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NEWS
July 23, 1995 | For The Inquirer / JERRY TRITT
Members of Our Lady of Good Counsel Church in Moorestown peeked into the past - through the church building's cornerstone box. They got a blurry view - water had damaged some items. The box was opened at a service July 14, when the church kicked off the building's 100th-anniversary celebration. It will last 15 months - the time it took to raise the building, now 99.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | For The Inquirer / DAVID J. JACKSON
St. Agnes Roman Catholic Church held a walk Wednesday as part of its 200th- anniversary celebration. John Gerding-Oresic (left), dressed as John Hannum, and Joe Carroll, dressed as Daniel Fitzpatrick, led the marchers from the Friends School to the church on West Gay Street. Hannum donated the land for the church, and Fitzpatrick was one of the original trustees.
NEWS
August 14, 1995 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
The Philadelphia Tabernacle at 206 E. Wister St. reopened yesterday after being closed for renovations. The Haitian Interdenominational Choir of Brooklyn, N.Y., (left) celebrated the dedication ceremony in song. Below, Dickson Guillanme, the choir director, is silhouetted in the window of the church as he leads the singers.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
THE CHURCH OF the Assumption won another reprieve Tuesday. The city's Board of Licenses & Inspections Review sent the case back to the Philadelphia Historical Commission and asked it to weigh in on the latest appeal from activists trying to save the historic church from the wrecking ball. Samuel Stretton, attorney for a community group, told the board that the owner, John Wei, should have to go before the Historical Commission just as the previous owner did. But the board stopped short of requiring the commission to have a new hearing based on new ownership.
NEWS
June 28, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Christ Temple A.M.E. Zion Church in Willingboro, which has had a troubled past, will hold rededication services Sunday to help it heal. Bishop Marshall Strickland, who oversees African Methodist Episcopal churches in New Jersey and parts of Pennsylvania and New York, will officiate at the 11 a.m. service at the church, 2999 John F. Kennedy Way. Also officiating will be the church's pastor, the Rev. Louis Richardson. At 4 p.m., there will be a worship service and civic day to introduce the reconstructed church to the community.
NEWS
May 2, 2005
TO LETTER-writer Anthony Frascino: Your comments, and those of others that feel as you do, really get under my skin. Are you Catholic? If so, why do you feel it is "necessary" for the church to change? If you are not Catholic, maybe you should take some time to learn about Catholicism. Catholicism is based on the teachings of Jesus, yet you are suggesting that we simply cast aside these beliefs in an effort to "adjust to the new global concerns. " And what, by the way, do you mean by "global concerns"?
NEWS
April 9, 2007
WHILE I FEEL that it is important for the Enon church to be involved in the community, their involvement should not pose a direct inconvenience to the residents where their establishment is located. As a resident of Mount Airy, I was appalled by the lack of consideration given to the community in terms of parking. I am not a member of Enon and chose to go to my own church on the Sunday that Bishop T.D. Jakes was there, only to return that evening to find that there was no parking within blocks of my home due to the all-day service.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the eve of Holy Week for the spring-cleaning crew at St. Helena's in Olney, a group of parishioners on a mission to deliver a near-spotless church for the most important week on the Christian calendar. So while the Vietnamese women's group prayed downstairs, a funeral of a onetime Anglo member concluded in the lower church, and the Spanish-language choir prepared for rehearsal, Joseph Mensah stopped polishing the floors long enough to talk about how the church helped him after he emigrated from Ghana.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
St. Augustine's Church at Fourth and Pine is whole again. The city's fourth-oldest Catholic church lost its steeple in a 1992 storm. A newly constructed one assumed its place atop the church yesterday.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / ANDREW EINHORN
The works of 40 artists are being spotlighted at an exhibit at the All Hallows Episcopal Church on Greenwood Avenue at Bent Road in Wyncote. The exhibit is being held in the parish hall of the church, on Greenwood Avenue at Bent Road.
