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Chuck Bednarik

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SPORTS
August 12, 2007
3 Chuck Bednarik. In 1960, plenty of players in the NFL might have thought they could play both ways, but one did, and excelled. Chuck Bednarik was the last iron man of pro football. When linebacker Bob Pellegrini pulled a groin muscle against Cleveland in the fifth game of the season, coach Buck Shaw looked at the 35-year-old Bednarik and said, "Get in there, Chuck, but don't pull any hero stuff. " Because he played both ways to help lead the Eagles to the 1960 world championship - the franchise's last - Bednarik solidified his spot among the greatest Eagles of all time.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
ANYONE WHO grew up in the Philadelphia area, no matter when you happened to be born, knows about "the hit. " If you need additional explanation, you must be a newcomer (either that, or you watch the "Godfather" trilogy on a loop). "The hit," the only one truly worth talking about in mythic terms, is the one that Chuck Bednarik put on Frank Gifford in the game between the Eagles and the Giants at Yankee Stadium on Nov. 20, 1960. I was born a year and two weeks later. Yet although biology insists that I wasn't even conceived at the time when Gifford was impersonating a log, I feel that moment as if I'd watched it in real time.
SPORTS
January 27, 2004 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neither an angry Chuck Bednarik nor an AWOL Harry Kalas dimmed the enthusiasm last night when the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association held its 100th awards banquet at the Hilton Hotel in Cherry Hill. Braving 20-degree temperatures more chilling because of a gusting wind, the earliest sellout crowd in association history responded with warm affection for notables Julius Erving, Bob Clarke, Billie Jean King, Carl Lewis, Tom Lasorda, Ken Hitchcock, Randy Ayers, John Chaney, Bill Bergey, Bernard Hopkins, Larry James and other sports heroes they cheered in the past.
SPORTS
December 26, 1997 | By Tyler Kepner, FOR THE INQUIRER
There's no truth to the rumor that Jim Taylor is buried under the artificial turf at Franklin Field. It just seems that way. It's been 37 years now since Taylor, a Hall of Fame fullback for the Green Bay Packers, got up. But, like Willie Wilson of the Kansas City Royals in his final, futile swing in the 1980 World Series, Taylor will always be down for the count in Philadelphia - frozen under Chuck Bednarik as the last seconds of a season disappear...
SPORTS
October 2, 2002 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the caller ID flashed "Charlie Bednarik," Bethlehem Catholic quarterback Adam Bednarik knew he was hearing from both a boyhood idol and a distant relative. Adam Bednarik grew up in Bethlehem, about a one-hour shot up the turnpike from Philadelphia, entranced by his father's stories about former Philadelphia Eagles center and linebacker Chuck Bednarik. His bone-rattling hits, bulldozing blocks, and blue-collar work ethic landed him in the Hall of Fame and in Adam's highest regard.
SPORTS
March 25, 2011 | Daily News Staff Report
Eagles legend Chuck Bednarik is expected to remain in a Lehigh Valley hospital for a few more days, according to his son-in-law, Ken Safarowic. Bednarik, 85, ate solid food yesterday and is continuing to undergo tests as doctors try to determine why he had shortness of breath and a drop in blood pressure and felt faint Tuesday. Safarowic had told the Daily News on Wednesday night that Bednarik has no ongoing conditions and he is "about as healthy as you can be at this stage" and doctors have determined his heart is OK. Safarowic reiterated that Bednarik is eager to get out of the hospital.
SPORTS
November 20, 2011 | By Jonathan Tannenwald, For The Inquirer
In Chuck Bednarik's opinion - which he is not afraid to offer - being honored with a statue is similar to taking a step toward sainthood. No wonder Bednarik was in such high spirits on Saturday afternoon. As a Franklin Field crowd that included many former teammates looked on, a 9-foot bronze statue of Bednarik was unveiled at halftime of the Penn-Cornell football game. "Statues are saints; they go to heaven. You're putting me in heaven while I'm still alive," Bednarik said.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011
Chuck Bednarik was released from St. Luke's Hospital near Bethlehem, Pa., on Tuesday night, a hospital spokesman confirmed Wednesday. The Eagles great was admitted after suffering shortness of breath last Tuesday. On Monday, Bednarik's son-in-law Ken Safarowic said the 85-year-old had been cleared to return home after a battery of tests found no major problems. Safarowic said that Bednarik had begun walking, but may initially need the assistance of a walker. A message left with Safarowic, who has been acting as spokesman for the Bednarik family, was not returned on Wednesday.
SPORTS
August 4, 1989 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
The NFL held a pep rally yesterday in front of the American Embassy. A couple of hundred people and a couple of television cameras witnessed this lunch-time spectacle on tony Grosvenor Square. Two things caught your eye: (1) The Eagles' cheerleaders. (2) An Eagles jersey bearing Chuck Bednarik's No. 60 that was hanging from an embassy window. "I figured that a jersey that had been retired ought to be displayed," said Jeff Garrison, the man who owns it and will be wearing it at Sunday's American Bowl game between the Eagles and the Cleveland Browns.
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SPORTS
March 28, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BETHLEHEM, Pa. - Despite a gray mist that clung to this city like grief, the South Bethlehem neighborhood where Chuck Bednarik grew up was visible from the second floor of Connell's Funeral Home on Thursday. Across a roiling Lehigh River, so too were the now-dormant smokestacks of the Bethlehem Steel foundry where the late Eagles legend's Slovak-born father had earned a hard living. Bethlehem said goodbye to Bednarik with a lengthy public viewing, a civic event that pointed out how much, at the end, Bednarik had in common with his faded industrial hometown.
