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Church Bells

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NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council has spoken: The bell at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Manayunk most likely won't be silenced. "You are preaching to the choir," Majority Leader Marian B. Tasco told a neighboring minister who argued in favor of St. John's bell ringing at a hearing Tuesday by Council's Committee on Public Health and Human Services. On Thursday, the full Council will consider the legislation, which would exempt churches and schools from Philadelphia's noise ordinance. A final vote could occur next Thursday.
NEWS
September 11, 2002 | By Marcy Webster
At 8:45 a.m. today the bells of First Presbyterian Church in Haddonfield will begin to toll. For three to four hours, the bells will sound once for every life lost in the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 one year ago. In a re-creation of last year's moving ceremony, a line of solemn people, young and old, will climb the stairs to the tower to ring the bell. Each person will pause at the entrance to the belfry; then, as the name of a victim of the terrorist attacks is read aloud, the next ringer will move forward, grasp the rope, and pull.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The church can keep playing its music and Leonard Doyle can keep singing the blues. That was the word yesterday from Commonwealth Court to Doyle, the Wyoming County man who said bell music blaring from the church next door was driving him bonkers. Doyle, of Nicholson, went to court to try to get local officials to enforce the borough's nuisance ordinance and forbid St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church from piping the recorded music from amplifiers at 7 a.m., noon, 12:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Doyle, a retired contractor in his 60s, told the court that he suffers from "labile diabetes mellitus, degenerative disc disease, vascular disease, arthritis and stress-related maladies" and that the bell music interfered with his sleep and caused him "undue stress.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a stone tower, the notes rolled over Locust Street yesterday, tumbling to earth in a cascade that reminded passersby of those moments that nothing but bells can properly commemorate - the beginning of a century, perhaps, or the end of a war. And now, at St. Mark's Church, the bells commemorate themselves, and the resumption of a Sabbath tradition that had been dormant for more than a century. For the first time in 123 years, the church on the 1600 block of Locust Street tolled its bells the way they were meant to be rung - a process known as a change ringing.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At midnight Sunday, Gregory Jaskolka wants Philadelphia to ring in the New Year with bells, not bullets. He wants church bells to ring so loudly that they will drown out the din of celebratory gunfire that makes some city neighborhoods sound like war zones. His hope is that the illegal practice of discharging weapons will end if no one can hear the shots. Two years ago, Jaskolka's son, Joe, was struck in the head by a stray bullet fired by a New Year's reveler in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a bagpiper played "Amazing Grace," John Redmond's buddies lifted his flag-draped coffin onto Ladder Truck No. 11. Then they strapped him down for a hero's last ride. Only last Friday, Redmond and the rest of Ladder Company 11, at 12th and Reed Streets, had ridden this same 100-foot aerial ladder truck to a fire at Rising Sun Baptist Church, 12th and Fitzwater Streets. Redmond, 41, of Holmesburg, a 17-year veteran of the Philadelphia Fire Department, didn't make it back.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
The three pieces that made up the William Kapell Memorial Concert last night at the Mann Music Center by the Philadelphia Orchestra and conductor David Zinman played out like an essay on the many ways a composer can use dissonance. For Richard Strauss, a composer who went as far with atonality by the middle of his life as he would ever go (with the wicked tale of Elektra), clashing notes meant evil and uncertainty. To Sergei Prokofiev, the use of dissonance meant violence, and sometimes humor.
NEWS
April 15, 2007 | By Paul Lepard FOR THE INQUIRER
My wife and I took a 30-day vacation to Switzerland, and yes, we certainly were enthralled with its scenic beauty. But when we dug deeper into the customs and way of life of these industrious citizens, we found a society that is a bit gentler than we are used to here in the United States. Here are five examples of this kinder society - maybe we could adopt some of them? Church bells. Church bells in every village, town and city toll the hour of the day. In addition, at 6 p.m. Saturday, all churches, regardless of denomination, ring their bells for 15 minutes to remind citizens to stop and prepare for Sunday and to give thanks for all the good things in life.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FED UP WITH CHURCH BELLS, WOMAN TAKES AX TO BELFRY Ask not Midge Mather for whom the bell tolls - truth be told, it's tolled once too often for her. Fed up with visitors ringing the church bells in the picturesque western England town of Compton Bassett, she took an ax to the 500-year-old church door this weekend and chopped down the belfry ropes. Mather's family has lived in Compton Bassett almost as long as St. Swithun's church has been there - 400 years - and she said she felt remorse for what she did. But she also felt that, after repeated pleas to church elders over the years, she could no longer take the bells pealing 100 yards from her home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
Carrie Underwood won the fourth season of American Idol back in 2005, but five superperforming LPs, a pile of Grammys, and numerous unforgettable singles later, you could argue that the 32-year-old sweetheart from Oklahoma is bigger than the show that gave her her start (as well as most of the other winners). She's the crossover country artist that could - à la Shania Twain, Taylor Swift, and Faith Hill. Last fall's Storyteller is just as charming as the rest of her discography - folksy, twangy, and hewing to some classic country tropes: trucks, jealousy, gossip, and revenge.
