it is important to evaluate the severity and duration of each particular pain. Basically, pain is an unpleasant feeling that results from an injury or infection. There are two general categories of pain. Acute pain is short-term pain, whether mild or severe, caused by an identifiable injury or trauma, such as breaking an arm or surgery.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neuromed Pharmaceuticals Ltd., a Conshohocken company developing pain medicines, announced yesterday that it had raised $53.3 million in private financing to develop an opioid painkiller. The spin-off biotechnology company from the University of British Columbia, with research operations in Vancouver, Canada, is collaborating with Merck & Co. Inc. on compounds that block N-type calcium channels and are aimed at preventing the transmission of neuropathic and inflammatory pain signals.
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NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and medical organization officials released new guidelines Thursday for prescribing opioids, one of the first concrete steps that Pennsylvania has taken to address an overdose death rate that ranks among the worst in the nation. After months of discussion, collaboration, and compromise, a large task force requested by Gov. Corbett last fall announced the recommendations to help doctors responsibly prescribe narcotic painkillers. "The guidelines have a twofold mission," said Physician General Carrie DeLone, a task force cochair.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON Four years after New Jersey became the 14th state to adopt a medical-marijuana program, legislators took testimony from dispensary operators and patient advocates who are proposing changes to give the struggling program a jump-start. After the hour-long Assembly Regulatory Oversight Committee hearing ended Thursday, Chairman Reed Gusciora (D., Mercer) said the legislators would discuss the issues and "hopefully make improvements to the program" by introducing legislation and working with the state Department of Health.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Chase Utley is headed north from Florida and could be activated by the Phillies as soon as Wednesday, according to a report. Comcast SportsNet's Jim Salisbury, citing an unnamed source, reported late Saturday that Utley would finish the last stage of his rehab in the Philadelphia area, possibly including a game with triple-A Lehigh Valley. Utley, who has not played with the Phils this season because of chronic pain in his knees, started his second straight game at second base for the Clearwater Threshers on Saturday.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012
Chase Utley, who has missed all of the Phillies' season so far while recovering from chronic pain in both of his knees, played his third rehab game as a designated hitter with the single-A Clearwater Threshers on Thursday. Here is how he's done so far.    AB   H   BB   K   2B   3B   HR   RBI   R      Tuesday   5   0   0   3   0   0   0   0   0    Wednesday   5   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   2    Thursday   3   0   2   0   0   0   0   0   0    TOTALS   13   1   2   3   0   0   0   1   2   
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Associated Press won a Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting Monday for documenting the New York Police Department's widespread spying on Muslims, while the Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa. - and in particular, 24-year-old reporter Sara Ganim - were honored for local reporting that broke the Penn State sexual abuse scandal. David Wood of the Huffington Post won for national reporting for a look at the suffering endured by American veterans wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
November 21, 2011
Long-term pain in the jaw tied to general pain sensitivity People with long-term jaw pain disorders seem to be more sensitive than average to pain in other parts of their body, according to a study led by the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Researchers gave questionnaires and physical exams to 1,600 healthy people and 185 who had suffered from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ) for at least six months. The University of Maryland team developed special tools for testing pain and sensory perceptions.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly a third of Americans experience long-lasting pain - the kind that lingers for weeks to months - and too often feel stigma rather than relief from a health-care system poorly prepared to treat them, the Institute of Medicine said Wednesday. The staggering tab: Chronic pain is costing the nation at least $558 billion a year in medical bills, sick days, and lost productivity, the report found. That's more than the cost of heart disease, the No. 1 killer. All kinds of ailments can trigger lingering pain, from arthritis to cancer, spine problems to digestive disorders, injuries to surgery.
NEWS
April 20, 2011 | By Anita Gupta, For The Inquirer
Many medical stories recently have discussed the issue of pain management. A Consumer Reports survey reported a particularly compelling finding: 97 percent of doctors polled thought they were at least somewhat effective at minimizing pain and discomfort. Within that group, 37 percent said they were "very effective. " Unfortunately, the difference between "very" and "somewhat" is anything but minor. Individual patients suffer needlessly, and that suffering has an effect on a larger scale.
SPORTS
October 28, 2010 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the middle of August, between his third and fourth cortisone injections, when Placido Polanco first acknowledged that he probably would need surgery on his left elbow after the season. The Phillies third baseman was hit on the elbow by a Tim Hudson pitch in an April 21 game at Atlanta. That merely aggravated what was a chronic injury to Polanco's elbow, full of tendinitis and bone fragments. But he played through it, with his manager and the athletic training staff cringing every time Polanco was plunked on the elbow or had to make a diving play to his left at third.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2010
DEAR ABBY: My best friend of 30 years, "Andrea," and her husband decided not to have children. They are happy with their dogs and cats. She recently adopted a 10-year-old rescue dog and changed the dog's name to "Monique. " Abby, Monique is my daughter's name! When I asked Andrea why she changed the dog's name, she said it is because no one in her family has that name. I am hurt that she would name her dog after my daughter, her godchild - so much so that I no longer wish to speak to this woman.
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