SPORTS
March 24, 2015 | Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
I WAS 4 YEARS OLD and living in Virginia when the Eagles won the 1960 NFL championship, so I don't have any great memories of watching Chuck Bednarik play, as a center or a linebacker. But I do have a favorite Bednarik moment. It happened during the 50th anniversary celebration of that 1960 title. The team was hosting a dinner for the surviving vets, at the Linc. There was a red carpet outside, and players would emerge from cars to be greeted there by, among others, Swoop, the feathered mascot.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
ANYONE WHO grew up in the Philadelphia area, no matter when you happened to be born, knows about "the hit. " If you need additional explanation, you must be a newcomer (either that, or you watch the "Godfather" trilogy on a loop). "The hit," the only one truly worth talking about in mythic terms, is the one that Chuck Bednarik put on Frank Gifford in the game between the Eagles and the Giants at Yankee Stadium on Nov. 20, 1960. I was born a year and two weeks later. Yet although biology insists that I wasn't even conceived at the time when Gifford was impersonating a log, I feel that moment as if I'd watched it in real time.
SPORTS
March 23, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Most of the 68,000-plus fans who cram into Lincoln Financial Field on a given Sunday during the NFL season are too young to have any recollection of Chuck Bednarik's decorated playing career. They know, however, who he is, what he did, and what he meant to the Eagles. Is that not the ultimate sign of greatness? How many living athletes in this or any other city will be able to say that more than 50 years after their careers ended they were still remembered and revered? Here's a hint: You can cut off some fingers and still count the ones in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chuck Bednarik, the immovable, irascible son of a Bethlehem steelworker whose Hall of Fame football career was more notable for lasts than firsts, died Saturday morning following a brief illness. His family said Mr. Bednarik, 89, died in a Bucks County assisted-living facility. Perhaps the greatest player in the long histories of both the University of Pennsylvania and the Eagles, Mr. Bednarik starred on the last Penn teams to aspire to national prominence; was a veteran leader on the last Eagles team to win an NFL championship; and, most famously, was the last of the NFL's "60-minute men. " "With the passing of Chuck Bednarik, the Eagles and our fans have lost a legend," Eagles chairman and CEO Jeffrey Lurie said in a statement.
SPORTS
September 1, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
For many fans, the replica NFL jerseys they've been purchasing in ever-growing numbers since the 1990s are religious vestments. Donned with faith on Sundays, imbued with spiritual significance, their unique color and design reveal their wearers' sectarian leanings, their communion with fellow believers. Alter these sacred garments and you risk being tarred as a heretic. If Eagles supporters needed a reason to dislike Jeffrey Lurie - and this being Philadelphia, antipathy toward ownership is as natural a state as low expectations - he provided them with a solid one not long after purchasing the team in 1994.
SPORTS
August 12, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
They saved Chuck Bednarik's introduction for last. He emerged Sunday onto Franklin Field through a giant, inflatable Eagles helmet. Steadying himself on a walker, the 89-year-old could not reach out to shake hands as he passed the column of current Eagles. So they went to him. Eagles linebacker Connor Barwin leaned in and said a few words. The two stood just a few yards from the spot where Bednarik sat on Green Bay running back Jim Taylor as the clock expired in the 1960 NFL championship game.
SPORTS
August 12, 2014
THERE WAS no artificial turf or an inflatable plastic Eagles head for the players to run through onto the field, when the Birds won the 1960 NFL championship at Franklin Field, their home from 1958-70. But despite those differences, the bricks and concrete were the same yesterday, as the Eagles held their final public training-camp practice in front of a crowd of about 28,000 people, in the oldest stadium still being used for NCAA football, built on the Penn campus in 1895. Legends from the past were honored, and attendees included Chuck Bednarik, Pete Retzlaff and Jeremiah Trotter, among more than 30 others.
SPORTS
May 6, 2014
FIRST ROUND Van Buren? Third?: In his later years, Steve Van Buren would have this running comedy act with Chuck Bednarik. Van Buren was the Hall of Fame running back, the star of the Eagles' 1948 and '49 championship teams. Bednarik was a kid on the '49 team and the veteran who played both ways on the 1960 championship team. And so it went . . . Steve: You were the best. Chuck: No, you were the best. The conversation would continue, wander. Stories would be told and retold.
SPORTS
January 5, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades ago, when the Eagles rarely soared and the Saints were an unholy mess, the two franchises that will meet in Saturday night's NFC wild-card playoff made history. Until Philadelphia's generous first visit to New Orleans, on Nov. 5, 1967, the Saints, an expansion team midway through their inaugural season, had never experienced victory, never scored in the fourth quarter, never rushed for 100 yards. All that changed on a mild Sunday afternoon at Tulane Stadium, when the 0-7 Saints rode a Flea to their first-ever win. Walter "Flea" Roberts, an undersized running back they'd plucked off Cleveland's roster in the expansion draft, scored three diverse and entertaining touchdowns in New Orleans' landmark, 31-24 win. For Joe Kuharich's Eagles, the surprising loss to an expansion team was so dispiriting that they would win just twice in the season's second half and plummet into one of the deepest and longest lows in franchise history.
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