NEWS
November 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS A boy growing up in Virginia, Lee Mason had a vision: He saw himself ringing the bells atop the Baptist Church that he attended. Lee got to ring the bells, all right, then went on to ring many bells throughout a long life as a Baptist preacher in Philadelphia. He was also a longtime warrior in the civil-rights movement in the days of the 1960s when to march in certain communities of the South was to risk life and limb. Lee Mason Jr., who marched arm-in-arm with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jesse Jackson and other legendary civil-rights leaders, a preacher whose lusty baritone could belt out a gospel song to stir the heart, an Army veteran and devoted family man, died Saturday of prostate cancer.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
Daylight Saving Time may be hazardous to your health. We're not kidding. When you're resetting your clocks this Sunday you may want to keep this in mind. According to a study published in 2009 , the number of workplace injuries goes up the Monday after time springs forward. Behavioral scientists Christopher M. Barnes and David Wagner, who conducted the study, call the effects of DST a "clear and present danger. " They analyzed reports of injuries of mine workers over 23 years.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wednesday will be a homecoming for Bishop Richard Franklin Norris as he steps, surely to applause, to the podium of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church. As pastor in the 1980s of this historic congregation — the "mother" church of the five million-member denomination founded here 218 years ago — Norris restored the landmark building and transformed a haphazard collection of memorabilia into an important African American museum and tourist destination. "I think that may be my proudest accomplishment," he said in an interview.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
SILAO, Mexico - Pope Benedict XVI began a pilgrimage to the New World on Friday, calling on Mexicans to conquer an "idolatry of money" that feeds drug violence and urging Cuba to leave behind a Marxism that "no longer responds to reality. " Mexican President Felipe Calderon and first lady Margarita Zavala greeted the pope and escorted him along a red carpet amid a clanging of church bells and cheers from a crowd waving Vatican flags. A swelling throng gathered to cheer him along his path from the airport on his first visit to Spanish-speaking Latin America.
NEWS
March 17, 2012
Belgium mourns crash victims BRUSSELS - Belgium held a national day of mourning Friday for the 28 victims of a school bus crash in Switzerland, ringing church bells and stopping trains and factories to show solidarity with heartbroken parents. Swiss authorities, meanwhile, investigated whether the design of the tunnel the bus crashed in contributed to the disaster. At 11 a.m., the nation held a minute of silence to mark Tuesday's crash, which killed 22 children returning from "snow classes" in the Alps.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Martha Woodall and Shaj Mathew, Inquirer Staff Writers
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput granted at least five of the 21 Catholic elementary schools' appeals to remain open, according to early word leaking out Thursday. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia was not expected to make an official announcement about the appeals until Friday morning. (Inquirer education writer Kristen Graham will live-tweet the announcement .) Archdiocesan spokeswoman Donna Farrell said Chaput had canceled a trip to Rome this weekend because of the appeals process.
NEWS
October 17, 2010
This is not the column I really want to write. The column I want to write will be written with church bells pealing and the lead will be an announcement that cancer is over, the cure has been found and henceforth, no more mothers, brothers, sisters, and sons will be stolen by that killer. That column will be a celebration. This column will be a report to my investors, written not with church bells pealing, but with feet up, callused, blistered, and tender to the touch. As some of you know, I recently walked in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day For The Cure, a 60-mile hike to raise money against breast cancer.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council has spoken: The bell at St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church in Manayunk most likely won't be silenced. "You are preaching to the choir," Majority Leader Marian B. Tasco told a neighboring minister who argued in favor of St. John's bell ringing at a hearing Tuesday by Council's Committee on Public Health and Human Services. On Thursday, the full Council will consider the legislation, which would exempt churches and schools from Philadelphia's noise ordinance. A final vote could occur next Thursday.
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