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NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Terrence Griffith, pastor of the oldest black Baptist church in Pennsylvania, was sweating in the early-morning heat. Alone in the cavernous sanctuary of First African Baptist Church, he lamented the lack of air-conditioning. Outside, a chain-link fence protected pedestrians from a church wall that he said could collapse at any moment. The church, Griffith said, can no longer handle the burden of its 109-year-old building at 16th and Christian Streets. "I'm not going to preside over the death of a church," he said.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of four national groups representing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Catholics has been told it cannot use space it had been promised at a Catholic church in Center City for alternative workshops and gatherings next month during the World Meeting of Families. So the coalition, known as Equally Blessed, is turning to the Methodists. Equally Blessed had secured the use of St. John the Evangelist Church's parish center at 12th and Ludlow Streets this spring, said Francis DeBernardo, head of the Maryland-based New Ways Ministry, one of the groups in the coalition.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Susanne Cassidy caught a train downtown from Wynnewood, leaving enough time to make her way through the midday heat to the offices of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. She wanted to be there Monday to support her friend Margie Winters. Winters, of course, was fired as director of religious education at Waldron Mercy Academy in June after the archdiocese learned of her same-sex marriage. Cassidy has known Winters and her wife, Andrea, for years from Mass at St. Vincent de Paul in Germantown - a haven for liberal-minded Catholics across the city.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission has unanimously designated as historic the frescoes of St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, the oldest of their kind in this country. They were painted in 1848, one year after the church, at 243 N. Lawrence St., alongside the Ben Franklin Bridge, was rebuilt. It was burned down during anti-Catholic riots in 1844, a time when Irish immigrants largely made up its thousands of parishioners. It's remarkable, historians say, that the frescoes have survived to the present day. "The Lord Seeth," inscribed above a massive fresco depicting the Crucifixion, appears at the front altar of the Old City church, built in a style reminiscent of Roman cathedrals.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
M. Kelly Tillery was a 24-year-old recent Penn law graduate in September 1979 when he heard Mayor Frank Rizzo announce on the evening news that he would build a huge cylindrical platform atop Logan Square, for Pope John Paul II to say Mass. Tillery couldn't believe what he was hearing. By funding the platform for a Mass, Rizzo wasn't separating church and state - he was marrying them. Tillery stayed up all night drafting a federal lawsuit against Philadelphia over what he considered its blatant violation of the First Amendment's Establishment Clause.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia Hackett Gilmore inherited the nondenominational Wiley Church in Marlton from her father, the Rev. John S. Hackett, who had become pastor of its predecessor, Wiley Methodist Church, in Camden in 1927. He founded the Wiley Mission in Camden in 1931, and moved it and its church in 1940 to Marlton "to dedicate all of its efforts in health care to the aging and frail elderly," the church website states. Mrs. Gilmore and her husband, Cecil P. Sr. led the mission from the death of her father in 1940 until they retired in 1980, son Gary said.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 100 congregants of Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in South Philadelphia marched in Sunday's swelter to the church's former burial ground to protest the arrest and subsequent death of Sandra Bland in a Texas jail. Bland, 28, of Naperville, a suburb of Chicago, was driving through Wallace County, Texas, to begin a new job as a student ambassador at Prairie View A&M University, from which she graduated in 2009. She was arrested and jailed, police say, after she assaulted an officer during a traffic stop.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Sundays, the members of Keystone Fellowship church attend services together and apart, in one building and in several, hearing the same message, but differently. Keystone is a multisite congregation: one church with a centralized leadership but a congregation that meets in more than one location. It hosts services in three Montgomery County towns - Montgomeryville, Fort Washington, and Skippack - with a fourth in the works. "Instead of being one megasite of 2,000, we'd rather be four churches with 500 - and be active in those communities," Pastor John Cope said.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John M. Moon, 94, of Rosemont, a chocolate-company executive, churchman, sailor, and motorcyclist into his 80s, died Friday, July 3, at his home of causes due to aging. His life centered on service to Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church and successive careers at Whitman's Chocolates and Godiva Chocolatier. A cheerful presence, Mr. Moon, known as "Jack," was loved by family and neighbors, churchgoers, and the merchants with whom he did business. "His sense of humor in regaling hilarious stories was contagious to all around him," his family said in a tribute.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marianna J. Emanuele taught in Philadelphia schools as a nun with the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. A brother, John Emanuele, said she then left convent life "because she wanted to do more, more than just teaching. She wanted to reach out to people. " So, he said, from 1983 to 1993, she worked as a civilian missionary in Kenya. "She was teaching women that were going to have children how to take care of them," he said.
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