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Chuck Bednarik

SPORTS
January 9, 2009 | by Frank Seravalli
GREAT MOMENTS are born from great opportunity. Or so they say. Situated just 90 miles apart, the sports teams from Philadelphia and New York have had plenty of them. Here are some memorable moments, Philadelphia vs. New York: 1. Chuck Bednarik knocks out Frank Gifford - Nov. 20, 1960. Concrete Charlie says that it was like any other. But because of Frank Gifford's stature, the opponent, and the severity of the outcome - it is one that will live forever. "It was one of those typically tough games between the Giants and Eagles in the middle of November," Bednarik explained to Football Digest . "He was doing a down-and-in pattern, and I saw him coming; I just hit him high in the chest about as hard as I could.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
Who was the greatest Eagle of all time? We asked a panel of former players across several eras to vote, and it was an incredibly tight race. Chuck Bednarik, all agreed, was a solid No. 3. But No. 1? Steve Van Buren or Reggie White? It was close. The deciding factor in selecting Van Buren over White was their postseason records. Van Buren won two championships, while White won only one playoff game as an Eagle. Everyone agreed White revolutionized the way the defensive end position was played.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
3 Chuck Bednarik. In 1960, plenty of players in the NFL might have thought they could play both ways, but one did, and excelled. Chuck Bednarik was the last iron man of pro football. When linebacker Bob Pellegrini pulled a groin muscle against Cleveland in the fifth game of the season, coach Buck Shaw looked at the 35-year-old Bednarik and said, "Get in there, Chuck, but don't pull any hero stuff. " Because he played both ways to help lead the Eagles to the 1960 world championship - the franchise's last - Bednarik solidified his spot among the greatest Eagles of all time.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
1 Steve Van Buren. The best ever. How do you judge? How do you cross eras and compare? Just what is universal, what is the tipping point, what is the criteria for such an honor as being named the best ever for a franchise that has existed for more than seven decades? Championships. When it comes down to it, the game of football is about winning championships, and no one was more instrumental in bringing not one, but two championships to the city of Philadelphia than Steve Van Buren.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
It was the dimming of an era for the Philadelphia Eagles, although few would have guessed it on that mild December afternoon in Franklin Field, and a final throwback moment for the NFL, a league edging toward the cusp of the modern age. If one player on that day symbolized the passage soon to take place, it was Chuck Bednarik of the Eagles, a square brute from the hard hills of the Lehigh Valley who played both center and linebacker, every play, as...
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
7 Pete Pihos. His opposition was a kid, some poor rookie who wasn't used to Pete Pihos' pirouettes and pivots. During a training camp practice in 1954, Pihos embarrassed the rookie after he somehow broke free, corralled the football, and dashed downfield for a touchdown. "Don't let that bother you, son," Eagles coach Jim Trimble said. "Pete can do that to any back in this league. " Certainly in his day, Pihos was the most feared wide receiver - or end - in the NFL. A fullback at Indiana, Pihos was the Eagles' third-round pick in 1945, and went on to play for the Birds from 1947 until 1955, when he retired at the age of 32 to focus on his day job as a salesman.
SPORTS
September 17, 2006 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In three weeks, you-know-who comes back to town, which means you-know-what is going to be coming out of the mouths of Philadelphia fans. With Terrell Owens wearing a silver helmet and a blue star, the Eagles' rivalry with the Dallas Cowboys figures to be more intense than ever. Truth be told, though, the Eagles' better and more bitter adversary will be at Lincoln Financial Field today. It can easily be argued that the Eagles and New York Giants have engaged in the best NFL rivalry of the 21st century.
NEWS
February 9, 2005
I'M NOT old enough to have seen Chuck Bednarik in his glory. My father and grandfather told stories about big, bad Chuck - the meanest, nastiest two-way player to ever don Eagle green. But after having seen recent pre-game interviews and reading about his feeling about the Eagles' Super Bowl run, the only image I now have is that of a washed-up miserable old whiner: "Jeff Laurie wouldn't buy my book for the team . . . Wahhhhh!!!" Hey, Chuck, get over it, you big crybaby! You should have just let this generation of Eagle fans enjoy what might be the greatest season and arguably greatest teams this city has ever had without your miserable self-serving whining.
NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the wacky world of championship-craving Eagles enthusiasts, the Rozanskis of Glassboro rest near the top of the heap. They not only bleed Eagles green, but for 50 years and three generations they've also inhaled it, chewed it and absorbed it through their pores. They own season tickets. They tailgate, collect memorabilia, and try to schedule family events around games. When they did have to attend a church wedding during an Eagles game, they took a television. None of which makes them unique among the legions of never-say-die Eagles addicts who endure season after season of tears, fears, jeers and cheers.
SPORTS
January 27, 2004 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Neither an angry Chuck Bednarik nor an AWOL Harry Kalas dimmed the enthusiasm last night when the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association held its 100th awards banquet at the Hilton Hotel in Cherry Hill. Braving 20-degree temperatures more chilling because of a gusting wind, the earliest sellout crowd in association history responded with warm affection for notables Julius Erving, Bob Clarke, Billie Jean King, Carl Lewis, Tom Lasorda, Ken Hitchcock, Randy Ayers, John Chaney, Bill Bergey, Bernard Hopkins, Larry James and other sports heroes they cheered in the past.
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