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Chuck Leavell

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is feeling great. Tuesday's Rolling Stones concert was so fine. Friday's is coming up. And Leavell, the band's keyboard player for 31 years, is loving it all. But for now, a brief breather on a sunny afternoon, he's talking trees. That's his other life, his twin passion. He has a 2,500-acre Georgia forest plantation near Macon, and he has become a staunch advocate for the idea that using the nation's trees is what will save them. It will help people recognize their value.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The Rolling Stones will begin their 1989-90 "Steel Wheels" U.S. tour at Veterans Stadium in late August, a spokesman for local promoter Electric Factory Concerts confirmed last night. Word that agreement had been reached came after two weeks of negotiations among Electric Factory, the City of Philadelphia and representatives of the Rolling Stones. An announcement is expected Monday of specific performance dates and times, ticket-sales information and other details. "At least at this point, we can announce the most important point: The Rolling Stones are coming to Philadelphia," Electric Factory attorney Alan C. Kessler said yesterday evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rolling Stones' Steel Wheels tour came to its just conclusion in Atlantic City last night, not with a screeching halt, but with a relaxed, good-natured locomotion that suggested this train could keep on running well into the 1990s. Lower keyed and friendlier than Tuesday night's performance carried to a few million pay-per-view TV homes, the Stones grimaced less and grooved more. A looser and more likable Mick Jagger let his enunciation slide and his harmonica solos linger on, while the rowdy Ron Wood and Keith Richards played their guitars the way they drink their booze - hanging in several times for "one more round.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | The Atlanta Constitution, Chicago Tribune and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
STONES KEYBOARDIST GROWS TREES IN HIS OFFSTAGE LIFE Didja know that Chuck Leavell, playing keyboards with the Rolling Stones during their "Voodoo Lounge" tour, which stopped at Veterans Stadium last night and will again tonight, is a celebrity among the Smokey Bear set? Seems Leavell owns a 1,500-acre plantation near Macon, Ga., where he grows trees. In fact, Leavell is such a successful forester that this tree-friendly state named him tree farmer of the year last year. Between playing gigs with the Stones (and formerly with the Allman Brothers and Eric Clapton, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
One thing you can say about the Rolling Stones at midlife: They sure look more decrepit than the Who. The Stones, whose first album in three years is due out in August, met the press yesterday at Grand Central Terminal to announce that they'll hit the U.S. concert circuit in September for the first time since 1981. The "Steel Wheels Tour" - taken from the new album's title - will stop in 29 North American cities, including Philadelphia. By the time it ends in December, approximately 3 million fans are expected to have seen them.
NEWS
December 16, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
   NEWARK, N.J. - Golden anniversaries are rarer in rock-and-roll bands than marriages, so maybe it's the momentousness of the occasion that's spurring on the Rolling Stones during the five-show London-New York-New Jersey run with which they are marking their 50th year in show business. Whatever the motivation, one thing is certain: At the Prudential Center in Newark on Thursday, from the "Get Off of My Cloud" start to the "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" finish, the Stones sounded great.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Derrik J. Lang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - For one night only, the Rolling Stones were an up-and-coming band again. The legendary group rocked a small club in Los Angeles on Saturday night for a minuscule crowd compared with the thousands set to see them launch their "50 and Counting" anniversary tour on Friday at the Staples Center. (The North American leg of the tour ends at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on June 18 and 21.) The band started off Saturday's hush-hush 90-minute concert at the Echoplex in the hip Echo Park neighborhood with "You Got Me Rocking" before catapulting into a mix of new and old material, as well as their bluesy covers of classics from Otis Redding ("That's How Strong My Love Is")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It was billed as a peek inside the engine room of the rock-and-roll ship of state. The Rolling Stones' "No Security" arena tour, which opened a two-night run at the First Union Center on Monday, offered the rare chance to see the band known for outlandish, stadium-sized spectacles perform in a (comparatively) intimate setting. There were no risque inflatables to accompany "Honky Tonk Woman. " No fireworks. Little in the way of fancy staging. Just a simple terrace, tiered in an arc around drummer Charlie Watts, with Mick Jagger's wardrobe hanging on a rack in plain sight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is the unoffical musical conductor of the Rolling Stones, counting off at least half the numbers and cueing the group with head nods and hand signals. He's also the Southern-fried soul of the Stones, fleshing out the gritty Delta spirit of "Midnight Rambler" and "Honky Tonk Woman" with torrents of bluesy notes and rumbling barrelhouse jazz chords. You won't see him in the Rolling Stones' core group photos. But, since 1982, Leavell has been an integral part of their projects - including the "Undercover of the Night," "Dirty Work" and "Steel Wheels" albums, Keith Richards' sideline projects like the Chuck Berry tribute film "Hail, Hail Rock and Roll" and Mick's collaboration with Aretha Franklin on "Jumping Jack Flash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It's unlikely many Rolling Stones fans strolled out of the Vet last night singing "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" or "You Can't Always Get What You Want. " After 28 solid songs (including those two) over 2 1/2 hours, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ron Wood and Bill Wyman had left virtually no - umm - stones unturned. And they left this reporter reassured that the Rolling Stones remain, in their middlin' years, at least one of the greatest rock 'n' roll bands in the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is feeling great. Tuesday's Rolling Stones concert was so fine. Friday's is coming up. And Leavell, the band's keyboard player for 31 years, is loving it all. But for now, a brief breather on a sunny afternoon, he's talking trees. That's his other life, his twin passion. He has a 2,500-acre Georgia forest plantation near Macon, and he has become a staunch advocate for the idea that using the nation's trees is what will save them. It will help people recognize their value.