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Chronic Pain

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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
In a drab meeting room in West Philadelphia, a group of aging veterans with chronic back pain gathered for a dose of what their teacher called "breath as medicine. " Psychologist Lisa Rambaldo led the mostly male group through a series of gentle yoga positions that improve balance and strengthen muscles that support the spine, along with breathing exercises that free the mind. While they lay on the floor hugging their knees to their chests, she told them to notice any tension.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
I have a chronic dull ache around the left side of my breastbone, which sometimes radiates to my shoulder. What could cause this, and what treatment would you recommend? There are many causes of chronic chest pain. Two of the most common are costochondritis (inflammation of the cartilage attaching the ribs to the sternum or breastbone) and intercostal myalgia (an irritation of the muscles between the ribs). These diagnoses are often difficult to establish because the pains are vague and there are no confirming lab tests.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly a third of Americans experience long-lasting pain - the kind that lingers for weeks to months - and too often feel stigma rather than relief from a health-care system poorly prepared to treat them, the Institute of Medicine said Wednesday. The staggering tab: Chronic pain is costing the nation at least $558 billion a year in medical bills, sick days, and lost productivity, the report found. That's more than the cost of heart disease, the No. 1 killer. All kinds of ailments can trigger lingering pain, from arthritis to cancer, spine problems to digestive disorders, injuries to surgery.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Bucks County commissioners approved a contract yesterday that would allow doctors to prescribe physical therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic services and other nonmedicinal treatment to prison inmates who suffer from chronic pain, despite strong reservations voiced by the chairman. County health officials, who oversee inmates' medical treatment, say the alternative treatment will save the county money because it will reduce physician fees and will cut the growing costs of prescription drugs.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
C.J. Rhoads imagines she might have had two futures after the car accident 14 years ago that left her with ongoing memory problems and chronic back pain. In the one she seemed to be headed for, she'd still be overcome by pain, taking oxycodone, and lying in bed much of the time. She'd probably be on disability, but couldn't afford to keep her Berks County home. In the other one, the one she actually got, she still hurts, but she rarely takes medicines. She's taken charge of her pain with an intense, holistic approach that includes exercise, diet, stress reduction and therapy.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and medical organization officials released new guidelines Thursday for prescribing opioids, one of the first concrete steps that Pennsylvania has taken to address an overdose death rate that ranks among the worst in the nation. After months of discussion, collaboration, and compromise, a large task force requested by Gov. Corbett last fall announced the recommendations to help doctors responsibly prescribe narcotic painkillers. "The guidelines have a twofold mission," said Physician General Carrie DeLone, a task force cochair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
About half the states have legalized marijuana for medical use, and Pennsylvania appears ready to join them. Most patients who sign up for the drug indicate they're taking it for pain. But is there evidence that it works? Simple question, complicated answer. Turns out it works for some kinds of pain, but not others, and helps some people more than others. "The short answer is yes," said David Casarett, director of palliative care for Penn Medicine and author of  Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012
Chase Utley, who has missed all of the Phillies' season so far while recovering from chronic pain in both of his knees, played his third rehab game as a designated hitter with the single-A Clearwater Threshers on Thursday. Here is how he's done so far.    AB   H   BB   K   2B   3B   HR   RBI   R      Tuesday   5   0   0   3   0   0   0   0   0    Wednesday   5   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   2    Thursday   3   0   2   0   0   0   0   0   0    TOTALS   13   1   2   3   0   0   0   1   2   
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Chase Utley is headed north from Florida and could be activated by the Phillies as soon as Wednesday, according to a report. Comcast SportsNet's Jim Salisbury, citing an unnamed source, reported late Saturday that Utley would finish the last stage of his rehab in the Philadelphia area, possibly including a game with triple-A Lehigh Valley. Utley, who has not played with the Phils this season because of chronic pain in his knees, started his second straight game at second base for the Clearwater Threshers on Saturday.
