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Chuck Bednarik

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August 24, 2012 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer
STEVE Van Buren, the Hall of Fame running back who propelled the Eagles to the 1948 and '49 NFL titles, died Thursday evening in Lancaster of pneumonia at 91. Few fans alive today ever saw him play, but Van Buren might have been the best NFL player of the postwar '40s. Barroom historians like to debate whether Van Buren or center/linebacker Chuck Bednarik is the greatest Eagle of all time, with modern-era defensive end Reggie White polling well in some precincts. Certainly, Van Buren dominated his peers as no other skill-position Eagle ever has. Van Buren won four league rushing titles from 1945 to '49. To a franchise that has experienced so few championship celebrations - three, the most recent in 1960 - Van Buren was a cherished link through the years to the days when head coach Greasy Neale's Eagles were the undisputed class of the league.
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February 1, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com
THE EAGLES who won back-to-back world championships in the late 1940s were a rugged bunch of birds - and one of the toughest was their star receiver, No. 35, Pete Pihos. The son of Greek immigrants, hardened by serving in World War II's Battle of the Bulge under Gen. George Patton, Pihos dashed his way into the Pro Football Hall of Fame not so much for his ability to catch a long pass as the way he flattened defenders on the way to the end zone. Like many NFL greats of postwar years, Pihos then galloped into retirement and relative obscurity, ending up as a construction manager in North Carolina.
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November 20, 2011 | By Jonathan Tannenwald, For The Inquirer
In Chuck Bednarik's opinion - which he is not afraid to offer - being honored with a statue is similar to taking a step toward sainthood. No wonder Bednarik was in such high spirits on Saturday afternoon. As a Franklin Field crowd that included many former teammates looked on, a 9-foot bronze statue of Bednarik was unveiled at halftime of the Penn-Cornell football game. "Statues are saints; they go to heaven. You're putting me in heaven while I'm still alive," Bednarik said.
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November 18, 2011 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, barkowe@phillynews.com
IT HAS BEEN nearly 50 years since Chuck Bednarik last planted an opponent's face into the sod at Franklin Field, and yet his accomplishments have never been forgotten. As the greatest Eagles player of all time and the greatest college football player this city has ever seen, he's now going to be immortalized. Tomorrow, Concrete Charlie becomes Bronze Bednarik. A 7-foot bronzed statue of Bednarik will be unveiled during halftime of the Penn-Cornell game (1 p.m. kickoff). Bednarik played for the Quakers from 1945-48 and then went immediately to the Eagles with the No. 1 overall draft pick following his senior year.
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October 27, 2011 | BY DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
CHUCK BEDNARIK arrived on the University of Pennsylvania campus midway through the 1945 football season, not long after being discharged from the Army Air Corps. He had not played football for 3 years. Within 2 weeks, he was starting. The next 3 years, he started at center and linebacker in the days when Penn used to draw 70,000 to Franklin Field. With the first pick of 1949 NFL draft (actually held on Dec. 21, 1948, not long after Bednarik's final game at Penn), the Eagles chose Bednarik.
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August 16, 2011 | BY LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
BETHLEHEM - They filed past the tall, gaunt, old man in single file, most of the soldiers looking past him to the practice field ahead, where their clean, crisp uniforms were about to mingle with the muddy practice uniforms of the Eagles on Military Day at training camp. Every now and then, though, there was one who knew who the old man was, who would stop with an item to sign and a fervent wish to express, that the players of today were more like the white-haired fellow in the Pro Football Hall of Fame polo shirt, squinting through wire-rimmed glasses.
SPORTS
June 21, 2011
Eddie Khayat has called as many friends and former teammates of Chuck Bednarik as he can find to help with plans for a statue of the legendary Eagle at Franklin Field. Now, Khayat, a lineman on the 1960 NFL championship team, is turning to you. "I always felt that the Eagles fans were part of the team," Khayat said. "There were 67,000 fans at the 1960 championship game. If there are 15,000 of those fans still with us, and if we could get everyone to contribute $1, it would go a long way to help.
SPORTS
June 6, 2011
The back-page story in Friday's Daily News was about the organized effort to raise enough money to construct a statue of Penn and Eagles great Chuck Bednarik, which would be placed at Franklin Field, where he starred in college and in the NFL. That made us wonder which other Philadelphia sports legend might be deserving of a statue beyond those already immortalized. The results of a reader poll conducted on philly.com show that 27.8 percent of respondents thought Bob Clarke should be honored with a statue, followed by 20.6 percent for Smokin' Joe Frazier and 13.6 percent for Reggie White.
SPORTS
June 3, 2011 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
NO ONE LIVES forever, but some would say that the closest thing to immortality for sports heroes is to have their likeness cast in bronze. Less than a month ago, a statue of former middleweight champion Joey Giardello was unveiled in South Philadelphia. The next legendary Philly athlete to be so honored is likely to be Penn and Eagles great Chuck Bednarik, a former center and linebacker who is called the last of the 60-minute men. If and when the necessary money is raised and the oft-discussed project is completed, the Bednarik statue would be placed at Franklin Field as the centerpiece of a proposed sports museum that includes a large mural that pays tribute not only to the Quakers' football past, but to the days when the Eagles also called the 116-year-old stadium their home.
SPORTS
April 21, 2011
HAD A call the other day from a reader asking about Chuck Bednarik. The guy, who didn't identify himself, just wanted to pass along a note to Bednarik, who had a recent hospital stay after experiencing shortness of breath and feeling faint. Bednarik has much of his strength back, says son-in-law Ken Safarowic, and appreciates all the well-wishes he's received. If you'd like to pass along a note to Bednarik, send it to us here at the Daily News and we'll make sure he gets it. Our address: Daily News Sports Dept., c/o Chuck Bednarik, 400 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA 19130.
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