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Derrik J. Lang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - For one night only, the Rolling Stones were an up-and-coming band again. The legendary group rocked a small club in Los Angeles on Saturday night for a minuscule crowd compared with the thousands set to see them launch their "50 and Counting" anniversary tour on Friday at the Staples Center. (The North American leg of the tour ends at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on June 18 and 21.) The band started off Saturday's hush-hush 90-minute concert at the Echoplex in the hip Echo Park neighborhood with "You Got Me Rocking" before catapulting into a mix of new and old material, as well as their bluesy covers of classics from Otis Redding ("That's How Strong My Love Is")
NEWS
December 16, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
   NEWARK, N.J. - Golden anniversaries are rarer in rock-and-roll bands than marriages, so maybe it's the momentousness of the occasion that's spurring on the Rolling Stones during the five-show London-New York-New Jersey run with which they are marking their 50th year in show business. Whatever the motivation, one thing is certain: At the Prudential Center in Newark on Thursday, from the "Get Off of My Cloud" start to the "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" finish, the Stones sounded great.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It's the end of another 10-hour day of rehearsals for the Rolling Stones, and Keith Richards is having his doubts. He's worried that the world's most famous rock-and-roll band - whose concert at Veterans Stadium tonight will be the first of three area performances in five days - has finally bitten off more than it can chew. For several months, he and songwriting partner Mick Jagger have pored over 40 years of music-making, preparing for a tour that requires them to put on different shows depending on whether they're in stadiums, arenas or theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It was billed as a peek inside the engine room of the rock-and-roll ship of state. The Rolling Stones' "No Security" arena tour, which opened a two-night run at the First Union Center on Monday, offered the rare chance to see the band known for outlandish, stadium-sized spectacles perform in a (comparatively) intimate setting. There were no risque inflatables to accompany "Honky Tonk Woman. " No fireworks. Little in the way of fancy staging. Just a simple terrace, tiered in an arc around drummer Charlie Watts, with Mick Jagger's wardrobe hanging on a rack in plain sight.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | The Atlanta Constitution, Chicago Tribune and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
STONES KEYBOARDIST GROWS TREES IN HIS OFFSTAGE LIFE Didja know that Chuck Leavell, playing keyboards with the Rolling Stones during their "Voodoo Lounge" tour, which stopped at Veterans Stadium last night and will again tonight, is a celebrity among the Smokey Bear set? Seems Leavell owns a 1,500-acre plantation near Macon, Ga., where he grows trees. In fact, Leavell is such a successful forester that this tree-friendly state named him tree farmer of the year last year. Between playing gigs with the Stones (and formerly with the Allman Brothers and Eric Clapton, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rolling Stones' Steel Wheels tour came to its just conclusion in Atlantic City last night, not with a screeching halt, but with a relaxed, good-natured locomotion that suggested this train could keep on running well into the 1990s. Lower keyed and friendlier than Tuesday night's performance carried to a few million pay-per-view TV homes, the Stones grimaced less and grooved more. A looser and more likable Mick Jagger let his enunciation slide and his harmonica solos linger on, while the rowdy Ron Wood and Keith Richards played their guitars the way they drink their booze - hanging in several times for "one more round.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is the unoffical musical conductor of the Rolling Stones, counting off at least half the numbers and cueing the group with head nods and hand signals. He's also the Southern-fried soul of the Stones, fleshing out the gritty Delta spirit of "Midnight Rambler" and "Honky Tonk Woman" with torrents of bluesy notes and rumbling barrelhouse jazz chords. You won't see him in the Rolling Stones' core group photos. But, since 1982, Leavell has been an integral part of their projects - including the "Undercover of the Night," "Dirty Work" and "Steel Wheels" albums, Keith Richards' sideline projects like the Chuck Berry tribute film "Hail, Hail Rock and Roll" and Mick's collaboration with Aretha Franklin on "Jumping Jack Flash.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Smile, stick out your tongue, say cheese. Great! Whirrr - OK, here are some Polaroids from the Rolling Stones' tour across America, as told by band members: TICKETS, PLEASE From Republican Party national chairman and amateur blues guitarist Lee Atwater in Washington, D.C., to tennis master Jimmy Connors in St. Louis - celebrity visitors invariably show up at Stones gigs. You wanna know how these people get tickets when you stood in the cold and walked away empty-handed? Magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It's unlikely many Rolling Stones fans strolled out of the Vet last night singing "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" or "You Can't Always Get What You Want. " After 28 solid songs (including those two) over 2 1/2 hours, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ron Wood and Bill Wyman had left virtually no - umm - stones unturned. And they left this reporter reassured that the Rolling Stones remain, in their middlin' years, at least one of the greatest rock 'n' roll bands in the world.
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