NEWS
April 14, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF
Cephalon Inc., of Frazer, said today that its oral medication to treat breakthrough cancer pain has received European regulatory approval. The medicine is an oral formulation of the pain therapy fentanyl for adult patients who already take an opioid medicine, such as morphine or Percocet, for underlying chronic pain. The drug, called Effentora in Europe, was approved in the United States in September 2006 under the name Fentora. Cephalon said that approval by the European regulatory commission means the biopharmaceuticals company can sell the treatment in the 27 states within the European Union.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
In a drab meeting room in West Philadelphia, a group of aging veterans with chronic back pain gathered for a dose of what their teacher called "breath as medicine. " Psychologist Lisa Rambaldo led the mostly male group through a series of gentle yoga positions that improve balance and strengthen muscles that support the spine, along with breathing exercises that free the mind. While they lay on the floor hugging their knees to their chests, she told them to notice any tension.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
C.J. Rhoads imagines she might have had two futures after the car accident 14 years ago that left her with ongoing memory problems and chronic back pain. In the one she seemed to be headed for, she'd still be overcome by pain, taking oxycodone, and lying in bed much of the time. She'd probably be on disability, but couldn't afford to keep her Berks County home. In the other one, the one she actually got, she still hurts, but she rarely takes medicines. She's taken charge of her pain with an intense, holistic approach that includes exercise, diet, stress reduction and therapy.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Q. I've read so much about people overdosing on prescription pain medicines (opioids) that I'm afraid to take them even as directed by my doctor. Are they bad drugs? A. Opioids such as morphine, oxycodone and fentanyl are excellent drugs for treatment of many types of severe pain. They can be prescribed for short- or long-term use, or somewhere in between. When used properly - following a prescriber's directions and subsequent proper monitoring by a healthcare professional - this class of therapeutics can greatly benefit a patient.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
After working as a nurse for 25 years, Theresa LaMonaca woke up one morning in the summer of 2002 not able to move. "I was incredibly ill, I swelled," LaMonaca, 57, of Washington Township, recalled. "I was in awful, awful pain. " More than six months of uncertainty about her ailment followed before LaMonaca was diagnosed with lupus. "If you knew me before I was sick," LaMonaca said. "They used to call me the Energizer Bunny. I would do amazing things. " She remembers the severity of her symptoms during that time and the years that followed, including blood clots, chronic pain, infections, and intense headaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
About half the states have legalized marijuana for medical use, and Pennsylvania appears ready to join them. Most patients who sign up for the drug indicate they're taking it for pain. But is there evidence that it works? Simple question, complicated answer. Turns out it works for some kinds of pain, but not others, and helps some people more than others. "The short answer is yes," said David Casarett, director of palliative care for Penn Medicine and author of  Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana.
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Oh, that winter-dry skin. (Itch, itch.) That welt from a mosquito bite. (Scratch, scratch.) The plague of itching has many sources, and it's the mission of the Temple Itch Center to sort everything out and bring itchers much-longed-for relief. Among many different itches, the center focuses especially on chronic itching - any itch that lasts longer than six weeks. We spoke recently with its founder and director, Gil Yosipovitch, chair of the dermatology department at Temple University Medical School and widely considered a world itch expert.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and medical organization officials released new guidelines Thursday for prescribing opioids, one of the first concrete steps that Pennsylvania has taken to address an overdose death rate that ranks among the worst in the nation. After months of discussion, collaboration, and compromise, a large task force requested by Gov. Corbett last fall announced the recommendations to help doctors responsibly prescribe narcotic painkillers. "The guidelines have a twofold mission," said Physician General Carrie DeLone, a task force cochair.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON Four years after New Jersey became the 14th state to adopt a medical-marijuana program, legislators took testimony from dispensary operators and patient advocates who are proposing changes to give the struggling program a jump-start. After the hour-long Assembly Regulatory Oversight Committee hearing ended Thursday, Chairman Reed Gusciora (D., Mercer) said the legislators would discuss the issues and "hopefully make improvements to the program" by introducing legislation and working with the state Department of Health.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Chase Utley is headed north from Florida and could be activated by the Phillies as soon as Wednesday, according to a report. Comcast SportsNet's Jim Salisbury, citing an unnamed source, reported late Saturday that Utley would finish the last stage of his rehab in the Philadelphia area, possibly including a game with triple-A Lehigh Valley. Utley, who has not played with the Phils this season because of chronic pain in his knees, started his second straight game at second base for the Clearwater Threshers on Saturday.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012
Chase Utley, who has missed all of the Phillies' season so far while recovering from chronic pain in both of his knees, played his third rehab game as a designated hitter with the single-A Clearwater Threshers on Thursday. Here is how he's done so far.    AB   H   BB   K   2B   3B   HR   RBI   R      Tuesday   5   0   0   3   0   0   0   0   0    Wednesday   5   1   0   0   0   0   0   1   2    Thursday   3   0   2   0   0   0   0   0   0    TOTALS   13   1   2   3   0   0   0   1   2   
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