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Chuck Bednarik

SPORTS
February 9, 2010 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first time Pat Summerall met Tom Brookshier, at Franklin Field, it was a violent greeting. "He just about split my face mask away from my helmet," Summerall said yesterday, eulogizing his friend and longtime broadcast partner at a memorial service at the Ardmore Presbyterian Church. Brookshier, 78, died Jan. 29 after a battle with cancer. At a memorial service filled with local and national sports luminaries, eulogies were given for the former Eagles star defensive back by his friends Summerall, Dick Vermeil, Jack Whitaker, and Billy Cunningham, as well as Brookshier's daughter Betsy.
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Brookshier, according to his friends, knew how to tackle. Whether on the football field or as a television and radio personality, his impact was equally immense and intense. He was an all-pro on the last Eagles team to win an NFL championship, in 1960, and was part of CBS's top NFL broadcast team during the 1970s along with his close friend Pat Summerall. In the late 1980s he hired Angelo Cataldi, launching the 610 WIP sports-talk format that remains in place today. Mr. Brookshier, 78, died Friday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital.
SPORTS
January 11, 2009 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
   Even for two teams that have played each other 151 times since 1933, the Eagles and Giants have manufactured an awful lot of memorable moments. This rivalry has had a little of everything. Wild wins and wild wind. Heartbreaking losses and backbreaking hits. Acrobatic touchdowns and clownish play-calls. Record punts and record reversals.    It was the Giants who thumped the Eagles in Philadelphia's first NFL game, 56-0 on Oct. 15, 1933. It was Buddy Ryan's Eagles who beat Bill Parcells' powerful Giants five of six times from 1988 to 1990, a three-year span when the Giants were a combined 38-14.
SPORTS
January 9, 2009 | by Frank Seravalli
GREAT MOMENTS are born from great opportunity. Or so they say. Situated just 90 miles apart, the sports teams from Philadelphia and New York have had plenty of them. Here are some memorable moments, Philadelphia vs. New York: 1. Chuck Bednarik knocks out Frank Gifford - Nov. 20, 1960. Concrete Charlie says that it was like any other. But because of Frank Gifford's stature, the opponent, and the severity of the outcome - it is one that will live forever. "It was one of those typically tough games between the Giants and Eagles in the middle of November," Bednarik explained to Football Digest . "He was doing a down-and-in pattern, and I saw him coming; I just hit him high in the chest about as hard as I could.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
Who was the greatest Eagle of all time? We asked a panel of former players across several eras to vote, and it was an incredibly tight race. Chuck Bednarik, all agreed, was a solid No. 3. But No. 1? Steve Van Buren or Reggie White? It was close. The deciding factor in selecting Van Buren over White was their postseason records. Van Buren won two championships, while White won only one playoff game as an Eagle. Everyone agreed White revolutionized the way the defensive end position was played.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
1 Steve Van Buren. The best ever. How do you judge? How do you cross eras and compare? Just what is universal, what is the tipping point, what is the criteria for such an honor as being named the best ever for a franchise that has existed for more than seven decades? Championships. When it comes down to it, the game of football is about winning championships, and no one was more instrumental in bringing not one, but two championships to the city of Philadelphia than Steve Van Buren.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
It was the dimming of an era for the Philadelphia Eagles, although few would have guessed it on that mild December afternoon in Franklin Field, and a final throwback moment for the NFL, a league edging toward the cusp of the modern age. If one player on that day symbolized the passage soon to take place, it was Chuck Bednarik of the Eagles, a square brute from the hard hills of the Lehigh Valley who played both center and linebacker, every play, as...
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
7 Pete Pihos. His opposition was a kid, some poor rookie who wasn't used to Pete Pihos' pirouettes and pivots. During a training camp practice in 1954, Pihos embarrassed the rookie after he somehow broke free, corralled the football, and dashed downfield for a touchdown. "Don't let that bother you, son," Eagles coach Jim Trimble said. "Pete can do that to any back in this league. " Certainly in his day, Pihos was the most feared wide receiver - or end - in the NFL. A fullback at Indiana, Pihos was the Eagles' third-round pick in 1945, and went on to play for the Birds from 1947 until 1955, when he retired at the age of 32 to focus on his day job as a salesman.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
3 Chuck Bednarik. In 1960, plenty of players in the NFL might have thought they could play both ways, but one did, and excelled. Chuck Bednarik was the last iron man of pro football. When linebacker Bob Pellegrini pulled a groin muscle against Cleveland in the fifth game of the season, coach Buck Shaw looked at the 35-year-old Bednarik and said, "Get in there, Chuck, but don't pull any hero stuff. " Because he played both ways to help lead the Eagles to the 1960 world championship - the franchise's last - Bednarik solidified his spot among the greatest Eagles of all time.
SPORTS
September 17, 2006 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In three weeks, you-know-who comes back to town, which means you-know-what is going to be coming out of the mouths of Philadelphia fans. With Terrell Owens wearing a silver helmet and a blue star, the Eagles' rivalry with the Dallas Cowboys figures to be more intense than ever. Truth be told, though, the Eagles' better and more bitter adversary will be at Lincoln Financial Field today. It can easily be argued that the Eagles and New York Giants have engaged in the best NFL rivalry of the 21st century.
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